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Author Topic: I developed a rash, am I alergic?  (Read 804 times)
ThePlot
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« on: March 04, 2013, 01:26:04 PM »

Hello fellow bee enthusiasts,

So I was stung for the second time of my life this weekend when I got to work with a beekeeper. I was fine the night i was stung. I was stung on saturday night. Its now monday and I have reddness/rash on my arm where I was stung. It is a little larger than a quarter in size. Is this a sign that I may be alergic, or is it a natural reaction as my body get used to being stung?


I really hope it's not alergies as I feel i have found a hobby/potential profession I would really enjoy.
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2013, 01:39:54 PM »

it sounds like a local reaction, not a systemic allergy.  you may or may not get used to sting.  you may have no reaction for years and then die.  no one can tell you that.

i always recommend that people keep some benadryl handy.  i like the liquid.  if you have concerns or worsening reactions, it's worth it to talk to your doc and get a couple of epi-pens.  lots of us keep them, just in case.
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ThePlot
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2013, 01:43:22 PM »

Yes, it is definately localized. PHEW!!!! thank goodness!!m I'll carry an epi-pen handy just in case.

What a relief!
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fshrgy99
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2013, 01:46:17 PM »

Hello ThePlot,
I copied and pasted this from WebMD.com

Understanding Bee Sting Allergies -- Symptoms

What Are the Symptoms of a Bee Sting Allergy?

Symptoms of bee sting allergy with anaphylactic shock may include:
Rapid swelling around the eyes, lips, tongue, or throat. Difficulty breathing and/or swallowing.
Wheezing or hoarseness. Itching. Dizziness. A reddish rash or hives.
Stomach cramps. Loss of consciousness. Diarrhea. Nausea.

In most cases, a bee or wasp sting causes only minor symptoms at the site of the sting, including:

Pain, Swelling, Redness, Itching or Burning
 
Understanding Bee Sting Allergies

Call Your Doctor About a Sting Allergy If:
You are stung and develop any of the symptoms of anaphylactic shock. Get medical help immediately.
You are allergic to bee or wasp stings and you are stung. You are at risk of anaphylactic shock. Even if your reaction to previous stings was mild, you may need emergency treatment.

You think you might have had an allergic reaction to a sting in the past. Your doctor can test to see if you have an allergy to bee stings or are at risk for anaphylaxis.


If you are concerned enough to ask about it I suggest you get tested. My buddy got me into beekeeping. It turned out he was allergic and he has been seeing his Doc and building up his immunity. He had been stung in the forehead and ended up with swelling in his face and an eruption on his top lip, luckily not life threatening for him ... that time.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2013, 02:06:48 PM »

Sounds pretty normal to me Plot, at least if you call me normal. Wink

Depending upon where I get stung, it will swell up for a few days and itch.  If stung where there isn't much blood flow, then mostly just itch.  

Not to belittle anybodies reactions, but I think it's when you get a more systematic response (like hives) that you need to pay a lot more attention.  As KathyP suggests, and we all know, a sting can be deadly.
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Bush_84
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2013, 02:22:24 PM »

Even if you had a large local reaction it would not increase your chances of anaphylaxis.  You are good to go!
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bud1
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2013, 05:17:36 PM »

don't worry after an hour unless you aren't breathing; and then i don't think you will worry either
 i swear i just cant believe this and only second sting of your life. i am sorry but just cant devlope any sympathy
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Jeanette
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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2013, 10:46:41 PM »

I seem to remember that a life-threatening allergic reaction has about 9 hour window. The initial response within the first hour and a secondary spike at about the 8 hour mark.

As for a long-lasting rash and itchiness, it might simply be your body's normal histamine response. My body thinks a mosquito bite is worthy of a week's discomfort. You might like to try cool or luke-warm showers (instead of hot) as heat tends to increases histamine production.
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Jeanette
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RHBee
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2013, 01:58:26 AM »

I got stung 5 days ago on the back of my hand near the wrist. My hand swelled to the point that it was difficult to make a fist. My wife was worried that I was developing a harsher reaction to stings. A couple of benadryl later the swelling went down enough to be comfortable.
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Ray
Bush_84
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« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2013, 07:26:59 AM »

Even if you had a large local reaction it would not increase your chances of anaphylaxis.  You are good to go!
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Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.
10framer
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« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2013, 09:35:39 AM »

i got stung 6 or 7 times sunday and one sting on the underside of my forearm had some swelling and it was a little enflamed.  no reaction to the rest.  that particular stinger stayed in long enough to pump out the venom sacs because i had my hands full.  that along with the fact that that is a somewhat tender spot probably caused the local reaction.
if you got stung two or three days ago and you're still typing today i think you're going to pull through.  keep the epi around until you're more comfortable with getting stung and are more sure of how your body reacts.  i've been stung thousands of times in my life and i still keep benydril with me just in case.
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Bush_84
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« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2013, 10:41:13 PM »

It's not a bad idea to keep an epipen around just as long as you know when I use it and when not to.  Again a large local reaction can be uncomfortable and make you nervous, but it does not change your odds of anaphylaxis than any other person in the world. 
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Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.
tryintolearn
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« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2013, 09:04:42 AM »

my fiance decided to be a participant on Saturday.  i gave her plenty of warning that her Capri's pants were not a good idea.  she donned the beekeeper jacket and hood and gloves.  again i said that's not a good idea.  five Min's later i had to walk behind her for forty yards swiping off the stinging 50 or so on her behind....ouch.    she had the usual redness and itching and is still asking me if shes allergic.
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hardwood
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« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2013, 06:37:00 PM »

Always nice when you can smack your lady's behind and get away with it grin

Scott
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Jim 134
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« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2013, 05:55:33 AM »

I seem to remember that a life-threatening allergic reaction has about 9 hour window. The initial response within the first hour and a secondary spike at about the 8 hour mark.

As for a long-lasting rash and itchiness, it might simply be your body's normal histamine response. My body thinks a mosquito bite is worthy of a week's discomfort. You might like to try cool or luke-warm showers (instead of hot) as heat tends to increases histamine production.

ThePlot.......

IMHO I can not answer your original question you need to go to a Dr. To get tested for that.

   I to not know if these time limits are correct I do know if you use an
Epi-pen you need an ambulance on the way or a ride to the hospital HOW.  So called 911 and be on your way to the ER. The ER will need to know how many Epi-pen you used and how much the dose was so bring or give the empty Epi-pen to the ER or give them to the EMT.
 
All Epi-pen will do is give you some time.

IMHO I can not answer your original question you need to go to a Dr. To get tested for that.

And yes I have used Epi-pen on other people with bee stings.

  I have been keeping bees for over 50 years and have been stung 1,000s of times.
       


              BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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