Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 25, 2014, 05:10:26 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wild Tree Hive  (Read 700 times)
fishman
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 21

Location: Central Indiana


« on: March 25, 2013, 03:36:56 AM »

I have never dealt with this issue. The swarms and cutouts I have done were pretty straight forward.

 I have a friend who in his woods has a tree with an apparent hollow area in it.(close to house) It has held Honey Bees for approx 3 years. It seems it is getting bigger, and now his Wife wants them removed, and not hurt the tree either. The entrance is approx 30 feet from the ground. I have no way to get up there, with anything. 

  The question is, has anyone had any luck placing a super on a stepladder or something on the ground, and somehow luring them in with maybe lemon grass? I am looking for ideas so that this may become a win win situation. I would think it is hard to get them all coaxed out?Huh
Logged
bud1
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 747


Location: macon, Ms.


« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2013, 06:32:54 AM »

you are rite; impossible; catch you a swarm wid a bait hive . and with a tree cut out you rarely find the queen. too many places to hide  but a swarm a yr. i love my bee trees.  that high up they never gona have a problem with it  good thing to have around to show other people
Logged

to bee or not to bee
D Semple
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 504

Location: Overland Park, Kansas


« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2013, 09:15:52 AM »

I agree with Bud. I always try to talk people into keeping their bee trees, by teaching them about how great they are to have in the neighborhood. And, then I teach them when and how to watch for swarms, and to call me when they see one. A big jar of honey goes along ways.  grin

I caught about 30 swarms last year and most came from known bee trees. Better than money in the bank.


Don
« Last Edit: March 25, 2013, 09:27:03 AM by D Semple » Logged
D Coates
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1074


Location: Lee's Summit, MO


« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2013, 09:23:13 AM »

I'd say do a trap out.  At 30ft high though and they don't want to hurt the tree the best you're going to do is capture swarms off of that hive.  You'll never lure the actual hive down.  You can however,make it a decent win win by removing the resulting cast swarms if the hive is getting bigger as described.  As usual Don and bud1 are dead on.
Logged

Ninja, is not in the dictionary.  Well played Ninja's, well played...
D Semple
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 504

Location: Overland Park, Kansas


« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2013, 09:30:29 AM »

High tree trap outs can be done, but they are hard and DANGEROUS:



Carrying a 80 lbs. hive, chalk full of bees down a ladder isn't smart.


Don
Logged
fishman
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 21

Location: Central Indiana


« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2013, 06:20:14 PM »

Thanks for all the input. Hope to talk to his Wife soon. 
Logged
bailey
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 874


Location: RACELAND LA


« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2013, 09:32:53 PM »

It's not worth your neck!!
Just place swarm traps in the area and catch them that way.  I would just decline to try to get that hive.
She will leave the tree and you catch the swarms by default
Bailey
Logged

most often i find my greatest source of stress to be OPS  ( other peoples stupidity )

It is better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought of as a fool than to open ones mouth and in so doing remove all doubt.
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13978


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2013, 09:48:11 AM »

I always try to figure out what a package is worth (right now about $100 I think) and then weigh that against the risk and time.  If you fall off the ladder (and it's hard not to sometimes with bees stinging you badly) your hospital bill will be significantly more than $100... so keep that in mind.  Last time I climbed a 20 foot ladder to get a swarm it fell down the back of my neck instead of in the box... it's very difficult to calmly climb down a ladder when you are getting badly stung... but that is exactly what you have to do if you don't want to end up in the hospital...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
oliver
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 147


Location: cent ill


« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2013, 04:46:01 PM »

Passed on several of these, just not worth the risk
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.094 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page November 13, 2014, 12:09:35 AM
anything