Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 21, 2014, 02:52:51 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: First Time: 100% losses  (Read 1732 times)
BMAC
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 615

Location: Upstate NY Schoharie county


WWW
« Reply #20 on: April 01, 2013, 10:18:26 AM »

Yes, fight the good fight.

Pretty sure it was because the populations in all my hives were not really booming going into winter. I chalk that up to the effect of Varroa on them.  I broke down only 3 of my hives today and I'd estimate I have 120+ pounds of honey - just from these three!. Lots of it is crystallized so I'm going to have to cut it up and sell it as comb honey.  I don't use foundation so it's fairly easy.

Has this comb been used for brood that the honey is stored in now?  If so I dont think you want to sell it.  In fact if the comb doesn't look pristine I personally would not sell it.  You may find you are driving customers away.  Maybe its better to keep that food for your new swarms and cutouts.
Logged

God Bless all the troops
Semper Fi Marines!
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #21 on: April 01, 2013, 10:35:45 AM »

.
I asked from Finland's main beekeeping educator, what he has found about big losses in some areas.

- What you mean?
- When we talked last, you were going to look 150 hives yard where every single hive had died last winter.
- Yes, varroa loads were heavy. They had treated too lightly in August the colonies. Only 5 day treatment and then oxalic trickling too early.

A beekeeper was very experienced but that happened.


4-5 years ago our main educator wrote wrote that he has not nothing to say any more because things go fine with varroa.

But then everything turned around. Hives started to die more and more.

They say that varroa has become more danger because side diseases like viruses are more angry.

It seems too, that even if modern treatments promise 96% reduction in mites, too often reduction is only 70-80%. That leave too much living mites into the hive.

I have found myself, that when I have a feeling that I know this thing, the varroa hits back worse than ever.


Nowadays countries tell about big hives losses purely for varroa.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
2Sox
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 169


Location: Delaware County, New York


« Reply #22 on: April 01, 2013, 02:44:35 PM »


I'm the only one within a hundred mile radius who does them plus I have ads running in the local papers and online. 


Don't count on that.  Im just on the north side of you and I collect swarms, and cut out colonies for people. 

You would be better off treating for mites after pulling the last of the honey off.

Thanks for the advice and I am considering treatment - about 0.001 percent there already.  Wink And I certainly do "count on that".  I did twelve cut outs last season and got called for that many swarms.  I have no doubt at all that I'll be able to build up again. And I don't have any plans for buying bees - especially from the south. 
Logged

"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
2Sox
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 169


Location: Delaware County, New York


« Reply #23 on: April 01, 2013, 02:46:49 PM »

Duplicate post deleted.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2013, 03:16:37 PM by 2Sox » Logged

"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
sterling
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 963

Location: mt juliet tn


« Reply #24 on: April 01, 2013, 07:15:56 PM »


I'm the only one within a hundred mile radius who does them plus I have ads running in the local papers and online. 


Don't count on that.  Im just on the north side of you and I collect swarms, and cut out colonies for people. 

You would be better off treating for mites after pulling the last of the honey off.

Thanks for the advice and I am considering treatment - about 0.001 percent there already.  Wink And I certainly do "count on that".  I did twelve cut outs last season and got called for that many swarms.  I have no doubt at all that I'll be able to build up again. And I don't have any plans for buying bees - especially from the south. 

Were the bees you had from the South?
Logged
2Sox
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 169


Location: Delaware County, New York


« Reply #25 on: April 01, 2013, 08:23:32 PM »

The bees weren't from the south, although during the season I had actually gotten several queens from the south to get a few colonies out of trouble.  When I started, I had Russian hybrids. But by this time, I don't know what I've ended up with because so many are from swarms and cut outs and they've requeened themselves several times. 

I like Olivarez' queens out of California, if I have to order any.



Logged

"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
BMAC
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 615

Location: Upstate NY Schoharie county


WWW
« Reply #26 on: April 02, 2013, 08:10:50 AM »

Im not doubting you making up your colonies with cutouts and capturing swarms.  I don't do many cutouts here in this area.  People here expect it done for free.  I did many more cutouts in KC when I lived there.

Im just doubting you are 100 miles from me.  I suppose its possible. 

Though they may seem like native bees (is there such a thing in north america?)  I would bet these swarms, cutouts come from large commercial guys in your close vicinity who run south in the winter.  Maybe not, but you maybe surprised.

If you were to buy queens why wouldn't you buy them from Lynn Barton?  He is practically your neighbor and raises queens here in NY.
Logged

God Bless all the troops
Semper Fi Marines!
2Sox
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 169


Location: Delaware County, New York


« Reply #27 on: April 02, 2013, 09:47:59 AM »

I'm glad you're not doubting me - otherwise I'd have to show you my Schedule C for my LLC. Smiley  If you'd like, I can PM you my contract with my rates for my cut outs and my listing on the Internet.

Perhaps, I was exagerating the mileage.  I've done cutouts as far away as Cooperstown and that's around 52 miles away and Budd Lake, NJ about 150 miles away - but that was a day when I was coming from NYC, so that doesn't count. I'm affiliated with two other beekeepers so we cover a very wide area.

Thanks for the lead on Lyn Barton.  Please send me his contact info. Thanks.
Logged

"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.229 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 23, 2014, 06:33:28 AM
anything