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Author Topic: Economical re-queen 5hives  (Read 6793 times)
Orlando
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« on: March 16, 2013, 08:13:24 AM »

Hello. I keep around 5 hives. What is the most economical program/method for re-queening these hives on a yearly to bi-yearly basis? Should I even be concerned with regular requeening?

2nd yr beekeeper.

Thanks
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bailey
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2013, 06:47:52 PM »

There will be many different answers to this one. 
If you want the cheapest way to re queen it's make your own. 

The bees will do it for you in the forms of swarms or supercedure if you do nothing.

If your intent is to re queen yearly or so just make nucs in the spring.   
Then after they make a queen for you
It's an easy thing to then pinch the old queen and introduce the new queens.

Quick and easy.
Bailey.

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most often i find my greatest source of stress to be OPS  ( other peoples stupidity )

It is better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought of as a fool than to open ones mouth and in so doing remove all doubt.
Orlando
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2013, 10:52:42 PM »

Would you then put the nuc frames back in original hive with the new queen if you did not want to make a split?

Any drawback to just allowing a superceder?

thanks

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Jim 134
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2013, 07:05:09 AM »

Hello. I keep around 5 hives. What is the most economical program/method for re-queening these hives on a yearly to bi-yearly basis? Should I even be concerned with regular requeening?

2nd yr beekeeper.

Thanks


Why are you going too re-queening so often IMHO a second year queen are the bests.

http://youtu.be/qIYz65Vquxg

Look at Reply#31

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,40378.msg343942.html#msg343942

      

           BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
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"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
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Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
Orlando
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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2013, 02:55:19 PM »

Jim, for some reason I was under the impression you should requeen regularly. It seemed expensive to buy queens that often...I am figuring there has to be a better way, especially if its for your own apiary and not to sell queens.

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Moots
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2013, 02:56:58 PM »

Jim, for some reason I was under the impression you should requeen regularly. It seemed expensive to buy queens that often...I am figuring there has to be a better way, especially if its for your own apiary and not to sell queens.

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Yeah, I think people who sell queens often promote that impression.... Smiley
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hardwood
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« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2013, 07:34:00 PM »

You don't ever need to requeen if you don't want...just let the bees take care of things. They usually get it right. I sell queens and only recommend requeening if there is a problem. You may wish to change the genetics of the hive or you may have a queen fail for various reasons or maybe she just slows down too much for your liking and the bees haven't decided to supercede yet. Swarm situations can leave you queenless or you might not want to wait on a brood break just before a strong flow. There can be many reasons to requeen but, in my opinion, not just because a certain time has passed.

Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

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bailey
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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2013, 11:30:29 PM »

Scott has it right!!
Bailey
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most often i find my greatest source of stress to be OPS  ( other peoples stupidity )

It is better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought of as a fool than to open ones mouth and in so doing remove all doubt.
Orlando
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2013, 01:54:59 AM »

@Jim....great links for the vids...tks
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Jim 134
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« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2013, 01:06:55 AM »

@Jim....great links for the vids...tks

I am happy to have help you



           BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
don2
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« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2013, 10:28:45 PM »

Question for hard wood. How long does it take for an aging Queen to start rearing aggressive bees? I have always heard as the queen ages the bees become more aggressive, progressively. How true is this? :)d2
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hardwood
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« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2013, 10:51:04 PM »

I haven't experienced that doak although I also haven't ever kept records in that regard. The colony might change attitude when the queen is weak or just not performing but I haven't seen any correlation with age. Not that it doesn't happen, I just haven't taken note of it.

Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
sawdstmakr
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« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2013, 11:06:56 PM »

Orlando,
I think what you are hearing is the best methods and practices for keeping bees in African Bee territory. That's because African bees will take over the hives.
You are way to far north to worry about them.
Jim
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don2
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« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2013, 11:11:20 PM »

Thanks hardwood, I have only one colony. They came in from the wild spring before last. As having to put my bee keeping on the back burner for a year went into them last week and they are very aggressive. Was a cool cloudy day when it was just stopping a few days rain. I closed them up and am waiting for a nice day. Here is my plan. They are 2 deep and boiling over. I added a medium super. I am going to move one of the deeps about 10 ft. and leave the bottom where it is. then in another 5 to 7 days go back and see if I can find the  Queen or at least try to figure out which box she winds up in. In the mean time I am going to buy a new colony next week and try my luck at rearing a few queens. The word is going around that Queens need to be reared as locally as possible. How does my story sound to you?

The reason I don't know all the answers yet is, I was looking in my old bee logs and I have been keeping bees from year 2000. that is only 13 years and that isn't long enough. :)d2
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Steel Tiger
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« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2013, 01:17:54 AM »

They came in from the wild spring before last.

The word is going around that Queens need to be reared as locally as possible. How does my story sound to you?
If you caught them from the wild and they're still going strong 2 years later, chances are they are local.
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hardwood
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« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2013, 09:58:57 AM »

Sounds good to me...I think everyone should learn to raise their own queens. Folks have different definitions of what is "local". Is a queen from 3 states over considered local if the weather patterns are the same? It's good to bring in queens from different breeders from time to time trying to maintain genetic diversity.

Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
Michael Bush
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« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2013, 07:58:10 AM »

>Question for hard wood. How long does it take for an aging Queen to start rearing aggressive bees?

Usually never.

> I have always heard as the queen ages the bees become more aggressive, progressively. How true is this?

I think it is a combination of genetics and an aging queen, perhaps, but I have a lot of four year old queens and no aggressive bees.

>Is a queen from 3 states over considered local if the weather patterns are the same?

I think you view it as two levels of "local".  One is that they have as hard of winters as you, this helps winter survival.  The other is that they actually have the same flows as you, and this can vary in a few miles...

> It's good to bring in queens from different breeders from time to time trying to maintain genetic diversity.

I disagree.  Unless you are insistent on buying all your queens, I would try to maintain local stock and not bring in outside stock.
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Michael Bush
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beek1951
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« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2013, 11:35:56 PM »

I only requeen for genetic diversity or to make strong splits
that must get laying immediately. My production hives usually requeen
themselves and are going strong. I have some mating yards that I
keep high-bred queens on, but haven't been able to beat nature.
IMHO; there is altogether too much requeening going on today!
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Nature Coast Beek
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« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2013, 06:44:26 AM »

Interesting how those in the Southern parts of the US state that re-queening is done too often and an "industry promoted idea". Of course, they are also in areas where brood production shut-down is non-existent and new queens can be had almost entirely without fear of laying worker hive or extreme cold conditions. Sure, a queen that doesn't shut down (South) is going to lay out quicker, but the queen rearing season is also much earlier for the LOCAL stock. Beekeeping is local. I can't say that if I was in an area that had harder, longer winters that I wouldn't be looking to replace a two or three year old queen going into the Fall with my locally available stock. In my opinion, this is where Michael Palmer's ideas of keeping extra nucs around makes a lot of sense. The ability to swap queens back and forth is a nice luxury to have at one's disposal when Spring finally rolls around.

Just my .02
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njfl
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« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2013, 12:53:05 PM »

I agree with beek.  There is an awful lot of requeening going on.  Being in the northeast, I like to do splits with my strong hives in the spring, and allow the bees to make their own queens.  Then I requeen only when I see the need by observing the laying pattern.

Like hardwood says, they usually get it right.
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