Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 17, 2014, 05:56:53 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: City beekeeping advice....  (Read 3785 times)
budhanes
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 45

Location: Westerville, Ohio


WWW
« on: November 21, 2005, 07:09:53 PM »

I live in the city, and would like to keep a beehive.  I have done alot of reading and research, but I cannot find answers to bee aggressivness. My backyard is 75 X 50 feet. I would like to keep a hive but am unsure of a few things. How far is the minimum to place bees from neighbors fences? Also, what about lawnmowers and weed-eaters? How close can a lawnmower be ran next to a beehive before the bees become upset and "scurry" about?  I don't want my nehbors upset that bees were "buzzing them" while they were out cutting the grass? I do have a spot next to a willow tree that will allow the hive to be somewhat hidden, but not totally out of view. The area I have picked out is not a very busy area in my yard or the neihbors, but they will be mowing within 10 -15 feet of the hive. Will this create any problems?
Logged

bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2005, 09:44:56 PM »

As far as distance from the neighbors, check your local and/or state codes.  The county court house may have that information for you.

Each week I mow past my hives (except now because of the winter oncoming).  I come two within 2 feet of them.  Granted I drive past at full speed (mainly to get out of their lines of flight) but they have never chased me down.  You can see them get a little excited but once I've pasted, they calm down.

Is the willow tree the "weeping willow"?  If so, that tree might not be the best place for your bees.  They are going to need sun for the majority of the day.  The weeping willow will may block a lot of their sun.
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13655


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2005, 10:37:51 PM »

I've had bees in town for many years.  Mostly, nice calm bees won't bother anyone who isn't opening the hive.  Bees sometimes turn agressive and at the first sign, I'd requeen.  If youc an keep the entrances facing away from the neighbors and towards one of your buildings it will help the flight path so the bees aren't so likely to run into people.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
TREBOR
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 194


Location: The State of Jefferson


WWW
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2005, 11:53:30 PM »

have you tried talking to them, your neighbers that is?
 make sure there is no one that is allergic.
 just a thought! Smiley
Logged

Dick Allen
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 163

Location: Anchorage


« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2005, 01:15:06 AM »

Anchorage has a city ordinance giving specific rules for keeping up to 4 hives on property in the city.  One of them is the bees are to be kept at least 25 feet from any adjacent lot line.  That puts a pretty decent distance buffer between bees and the neighbors.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13655


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2005, 07:23:40 AM »

Personally I think the fear of the bees will be far worse.  I don't tell the neighbors until the bees have been there most of the year and I take them a jar of honey.  By then they already haven't noticed.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
qa33010
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 912


Location: Arkansas, White County


« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2005, 04:12:10 AM »

I let my neighbors know as soon as I decided I was going to keep bees.  They have all had a taste of honey and can't wait until next year when I hopefully will have honey for them (a jar each).

When I told them I didn't come across as hard or wishy washy.  I just told them this is something I've wanted to do since I was seven years old and now I had a chance to finally do it after forty years of waiting.  I also have tried in the past to cultivate a positive relationship, though not always successful (some folks just have to be antagonistic or rubbing someone wrong).  The old adage "...there's a way to tell people something and a way to tell them and hack them off..." definitely applies.  

Fortunately a yellow jacket came by during one of these conversations and attacked the neighbor (new across the street) and I was able to explain that this was not a honeybee and also, after killing it, showed the retractable stinger and explained the difference.

By the way I can spit across my back yard.  Good Luck!!

David
Logged

Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
budhanes
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 45

Location: Westerville, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2005, 06:29:42 AM »

Sounds like it may be ok to do done correctly! What about the lawnmower. Will I need a veil each time I cut my grass around the hive?
Logged

thegolfpsycho
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 583

Location: canyon rim, ut


« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2005, 06:35:35 AM »

I wouldn't linger around the entrances with a mower or weedwhacker.  Also ensure the discharge chute and exhaust point away from the entrances.  It tends to excite them sometimes
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13655


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2005, 07:23:37 AM »

Need?  Maybe not, but I'd wear it just in case.  The lawnmower is more likely than most things to irratate them and sooner or later you'll catch them on a bad day.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Diver
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 41

Location: Colchester England


« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2005, 07:39:08 AM »

There is another possibility. Can you raise the hive up.  Do you have a flat roof with access, a garage roof, or a balcony.  By raising the flight path there are a lot less problems with the neighbours, mowers etc. as the bees will mainly be flying above head height in the local vicinity.  Just one thing. ensure that whatever, can carry the weight of the hive when full plus your weight for when you tend the hive. A fall from height is dangerous and you would not want a hive-full of angry bees to deal with as well.
As to telling the neighbours. I would always tell them (not ask). Explaining what having the bees will mean to them emphasising the positives; of better pollination etc. If you need permission from the authorities, then get that first. This will reinforce your talks with the neighbours.
Logged

listen to others. You do not always know as much as you think you do.
amymcg
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 458


Location: Eastern Massachusetts


WWW
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2005, 01:07:03 PM »

another thing with the mower. You could close off the entrance the night before you mow, then open it back up after you are done mowing.  

That being said, I have never done that and have weed eated and mowed extensively around my hive right up to the entrance without any problems.
Logged
Apis629
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 823


Location: Florida


WWW
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2005, 10:21:43 PM »

For my hive I pushed it up about 6 inches from the house giving them 40 feet of flying disance from teh house to the street.   Back there I just put down some shingles to keep the grass from growing up and since they're behind a flower bed I never have to come within 10 feet with a lawn mower.  I've never had to wear a veil when moing the lawn but, once when I was weeding a bee got caught in my glasses and stung me in teh temple.  Oh well, I guess things with engines aren't the only hazard.
Logged

Anonymous
Guest
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2005, 08:28:30 AM »

Hi, Bud.  Got your PM by the way.

You'll be interested to know that, in the Columbus area, the only place you have any legal restrictions on keeping bees is in Dublin.

As far as your neighbors are concerned, the above posts have given some pretty good advice.  I know two beekeepers in Bexley that have bees right next to their neighbors lot line.  It just matters which direction you point the hive and how close to your hive your neighbors might get.  Strategically places bushs or board fencing can really help divert bees up and over human travel paths.

Talk to your neighbors about allergies?  Mm, maybe not.  The first thing non-beekeepers will tell you is that they are alergic.  Most people arent'.  But because they get a "reaction" to bee venom (and they should) they think they are alergic and no amount of educating can change their minds.  Unless you're really good friends with your neighbors, I'd not mention it.  IMHO.

Oh, a quick word about cutting grass.  The BEST time to cut grass is late in the day, whether you're a beekeeper or not.  It's less stressful for your lawn.  If you cut the part around your hives last, it'll hopefully be getting dark and the bees won't be as active.  Just don't loiter around the entrance too much.  And some mowers/weed eaters seem to bother bees more than others.  You'll figure it out pretty quick.   rolleyes  cheesy

Good luck!  Talk to you soon.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13655


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2005, 11:38:36 AM »

I've hardly met a non beekeeper who doesn't think they are allergic.  I would just ask to see their epipen.  If they don't have one, then they are either negligent about their own safety or they are not at all allergic.  EVERYONE has a reaction to bee stings.  That's normal.  People who break out in hives ALL OVER or have trouble breathing probably really are.  If they break out in hives at the site of the sting, that's normal.

I find that trying to reason with people about things they are apt be irationally afraid of is only asking for problems.  I would NOT talk to the neighbors before getting a hive.  Odds are, if you place it in a discrete location it will be a year before any of them notice and by then they will realize they have not been accosted by the bees.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
thegolfpsycho
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 583

Location: canyon rim, ut


« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2005, 05:07:58 PM »

I started keeping bees in my back yard and expanded into other peoples back yards cheesy  

I didn't advertise when I started and they went unnoticed until I made a couple splits.  By then, the neighbors must have realized they weren't a hazard, or that getting by the man-eating dog in the yard to complain would be even more dangerous.!!

Older people that know fruit and vegetables don't grow at the supermarket are much more accepting of the bees.  I have freinds that requested I put bees in their yards to help with their gardens.  We did it the same way, quietly.  The only problem I have had in many years, is with a neighbor I constantly battle over many other pointless things.  A swarm clustered on the rafters of her new addition.  She was a little excited. I took a bucket, bee brush, and modified shop vac, and QUIETLY hauled them away.  Haven't heard from her since.
Logged
budhanes
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 45

Location: Westerville, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2005, 10:54:22 AM »

Alot of good advice here. As far as advising the neighbors that I am considering putting a beehive out, I'd really rather not.  I'm starting to think that they will probably never know. I feel to tell them ahead of time, and lack of knowledge would make them uncomfortable. All the publicity of AHB's on tv isn't helping either. Might as well tell them that I am putting a snake pit in the back yard and stocking it with rattlers and cobra's... Thanks for all the input. This thread kinda releived my tension of putting them in the back yard in the spring...
Logged

Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13655


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2005, 11:01:44 AM »

> I'm starting to think that they will probably never know.

Sooner or later someone will see you with a veil or a bee jacket on and they will catch on that something is up.  But other than that, they probably won't notice if you put it somewhere discrete.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Dick Allen
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 163

Location: Anchorage


« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2005, 02:15:11 PM »

Before getting my first bees here, I set up some hive boxes in my backyard a couple of weeks before arrival of the packages. A few days after setting up the hives, I saw one of my neighbors in his back yard, so went over the fence for some neighborly, unimportant b.s.ing.  While we were talking I mentioned to him that I would have some bees for my hives in about a week. He was surprised that I was going to have bees and actually thought the hive boxes I'd set up were compost bins since I grow a few veggies in my yard too.

From time to time during the summer I'd see him and he'd usually ask how the bees were doing, etc. And, of course, he'd ask if I ever got stung. From his questions, it seemed he was somewhat interested in bees.

One day, while I was in my garage,  his two little girls were playing out in their back yard, and I heard him say to them: "Hey, get away from that fence, he's got those goddam bees over there, you know!"

Although, my bees never harrassed him, I guess he still preferred that they weren't next door to him.   He did enjoy the free jar of honey I gave to him at season's end though.
Logged
budhanes
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 45

Location: Westerville, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2005, 04:58:52 PM »

Actually, until this summer I had a homemade composte bin in the backyard. It started rotting, so I cut it apart and threw it out. Interesting concept, maybe if I had "another" homemade composte bin. "It got taken over by the bees, and since they didn't do much harm, I decided to keep them"...
Logged

Anonymous
Guest
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2005, 05:16:55 PM »

Quote from: budhanes
Might as well tell them that I am putting a snake pit in the back yard and stocking it with rattlers and cobra's...

Hey, there's already an alligator living in Clintonville...   rolleyes  cheesy

Make sure you check out www.centralohiobeekeepers.com for class information.
Logged
Apis629
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 823


Location: Florida


WWW
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2005, 08:13:22 PM »

Hey, Golfpsycho...I'm following in beekeeping much the same way.  Ever since a few people at my church learned that I keep bees I've had people left and right asking me to put a hive or two on their property.  I've already made a second hive in my first year and I have 3 more people who want me to put bees in their yards.  Obviously, I make sure they know what they're getting into...
Logged

Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.022 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page August 22, 2014, 03:10:53 AM
anything