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Author Topic: Mite drop results  (Read 954 times)
brushwoodnursery
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« on: March 15, 2013, 04:21:22 PM »

I'm doing a 24 hour mite drop test on my hives with vaseline to catch the crawlers. First result is 9. The colony is small but active. Testing the other 2 today and tomorrow. They are much larger. Can anyone suggest threshold levels for MAQS treatment on these? 9 sounds really high based on what I remember reading somewhere. Maybe that's why it's a small colony.
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brushwoodnursery
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« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2013, 05:08:35 PM »

And while I'm asking, i have MAQS here but it is recommending 85f for the initial daytime high. We have nice warm weather ahead but not that high. Looks like mid 70s for the weekend then mid 60s next week. Do I need to wait? Any thoughts?
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brushwoodnursery
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2013, 05:05:27 PM »

Surprises me that no one wants to give their opinion. Is it something I said?
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ziffabeek
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2013, 05:59:19 PM »

I am not an expert, but I think 9 is not too bad.  Maybe wait a week and do it again, or, if you have a lot of done brood, cut them open and see if you have a lot inside.  Could be they're incubating and haven't begun poppng out of the brood yet.  It probably isn't warm enough to treat, if that is what you choose to do, anyway.

Hopefully someone with more experience will give a better answer.

I'm not sure what maqs are so can't tell you about that. smiley

Love,
ziffa
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RHBee
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2013, 06:25:49 PM »

And while I'm asking, i have MAQS here but it is recommending 85f for the initial daytime high. We have nice warm weather ahead but not that high. Looks like mid 70s for the weekend then mid 60s next week. Do I need to wait? Any thoughts?

If I remember correctly the Mite Away Quick Strips, MAQS, called for a temperature range of daytime highs of 75F to a max of 85F. I used them last year, formic acid, they killed a lot of mites but a lot of bees too. This year I'm going to give Oxalic A id a try. It's softer on the bees and effective, on mites that aren't on capped brood. Two methods of deliver trickling and vaporizing. Both are best done when broodless. Trickling can be done twice spring and fall, vaporizing can be done any time. There is lots of information on this site about both.
As far as threshold of treatment there are two camps. Never treat and treat on a regular basis. Smiley
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Ray
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2013, 09:06:22 PM »

Not that I can be much help but the Fat Bee Man near you in Lula vaporizes.  I think I saw a you tube video of his. You might want to check it out of better yet call him. He has always been willing to help me.

Good luck

David
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2013, 10:12:32 AM »

I consider 50 on a 24 hour natural drop to be small.  9 is virtually nothing.
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Michael Bush
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johng
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2013, 08:56:14 PM »

60 is the threshold for a 24hr drop. But, I would not want to see more than about 30-40 this time of year because they are going to multiply quickly now that the queens are laying more brood. I would do something to knock them back and then treat again after your flow.

17 is the threshold for a sugar shake or ether roll.

I would not use MAQs with daytime highs anywhere near 85, it can be hard on the brood and queens during warm weather.
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Finski
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« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2013, 03:03:06 AM »

.
This time of year the hive should be clean after treatments. If mites can reproduce freely, it will be destroyed in Autumn or even before.

In Scotland it has been researched that dead hives after winter appear when mite load is over 2000 mites.

How can we achieve that?

March  100 alive mites
April ....200
May.....400
June.....800 ...treshold over
July......1600
August 3000
September 6000

In October surely new cluster bees will be dead. Then the summer bees die and the hive will be empty

.

.
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Finski
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« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2013, 03:13:56 AM »

I consider 50 on a 24 hour natural drop to be small.  9 is virtually nothing.

Michael has his own theories about Varroa, and it is very different that US universities, Canada or European beekeepers.

Europe is over 10 years ahead of USA and Canada in varroa cure.
Best killing methods were selectid in European Union Varroa Group, and it took 10 years before Canada "accepted" the results. Reason must be so that Beekeeping Industry want to make business with medicines and that is why almost free methods will not be accepted. It is same in England.


Sad to read that this forum offers its "do nothing" style and beekeepers believe that.


It is said that there are mite resistant bee stocks. At least in Europe
it has been found that the the honey yield is so low that it is easier to treat mites thant nurse weak hives.

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Finski
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« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2013, 04:00:56 AM »

.


Bee Culture;4/1/2012, p6


ABSTRACT

The article focuses on the survey for the lost of bee colonies in New Jersey in winter 2010-2011 and the influence of Varroa destructor on their survival. The survey collects data on the number of colonies managed alive by New Jersey Beekeepers Association members on December 1, 2010 that survive until March 15, 2011. The survey reveals that 1,290 of the 1,939 colonies were reported alive on April 1, 2011. Moreover, 65% colony mortality was reported during non treatment of v. destructor.

Finski:
The most usual hive losses by mite are reduced colony size, delayed build up and so losses in honey yield.

But 2/3 dead hives, that is bad. The rest are not in good condition either.

-
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2013, 08:54:10 AM »

>Europe is over 10 years ahead of USA and Canada in varroa cure.

Interesting term, "cure".  It's been more than 10 years since I used any treatment for Varroa...
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Michael Bush
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Finski
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« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2013, 09:56:37 AM »

>Europe is over 10 years ahead of USA and Canada in varroa cure.

Interesting term, "cure".  It's been more than 10 years since I used any treatment for Varroa...

And you offer that to everybody. Big nonsense.
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brushwoodnursery
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« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2013, 08:14:49 AM »

Debates about treatment aside, thank you for the answers about numbers. I did treat last August with Hopguard and it seemed my colonies were invigorated in the fall. Loads of strong bees. No signs of difficulty. All three, even the small one, overwintered just fine. I will go ahead and use MAQS at the low dose now before the flow. My considerations are not economic since my yard is so small.
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