Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 01, 2014, 11:04:03 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Heat for packages  (Read 1170 times)
Bush_84
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 342

Location: Brainerd, MN


« on: March 19, 2013, 11:27:27 AM »

So I have been doing reading about heating hives.  I know several here have at least tinkered with using heat in winter or spring.  So my question is could I use heat for newly installed packages?  I figure maybe it's something to consider until the first batch of brood emerges.  I will feed syrup and protein patties, but maybe the package would be able to tend to a larger swath pf brood with a little help.  Thoughts?  Stupid idea?
Logged

Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13626


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2013, 11:34:24 AM »

I think giving them limited space so they can heat it is better.  Warm syrup helps, more than a warm hive.  They can't take cold syrup.  I often have to warm the syrup up once a day to insure they can take it if the weather turns too cold or nothing is blooming.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Bush_84
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 342

Location: Brainerd, MN


« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2013, 01:38:36 PM »

I think giving them limited space so they can heat it is better.  Warm syrup helps, more than a warm hive.  They can't take cold syrup.  I often have to warm the syrup up once a day to insure they can take it if the weather turns too cold or nothing is blooming.


What's the best way of doing that?  Adding hot syrup? 
Logged

Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13626


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2013, 03:00:42 PM »

It's time consuming, but with a package it's pretty much essential until there is something blooming for them to bring in.  If you take the cold syrup, and pour it back into a pan (from whatever feeder it is in) and heat it on the stove until you can just keep your finger in it without getting burned (if you get too hot, let it cool a few minutes) and then put it back in the feeder.  Once a day is sufficient to keep them full of food.

Dry sugar is less work, but not as effective.  But at least they can eat it when it's cold.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2013, 06:47:49 PM »

.
I have heated hives 10 springs. With pollen patty it gives splended results. in big hives build up is 3-fold.

What Michael says, it does not help. Warm syrup, - no help.


I heat hives 2 months. I use terrarium heaters which are 7-15W.


What you need first:
- insulated box
- space reduced to the size of cluster
- a proper ventilation. To 5 frame  1 cm x 3 cm


The best build up you get if you join 2 packages. Nothing wins that system.

BUT!!! I have noticed that small colonies become often sick with accelerated build up.
Chalk brood hits easily and brood must be destroyed.



.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4194

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2013, 03:31:53 PM »

Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2013, 05:21:47 PM »




Cola breaks your teeth, baby
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4194

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2013, 05:55:09 PM »

My bees don’t have teeth. grin

Finski, when are you going to start warming up your bees?

I've had electric heat on a couple of hives since Feb 15th.  As Finski says, no need to heat syrup if you're using electric.  I can't imagine spending the time to reheat syrup for the bees every morning.  Electric keeps the bees out of cluster and able to get to warm syrup even on nights down in the teens (or negative Cs).
Logged
Vance G
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1100

Location: Great Falls,Montana


« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2013, 06:21:22 PM »

Consider a zip loc bag on top bars above the cluster and a well wrapped box to keep in heat and a small two bee entrance at bottom.  Start out with syrup warm and it will stay that way.  Or warm enough.  Good grief~!  You must still be butt deep on a tall swede in snow~!  After you feed them cover them with snow, wonderful insulation. 
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2013, 12:38:52 AM »

My bees don’t have teeth. grin

Finski, when are you going to start warming up your bees?

I installed them a week ago. Our nights are -15 C and days -5C. Snow has not methet not a bit


Quote
 As Finski says, no need to heat syrup if you're using electric.
4

I have never said that. Bees keep the food warm

Quote

 I can't imagine spending the time to reheat syrup for the bees every morning.  

Me either. I have been in capital city now 4 months and bees are 150 km far away inside snow.





Quote
Electric keeps the bees out of cluster and able to get to warm syrup even on nights down in the teens (or negative Cs).


My winter food is in frames. I added to 3 hives a box of capped honey a week ago. They were near to starve out.
.

Bluubee, you winter feeding system is out everything. No one keeps hives like you.
We have only one life. Why to spend it with you discussing with honey balls?

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4194

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2013, 12:56:46 AM »

I thought variety was the spice of life?

Who’s talking about honeyballs in this thread?  Not me.  Are you talking to yourself again?

OK, I do things a little differently than the average bear.  Is that a crime?  I’m just trying to make my life a little easier by doing things like over wintering the mating nucs and adding a little electric heat to keep a weak hive or two from croaking.  What is so horrible about that? 

LOL, I do have to admit I probably have too many watts in one of my hives. laugh  The darn bees are SUPER active in there!  I may reduce the wattage down to 24 watts in a couple of days.  Right now we’re under another blast of cold from Canada. 
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2013, 01:42:52 AM »


OK, I do things a little differently than the average bear.  Is that a crime? 


Of course not!

Constitution says that we cannot punish twice for same crime.

Why we cannot  punish for stupidity ?  - Because he had allready got one punishment.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Jim 134
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2231


Location: Hinsdale, New Hampshire 03451 USA


WWW
« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2013, 08:32:37 AM »

It's time consuming, but with a package it's pretty much essential until there is something blooming for them to bring in.  If you take the cold syrup, and pour it back into a pan (from whatever feeder it is in) and heat it on the stove until you can just keep your finger in it without getting burned (if you get too hot, let it cool a few minutes) and then put it back in the feeder.  Once a day is sufficient to keep them full of food.

Dry sugar is less work, but not as effective.  But at least they can eat it when it's cold.


   goodpost th_thumbsupup

 

              BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
Logged

"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
dfizer
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 288

Location: Ballston Spa, New York


« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2013, 11:11:36 AM »

Quote
Bluubee, you winter feeding system is out everything. No one keeps hives like you.
We have only one life. Why to spend it with you discussing with honey balls?

Please help me understand as I am confused.... What's wrong with feeding honeyballs?  My bees seem to love them and it was 10F / -12C this morning when I first went out.  Personally, I think heating a hive is insane.  Bees have no heaters in the wild and have done just fine for centuries.  I would surmise that the warmer the hives is more active the bees are and the the more food they would consume, increasing the chance that they could run out and starve therefore to allow them to stay in the cluster may be the best practice for some.

David
Logged
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4194

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2013, 12:06:36 PM »

FYI…here’s what happens to a bowl of hot water left overnight in an insulated nuc in Michigan. 







“The distance between insanity and genius is measured only by success.” Feirstein.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2013, 01:42:43 PM »

Quote
Bluubee, you winter feeding system is out everything. No one keeps hives like you.
We have only one life. Why to spend it with you discussing with honey balls?

Please help me understand as I am confused.... What's wrong with feeding honeyballs?

My bees seem to love them and it was 10F / -12C this morning when I first went out.  

Personally, I think heating a hive is insane.  Bees have no heaters in the wild and have done just fine for centuries.  I would surmise that the warmer the hives is more active the bees are and the the more food they would consume, increasing the chance that they could run out and starve therefore to allow them to stay in the cluster may be the best practice for some.

David

You cannot be serious.  

I cannot explain because I start to cry.

Do you understand what means winter rest in bee cluster and what means energy saving in the bee cluster?

.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Bush_84
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 342

Location: Brainerd, MN


« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2013, 02:42:53 PM »

Quote
Bluubee, you winter feeding system is out everything. No one keeps hives like you.
We have only one life. Why to spend it with you discussing with honey balls?

Please help me understand as I am confused.... What's wrong with feeding honeyballs?  My bees seem to love them and it was 10F / -12C this morning when I first went out.  Personally, I think heating a hive is insane.  Bees have no heaters in the wild and have done just fine for centuries.  I would surmise that the warmer the hives is more active the bees are and the the more food they would consume, increasing the chance that they could run out and starve therefore to allow them to stay in the cluster may be the best practice for some.

David

Keep in mind I am talking about heating newly hived packages in spring.  I am not talking about heating hives in the winter.
Logged

Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2013, 02:56:28 PM »

.
I have 10 years experience about spring heating + patty feeding.
It is very good and that is why I continue it.

Heating helps hives during cold nights. Cluster is able to make wider brood ball.

The secret is in the mathematics of ball volume compared to radius.
The build up may be douple with heating. In big hives 3 fold is possible.


Even human homes did not have here electrict 100 years ago. It does not mean that I could not heat hives, uncap honey with electrict knife or use electrict extracting.  If someone  live like  cave man, he may do it.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
ScituateMA
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 46

Location: MA


« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2014, 06:32:41 PM »

bluebee: I've had electric heat on a couple of hives since Feb 15th (2013)

did you start heating the bees for this year? If so, did you feed them? even if outside is still colder, do you give sugar water and pollen patties since internal temperature of the hive is warm that they can take sugar water?
what do you think if protein patty+ sugar water and heater  is better than protein patty + fondant and heater? my zone is 6a,massachussetts
what kind of product do you use to glue Styrofoam to each other?
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.549 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page August 18, 2014, 02:40:31 AM