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Author Topic: first time beekeepers shopping list?  (Read 789 times)
kd8kty
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Location: Ohio


« on: April 01, 2013, 12:44:35 PM »

okay! so in my last post, i was warned against not buying a kit. not EXACTLY sure why, but if its only to save money, then im on board for sure! so then... what do i need??!! haha. Heres what i think i NEED to get started. basically the bare minimum:

4 cinder blocks
for 2, 10 frame hives:
4 deeps
4 shallow supers
2 screened bottom boards
2 telescopic tops
80 frames (40 for deeps, 40 for supers)
2 reducers
sprayer bottle
hood
smoker
BEES!

then down the road we need:
hot knife
a frame spinner
filters
jars
stuffs to winterize the hives

where do you guys recommend we get bees from if we cant find any local (seems most places say online they are sold out for spring)

thanks guys!!!
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Dimmsdale
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Location: Berkeley Springs, West Virginia


« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2013, 01:13:02 PM »

Don't forget your trusty Hive Tool.  Should be first on your list!  Also, fill out your location in your profile.  You will get better, location specific answers if we know where you are from instead of "hopelessly Lost".  Good luck with your new addiction.
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Nyleve
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Location: Ontario, Canada


« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2013, 01:48:44 PM »

I like my bee brush - which I use to move the bees off frames or whatever I want to work on. They seem to not get so angry off with the brush as with my hand. Speaking of which, also some gloves are good to have. I don't have the nerve to do my bee chores barehanded.
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danno
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2013, 02:19:15 PM »

your going to need a feeder of some kind.  I preferr hive top feeders.  You will need to decide on foundation and because you have the knife and extractor as "down the road"  what I would do is crush and strain supers so thin surplus and for your brood I would suggest black plastic.  It makes finding eggs so much easier for beginners.  There is a good chance the first year you wont even need your supers but you never know.  Also after a couple of years of crush and strain and the "down the road" time comes you can clean your frames up and install foundation.  Wedge top frames are easier to clean up.  As someone stated a hive tool. Dont buy just one.  They are small, cheap and I missplace them all the time.  As for the hood. I have one and use it alot for quick checks but I really like my jacket and it doesn't cost much more then a hood and helmet.  You might want a pair of gloves.  Some like them some dont  You will also need inner cover if you use telescopic tops
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buzzbee
Ken
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2013, 06:28:31 PM »

I don't think I saw inner covers for under the telescoping covers.
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Ken
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2013, 06:33:43 PM »

I know you said the classes are full,but does the local club have meetings beside the classes? That would be the place to find out where they are getting packages. Chances are soemone is delivering local and may have extra. That is your best shot I think.
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Vance G
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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2013, 07:24:54 PM »

You don't need

SBB's, get or make solid bottom boards and reduce them down so bees can control climate better.
I would make or buy the much cheaper migratory style covers
If you are getting bees late or insist on the SSB's, you can hold off on the supers, you won't need them this year.
Splurge and get two hive tools!  They get lost easy and are indispensible! 
A frame grip is good property.
On second thought, buy two shallow boxes and you can use them as feeder rims for feeding with baggies.
You won't need the reducers this year. 

Keep looking for bees.  Try Craigslist for local nucs whereever hopelessly lost is. 
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buzzbee
Ken
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« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2013, 07:50:25 PM »

He is in Ohio. I will fix this in his profile.
But entarnce reducers are cheap. And a new colony can benefit by closing off the bottom to make a smaller entrance to defend. And for slowing the draft down until they get better established on bare foundation.
The supers are a good idea to use as a rim around the feeders. You can use them to surround a feeder jar over the hole in the inner cover too.
Personally,I like the little air space you get with a telescopic cover over an inner cover.But you will need to decide which way you want to go on that one.I also like the beemax outer covers better than the standard cover with the metal top.

Another thought on the supers, you can keep them around and use to put bees in if you happen to catch a swarm after your first two colonies are started. They never really go to waste. I was not prepared for my first swarm when starting out.
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Joe D
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« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2013, 08:33:04 PM »

You may want some gloves.  If there is a local bee club, join, a member may take you under their wing and at least give you local advice.  They may have an extractor when you need one to use or rent it to you.  I use a scrapper instead of a hot knife, and I use a soft paint brush as my bee brush.  Good luck to you



Joe
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JackM
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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2013, 08:10:38 AM »

Frankly I would just get an Ultra Breeze JACKET, right up front, save some money.
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“I now have absolute proof that smoking even one marijuana cigarette is equal in brain damage to being on Bikini Island during an H-bomb blast” – Ronald Reagan
Jim 134
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« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2013, 08:33:45 AM »

 th_thumbsupup



             BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
mikecva
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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2013, 11:34:21 AM »

Welcome to beekeeping and the forum.   cheer -Mike
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Listen to others but make your own decisions. That way you own the results.
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123_Bee
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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2013, 06:54:34 PM »

You'll need a hive tool, probably two because you're sure to lose one, and you'll need something to light your smoker and to make smoke with.

Some gloves - latex, washing-up gloves will do because even if you've got calm bees you're still going to get propolis all over your fingers, and your hive tool, and your clothes, the door handle etc..

A tool box would be good, to keep bits and pieces in - maybe a magnifying glass to see the eggs that are so hard to find when you're new. If you're handy you can make a box out of scrap timber.

If it gets cold you might want to get some insulation to fill the gap around the feeder in the super.

Once you've had bees for more than a few months you'll want more equipment, and you'll need a shed to store it in.  Wink
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johng
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« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2013, 02:33:11 PM »

All good advice so far. Good luck with your bees.
You can skip two of the blocks. Get two blocks and two 4x4s this will give you move room to set stuff on and keep it off the ground. It will also give you room for another hive or two. And trust me you always end up with another hive somehow.
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mikecva
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« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2013, 03:20:49 PM »

About hive tools: do not put them in your back pocket for a couple of reasons, one, you will get honey on your cloths and the bees will go after the honey on your back pocket. Also, many a car/truck seats have been slashed by the forgotten hive tool.  -Mike
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Listen to others but make your own decisions. That way you own the results.
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kd8kty
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Location: Ohio


« Reply #15 on: April 06, 2013, 10:54:55 AM »

sorry its taken me so long to respond... i will be starting a new thread shortly!
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