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Author Topic: extracting + other ?"s  (Read 1048 times)

Offline bill

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extracting + other ?"s
« on: November 26, 2005, 06:24:16 AM »
I have been using for the second time my large extractor. and I need a little input. what is a good temperature to  extract?

should you go as fast as possible or use a slower speed to run at maximum stability? Maybe the fastest smooth speed I am thinking.

I am using my weakl hives to clean the frames that survived the extracting. after they are clean, i would think that an empty hive body would be the best storage for the drawn comb, I am short of shed space. that would be best with a lid on bottom and top, or not?

I tried heating up a knife, not owning hot knife, is there a better way? some of the cells didn't get emptied and a few of them tore up.
I will appreciate you comments and answere

If some of them are a bit mashed will the bees repair them next spring  or should I scrap them and use foundation?
billiet

Offline amymcg

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extracting + other ?"s
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2005, 09:43:58 AM »
Good extracting temperature - The warmer the better, 80-90 is good. It flows faster. Faster flow leads to your next question.

As far as speed, you don't want to go too fast, you could blow out the foundation.   Just go for a comfortable speed, heat is your friend, if it's warm, the honey comes out faster and less damage to the combs.

Empty hive body is great, I'm not sure I understand what shed space has to do with lids.  Put them on top of newspaper and put a lid on the top.  

I don't have a hot knife either, you can use a bread knife something serrated is best.  Just keep a pan of hot water, Put the knife in it between uncapping.

When you say some of the cells didn't get emptied, do you  mean they didn't get uncapped?  Use an uncapping fork to scrape open the capped cells.

the bees will fix it all in the spring.

Offline stilllearning

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Re: extracting + other ?"s
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2005, 09:45:36 AM »
Quote from: bill
I have been using for the second time my large extractor. and I need a little input. what is a good temperature to  extract?

THE WARMER IT IS, THE EASIER IT IS TO DO A GOOD JOB.  IMO NEVER
LESS THAN 90 DEGREES

should you go as fast as possible or use a slower speed to run at maximum stability? Maybe the fastest smooth speed I am thinking.

EXTRACTING AT A HIGHER SPEED REMOVES MORE HONEY,
I START OUT SLOW AND GRADUALLY BUILD UP SOMETIMES, I
REARRANGE THE FRAMES FOR A SMOTHER SPIN IN MY 9/18 EXTRACTOR

I am using my weakl hives to clean the frames that survived the extracting. after they are clean, i would think that an empty hive body would be the best storage for the drawn comb, I am short of shed space. that would be best with a lid on bottom and top, or not?

THAT WILL WORK OK, BUT YOU HAVE TO PUT MOTH PROTECTION
IN EACH SUPER BOX, OR IN THE SPRING YOU WILL HAVE NOTHING LEFT.

I tried heating up a knife, not owning hot knife, is there a better way? some of the cells didn't get emptied and a few of them tore up.
I will appreciate you comments and answere

A SERRATED KNIFE WILL WORK, OFTEN USED TO CUT FROZEN FOOD,
THE HEATED KNIFE YOU ARE USEING HAS BEEN USED FOR YEARS,
BY MANY KEEPERS, YOU MIGHT TRY USEING TWO, SO ONE STAYS HOT
ALL THE TIME, USE A FORK TO SCRATCH THE TOPS OFF ANY LOW CELLS
UNOPENED CELLS OFTEN ARE NOT EXTRACTED ACT LIKE A LEAD WEIGHT
AND TEAR UP THE COMB.

If some of them are a bit mashed will the bees repair them next spring  or should I scrap them and use foundation?


THE BEES WILL REPAIR THEM, YOU JUST NEED TO MAKE A JUDGEMENT
CALL AS TO THEIR VALUE.  COMBS WILL GIVE YOU A HEAD START NEXT
YEAR, YEILDING A BETTER CROP.
Wayne Cole

Offline Michael Bush

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extracting + other ?"s
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2005, 12:10:38 PM »
The first trick is balancing the extractor.  When you hit some light ones always put the next light one opposite the one you just put in even if you have to move one that's already in the extractor.  Also, if you hit a patch of pollen put them opposite.  Usually light ones and pollen filled ones come in bunches and, if you don't pay attention, all end up on the same side.  The pollen ones STAY heavy so they should be blanaced with another pollen one.  The light ones start light and stay light and need to be blanaced with another light.

I try to get it about 80.  90 would flow better but the one time I did that it got a little over that and the candles in the kitchen started to sag.  :)  Not to mention I sweat a lot more at 90 and it's difficult to get the sweat out of your eyes when your hands are sticky.  :)

I tend to start slow regardless.  But then I have had some blowouts and I have a lot of foundationless comb with no wires and I used to use wax foundation with no wires.  Then I work up to whatever the fastest stable spped is.  If that isn't fast enough, I try to rearrange the extractor.  Look for pollen or heavy frames.  When you find a heavy one toward the end of extracting, it's either pollen or you missed a low spot.  Uncap the low spots, swap for the opposite side and try it again.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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