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Author Topic: Wind break  (Read 581 times)
Orlando
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« on: April 06, 2013, 05:23:36 PM »

Any creative, inexpensive wind break ideas for apiaries?
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wouldliketobee
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2013, 05:52:05 PM »

I have 3 hives in an old cyclone fence dog kennel with a 20 dollar tarp on west and north sides in winter time, tarps last a couple of years. I don't know about creative , I'd say crude but effective. If you need a more attractive wind break, a couple of wood fence panels would work well.   
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ScottAz
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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2013, 06:01:50 PM »

Builders showed up to survey a nearby lot for tree clearance prior to digging out a new home's would-be basement/foundation. They let me cut and drag away enough small(ish) trees to build a 6-foot tall, 20-foot long windbreak for two hives prior to this last winter. Sorry to see all of those trees have to come down, but they were going to go to waste and the price was right.
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PLAN-B
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2013, 07:06:55 PM »

I am fortunate enough to a four stall barn on the north side of where my bees are located, but i was going to put them in a different location originally and was thinking a few 6' wooden fence panels would work. They sell them at home depot already made if you don't want to build them. Could always plant blackberries or something on them just for an added bonus...
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Marshall
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2013, 08:11:50 PM »

I'm planting a row of shrubs.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 08:31:10 PM by Steel Tiger » Logged
gjd
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« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2013, 11:20:43 AM »

Rebar stakes holding pallets on end, scrap lumber slid inside the pallets for solid wall.  That'll get you 40-48" (in the USA, at least); you could stack two pallets high with some extra work to secure it.
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greenbtree
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« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2013, 11:38:11 AM »

If you have the space available, shrubs or small trees are best.  A wall will end up with turbulence behind the wall, while a shrub allows just enough air flow through to prevent it.  Or use a slatted fence.  Studies have shown that the best wind block is smaller shrubs and trees backed up with larger ones - the majority of the wind will lift up and over, with the remaining preventing turbulence.  This is why you see so much of that pattern planted around houses out in the countryside.  I think the Agriculture Department even has a pamphlet or PDF file that shows the spacing and suggests species.

JC


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AliciaH
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« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2013, 01:19:49 PM »

I like the pallet idea, if you ask local feed stores, they often have a few they are willing to part with that aren't in good enough condition for moving supplies, but would work well for your wind break.

Also, straw bales work well.  Not very expensive and easily movable, but they will rot over time.  Not sure you'd get more than one season out of them. 
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Joe D
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« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2013, 01:31:25 PM »

I also have my bees is an old dog kennel.  There has been remodeling going on at a mall, when the contractor finishes one part they take down the heavy plastic sheeting with cord in it, and gave me some.  I put it up on the north and west sides, my pen also has a roof.  I am in the process of fixing another yard, have been thinking about putting redtop hedge around it.  Good luck Orlando.




Joe
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Steel Tiger
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« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2013, 02:16:45 PM »

I like the pallet idea, if you ask local feed stores, they often have a few they are willing to part with that aren't in good enough condition for moving supplies, but would work well for your wind break.

Also, straw bales work well.  Not very expensive and easily movable, but they will rot over time.  Not sure you'd get more than one season out of them. 
You can get more than one season, but you'll also be making homes for mice and other rodents
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Jasonw5846
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« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2013, 02:48:12 PM »

Home Depot sells cheap 4' x 8' picket fencing for around $22.00 that could be used like this < [] > make sure not to shade the hive with the fence.  This is what I do.
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Orlando
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« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2013, 07:47:57 PM »

Some good ideas...tks
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wouldliketobee
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« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2013, 12:06:36 AM »

I was given 15 bales of straw a few years ago and it made a great wind break but as already mentioned the mice love it and being that close to hives can be a problem . I could see were at times a fence could cause turbulence , but in the winter my hives are under almost constant wind and if I stand next to the hives there is a very noticeable difference behind the fence and tarp ,feels alot warmer, a person may need to do some testing to suit the needs for their area .
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