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Author Topic: Coyote  (Read 1184 times)
BlueBee
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« on: April 11, 2013, 10:07:59 PM »

Wikipedia says Coyotes are omnivores.  Are they attracted to bee hives?  Would they rip them open if hungry?  Anybody know?

I’ve got most of my hives on a farm and something is messing with them.  They’re on stands about 28” tall and the legs of the stands are made from smooth cast iron (plumbing) pipe.  The skinny legs were to help keep the ants out, but they should also make it difficult for things like Skunks and Raccoons’ to get up to the hives.  Yet something is getting up on the stands and knocking a hive (and weight) over on occasion. 

We’ve got lots of Skunks, Coons, Deer, and Coyotes around here, but I haven’t heard of a bear in the immediate area for years. 

Of coarse my hives are made out of polystyrene and they can’t take the abuse the animals are giving them. Sad  This wasn’t a problem in a residential backyard, but on the farm the wild life seems a little more bold; or hungry. huh
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BlueBee
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2013, 10:13:10 PM »

Also got red foxes out there?  Also omnivores.  Do foxes mess with bees?
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2013, 10:21:00 PM »

i have tons of them here and have never had them mess with a hive.
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wouldliketobee
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« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2013, 12:03:26 PM »

I've had racoons climb a single antenna pole, to enter an attic vent, I saw a cat run up a 9 lite utility window, I have Blue Bird houses and they're always being tormented by something.  I'm betting racoons, are your culprit. If you can, set up a trail camera and the mystery will soon be solved. You may want to set up a multi strand electric fence. Raccoons are very smart, strong , and can be very heavy they may be climbing up and just their weight could cause the hives to tip over. Good luck.
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hjon71
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« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2013, 10:00:08 PM »

Are you securing the hive to the stand? Might help, or they might knock the whole thing over.
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RHBee
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2013, 02:05:48 AM »

I would set snares and traps. You know eliminate the problem.

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gov1623
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« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2013, 07:35:43 AM »

do they have cows around? I keep some hives in a cow pasture and they love to rub against the bee hives.
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squidink
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« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2013, 05:39:25 PM »

What about mischievous children?
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capt44
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« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2013, 09:17:20 PM »

If you have a coyote problem the game and fish commission uses ethafoam.
Cut it into 1 inch squares and soak it in chicken or Beef Broth.
Put it out where they are known to be.
They will eat it but can't digest it, thus killing the coyote.
But beware dogs will eat it too.
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
BlueBee
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« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2013, 12:43:52 AM »

It’s probably Coons after the bees, but I was curious about the Coyotes.

I had problems with Skunks until I went to stands (or a top entrance).  I was hoping that would solve all my animal problems.  Looks like there is a little more work to be done. Sad
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Dimmsdale
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2013, 09:15:24 PM »

My Dad, an avid trapper, always used to use the saying, " he's happier than a coyote eating yellow jackets!"  Makes more sense now!  Lol
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dirt road
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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2013, 10:58:38 PM »

I seriously doubt that coyotes are your problem. Folks around here tend to like coyotes, as they usually won't bother much of anything if they can get mice, (voles). They won't pass up an easy meal if they happen upon it, birds, feral house cats, etc. but if they have to hunt they much prefer rodents. I don't think raiding a beehive would be an "easy meal".
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BMAC
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« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2013, 07:24:48 AM »

I have never had a raccoon tip over a beehive.  cows, horses, bears on the other hand.  I have had raccoons open up hives and tear out frames and leave them laying on the ground.

Sure you dont have a young bear problem?  Young bears are notorious for playing with hives and not tearing them up as they are not sure what to do with it yet.
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danno
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« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2013, 07:57:52 AM »

I have been a K9 trapper both as a hobby and as a business since the late 70's.   I have trapped, snared and shot 1000's of animals for fur and as animal damage control.  K9s are not a  problem.   I have a yard of 20 colonies at the top of a southern facing hill.  They have been there for 3 years now.  Half way down the slope is a den that coyotes use every spring.  I have drove into this site and surprised pups playing hide and seek around my pallets
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2013, 03:37:54 PM »

I have had issues with skunks, opossums and racoons, but never had a coyote eating bees.  Chickens, yes, but bees, no.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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BlueBee
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« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2013, 12:04:44 AM »

Thanks everyone for the info about Coyotes. 

It’s good to know I don’t have to worry about the Coyotes.  If the problems continue, I suppose my next step will be adding an electric fence.  The top entrance (or hive stand) has solved my skunk problems in the past (and I still use them) so I suspect the culprit this time is the Raccoons.  The ones that got knocked over were actually 6 frame polystyrene nucs.  They aren’t the heaviest things around to begin with; even with a weight on top.  A raccoon could probably knock them over.
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annette
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« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2013, 12:08:57 AM »

 My husband saw a very large raccoon going down the road where I keep my hives. The raccoon tipped over my hive and ate some honey. Left the brood frames. I believe the bees stung it to death as the body of the raccoon was found not far down the road the next day.
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