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Author Topic: Apiary stand / structure  (Read 540 times)
dfizer
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« on: April 02, 2013, 07:15:33 PM »

Ok - after garnering inspiration from some previous posts here a few months ago I decided to embark on a project of my own.  First, I cut some locust posts and dug 3 foot holes with my manually powered post hole digger.  Then set the posts and that's as far as i've gotten (see pics).  My plan is the put a frame of pressure treated 2x6's around and attached to the locust posts.  Then I'll put another 2x6 about 18 inches from the outside on each side.  This is what will support the hives.  I plan to set these joists apart the same distance as a frame is so that I can use it as a frame rest when performing hive inspections. 







Is there anything else you would recommend, or possibly that I have not considered?  I want to make any last minute adjustments before the 2x6's go on!  The reason I cut my posts the length they are is that I want to be able to attach something to it to provide a wind break during the winters.  Also I have considered cutting a small opening in the 2x6's where the hives are going to rest so that I can slip a white mite board in easily. 

Thoughts? 

David
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2013, 10:30:43 PM »

I recommend you place the posts so that the outer edges are about 19" apart from front to back. That way you have maximum protection from tipping over and you can get your fingers under the back edge and lift the hive a few inches to feel how heavy they are. How long are your  2 x 6 going to be?
Jim
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dfizer
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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2013, 09:29:52 AM »

The 2 x 6's are just going to be 8 footers.  It's going to be an 8 foot square.  The inside 2x6 is going tobe slightly higher than the front one so that water will run off properly. 

One question, does it matter to the bees how close the hives are to each other? 

David
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Moots
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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2013, 09:41:47 AM »


One question, does it matter to the bees how close the hives are to each other? 

David

David,
Not really...I think most people like to leave a foot or so.  I've heard others recommending just enough space to fit your hive tool so that you can still work them easily when your hives are at different heights.  I've also seen videos of big operations with 40 or more hives butting up against one another with no space at all.  If they are too close you may end up with some bees drifting from one hive to the other, which really isn't a problem to the best of my knowledge. 
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dfizer
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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2013, 09:48:48 AM »

That's kind of what I thought.  I'll post more pics as the project progresses.  One minor setback - more snow today so the project waits....

I SO done with winter.  It's APRIL for crying out loud!

David
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2013, 11:42:31 AM »

David,
You are in NY. What do you expect? Did you think you are in FL?  grin
Jim
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BMAC
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2013, 12:06:22 PM »

That's kind of what I thought.  I'll post more pics as the project progresses.  One minor setback - more snow today so the project waits....

I SO done with winter.  It's APRIL for crying out loud!

David

Tamarack will last much longer than pressure treated wood and its cheaper than pressure treated wood.  Let me know and I can turn you towards a mill in the area that cuts Tamarack.
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dfizer
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2013, 01:06:57 PM »

I wish I had known that before I purchased the 2x6's.  Is there a place near me that supplies the tamarack?  I'm in Ballston Spa / Saratoga County.

@Jim - Unfortunately I'm fully aware of where I am...  But snow now, although not unheard of, is still a little out of the norm even for upstate ny in April. 

David
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BMAC
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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2013, 03:00:36 PM »

Yeah.  Its an amish sawmill Just south west of Amsterdam NY.  Probably 40 minutes from Ballston Spa.  Let me know and I will get you their address.  I will be buying Tamarac for making my beeboxes this summer.
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