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Author Topic: anyone build their own frames?  (Read 3743 times)
greg755
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« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2013, 09:32:43 AM »

I very rarely make frames anymore because of time, but when I do I just buy the parts (cheap) and use a frame  jig box which saves a lot of time...
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TemeculaBeek
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« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2013, 10:31:39 PM »

This guy does really good with explaining the process he uses making frames.


I was going to post these same links. I like the way he uses stop blocks on his radial arm saw for many of his cuts. His jigs are something I would like to use also. He has a pdf you can buy on amazon that shows how he makes all his stuff I think its like $4 (us)

I have to agree with others who have responded. I was amazed he has all 10 fingers and didn't get kicked out wood. He's too careless. but the jigs are nice.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2013, 10:35:23 PM »

I'm waiting for somebody to build plastic foundation from a 3D printer.  Or better yet, fulled combed frames out of wax.  If you can squirt ink, can't you squirt wax?   
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TemeculaBeek
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« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2013, 10:39:55 PM »

I'm waiting for somebody to build plastic foundation from a 3D printer.  Or better yet, fulled combed frames out of wax.  If you can squirt ink, can't you squirt wax?   

Some of the 3d printers use wax... others use a type of plastic.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2013, 10:51:58 PM »

Can they use bees wax though? 

How long would it take to print out a deep frame on a 3D printer?
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nietssemaj
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« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2013, 10:03:52 AM »

I'm waiting for somebody to build plastic foundation from a 3D printer.  Or better yet, fulled combed frames out of wax.  If you can squirt ink, can't you squirt wax?  

Cool idea. Wish I could afford a 3d printer..
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 10:18:11 AM by nietssemaj » Logged
fshrgy99
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« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2013, 02:07:44 PM »

In the same vein I am waiting for someone to fax me a drawn wax frame..... and a cup of earl grey tea  ..hot Smiley
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LizardKing
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« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2014, 11:08:20 AM »

I'm waiting for somebody to build plastic foundation from a 3D printer.  Or better yet, fulled combed frames out of wax.  If you can squirt ink, can't you squirt wax?   

It will take some experimentation but I am sure it is possible without too much trouble.
One would certainly do best to make the foundation out of your own clean wax.
I have also thought a 3d printer would be useful for making bee escapes, feeders, queen cages,
and beetle traps.
Be nice to test your own trap ideas and make useful beek stuff.
How come I have never seen anyone use 1/2" x 1/8" aluminum angle in the box dadoes to hold the frames up?
I am certainly eager to hear what experienced beeks think of this idea to save box and frame wear and tear.
I have seen the cheap steel pieces for sale for this, but aluminum angles are cheap and easily found.
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jredburn
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« Reply #28 on: March 04, 2014, 08:23:07 PM »

I build my own boxes and frames.  I have come to the conclusion that the standard frames are over designed and complicated beyond necessity.  I was a structural engineer before retiring.
I do things differently and the frames are no exception.  The top bar is 3/4" wide x 3/8" thick x 19" long.  No dado cuts, just a rectangular piece of wood.  The side bars are 1/4" x 1/4" x 9 -1/8" for deeps.   Again just a rectangular piece of wood.  The bottom bar is 3/4" wide x 3/8" thick x 18" long. Again just  a rectangular piece of wood.  I then take a 5/16" dia. drill bit and drill a hole in the top and bottom boards where the standard Lang side bar would be.  This give me bee space on the sides.  I put a drop of Titebond glue on the end of the 1/4" sticks and drive them into the holes with a rubber mallet.  Make sure they are square and flat and let the glue dry.  Take a push pin and put it into the side of the top bar, one in the end of alternating sides for spacers.
If you use foundation ( I don't) set it in place and attach it with a hot glue gun.
They work.  Their cheap and quick to make.  I use a 14" band saw with a 3/4" blade.
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