Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 26, 2014, 02:10:12 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Sugar candy with pollen patty  (Read 700 times)
Bush_84
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 348

Location: Brainerd, MN


« on: February 26, 2013, 10:24:46 PM »

I was reading a blog today about making hard candy with protein powder mixed in.  I am thinking of trying hard candy due to my fondant getting runny and out of curiosity as to if hard candy is taken better than dry sugar.  It is even better if I can mix in my protein supplement into the candy.  Anybody have experience with this?  I have been thinking of ways to feed dry sugar and a protein patty at the same time and this may be the solution, but I want to see if others have tried.
Logged

Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2013, 02:41:19 AM »

Absolutely, it will not work.  Patty itself has 50% sugar that it will not ferment. Idea is that bees eate patty as much as possible, that they make more brood. Patty must be soft that bees can bite it with their jaws.  I use in patties fructose that it suck moisture from air and keeps patty soft.

At same time they use sugar as much as they need energy.

Bees need not dry sugar or candy at same time. If their stores are low in the hive, only wise way is to give 60% sugar syrup.
Using hard sugar they must carry lots of water into the hive. It is vain work.

If hive has allready enough honey stores, more sugar only fills brood combs.



But it is easy to try yourself what happens. One human life is not enough to try everything what guys write in internet with their "fresh thinking".

 .
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 04:11:22 AM by Finski » Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
dfizer
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 288

Location: Ballston Spa, New York


« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2013, 08:14:32 AM »

Do bees take the sugar and store it away in open comb?  My hive is relatively heavy yet when I fed a honey ball they took it down like it was nothing... in two days it was gone which led me to believe that they were hungry but I really don't think that's the case given how heavy the hives are... I guess they took it and stored it away...

David
Logged
danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2271


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2013, 08:23:26 AM »

I made several hundred pounds of candy with  mega bee in it.  about 150 bricks.  each colony got 2 last oct/nov
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2013, 08:25:30 AM »


Bees are not hungry but they have a habit to keep the hive clean. They think that sugar's or honey's place is in combs and not everywhere.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2013, 08:31:16 AM »

I made several hundred pounds of candy with  mega bee in it.  about 150 bricks.  each colony got 2 last oct/nov

Why don't you feed to hives full of 1:2 syrup?
Dry sugar feeding in autumn has no idea.
Bees move into combs 10 kg sugar a day as syrup.
Idea is to be fast that they do not continue brooding with continuous feeding.

Megabee is protein product for brooding. To feed it in autumn is a bad thing.
And those bees which feed larvae, will die before winter.
.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2271


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2013, 08:41:00 AM »

I made several hundred pounds of candy with  mega bee in it.  about 150 bricks.  each colony got 2 last oct/nov

Why don't you feed to hives full of 1:2 syrup?
Dry sugar feeding in autumn has no idea.
Bees move into combs 10 kg sugar a day as syrup.
Idea is to be fast that they do not continue brooding with continuous feeding.

Megabee is protein product for brooding. To feed it in autumn is a bad thing.
And those bees which feed larvae, will die before winter.
.

I dont feed much 2 -1 because I leave alot of honey for there winter feed.  The candy never gets touched in autumn because they are clustered below eating honey.  The candy is for the colony that eats it way to the cover.  It keeps it alive long enough for me to get to them.  The candy doesn't have alot of protein in it.   Its just alittle bit better balance emergency diet
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 09:56:40 AM by danno » Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2013, 08:59:26 AM »



I dont feed much 2 -1 because I leave alot of honey for there winter feed.  The candy never gets touched in autumn because they are clustered below eating honey.  The candy is for the colony that eats it way to the cover.  It keeps the alive long enough for me to get to them.  The candy doesn't have alot of protein in it.   Its just alittle bit better balance emergency diet

OK, you have so much hives that you know what to do.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2013, 09:18:19 AM »

Nah, he just does it different Finski, like many other beeks.   

"different strokes for different beeks."  cool cool cool

Not every beek in the World 'takes all honey in the Fall' and feeds sugar (dry or syrup) all winter as Finski likes to advise.  Many beeks instead "try" to leave their bees enough honey, adding candy boards, honey balls, dry sugar, whatever as "insurance" not necessarily meant to be their winter feeding. 

Most years half my colonies never end up touching the stuff "because" they were left enough honey.

Some beeks consider the particular practice of 'taking all the honey and replacing it with sugar' neglectfully abhorant  shocked
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
beeman2009
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 61


Location: Portland,Tennessee


« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2013, 09:35:57 AM »

I've read a lot about these " honey balls " but don't find any recipes to make them. Anyone willing to share? Sounds interesting and I would like to try them.

Thanks   th_thumbsupup
Logged

All things may be lawful, but not all things are advantageous.

Beeman2009
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2013, 10:27:17 AM »

Nah, he just does it different Finski, like many other beeks.   

"different strokes for different beeks."  cool cool cool

Not every beek in the World 'takes all honey in the Fall' and feeds sugar (dry or syrup) all winter as Finski likes to advise.  Many beeks instead "try" to leave their bees enough honey, adding candy boards, honey balls, dry sugar, whatever as "insurance" not necessarily meant to be their winter feeding. 

Most years half my colonies never end up touching the stuff "because" they were left enough honey.

Some beeks consider the particular practice of 'taking all the honey and replacing it with sugar' neglectfully abhorant  shocked

You should write a beekeeping book, "How not to do like Finski"

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2013, 10:40:28 AM »

I've read a lot about these " honey balls " but don't find any recipes to make them. Anyone willing to share? Sounds interesting and I would like to try them.

Thanks   th_thumbsupup

Well, the credit belongs to BlueBee.  That's where I learned of them.  Basically you need some reputable honey, either your own or someone you know (no store bought, you just don't know what's in that stuff), add honey to dry sugar until the consistency allows you to form balls.  There you go.  have fun.
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2013, 10:43:50 AM »

Nah, he just does it different Finski, like many other beeks.   

"different strokes for different beeks."  cool cool cool

Not every beek in the World 'takes all honey in the Fall' and feeds sugar (dry or syrup) all winter as Finski likes to advise.  Many beeks instead "try" to leave their bees enough honey, adding candy boards, honey balls, dry sugar, whatever as "insurance" not necessarily meant to be their winter feeding. 

Most years half my colonies never end up touching the stuff "because" they were left enough honey.

Some beeks consider the particular practice of 'taking all the honey and replacing it with sugar' neglectfully abhorant  shocked

You should write a beekeeping book, "How not to do like Finski"

.

Interesting title  grin  There's certainly a lot of data in the achieves  Wink  One could probably write two books.
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13759


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2013, 10:48:36 AM »

It seems to me that bees need sugar when they need sugar, and pollen when they need pollen.  Mixing it just makes more work for them to sort things out.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4270

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2013, 10:58:26 AM »

How about this for a book:  "How to keep poly hives from turning into bee freezers 101."  Wink

In response to the original question, I did try to feed my bees a mixture of honey and protein powder (whey) a couple weeks ago and they snubbed their nose at it.  



I may give Whey another chance if/when we warm up a bit more and the snow melts.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2013, 11:31:56 AM »

How about this for a book:  "How to keep poly hives from turning into bee freezers 101."  Wink



That is secret knowledge and only Michigan beekeepers know how to do it.


This video knows the answer but it does not tell.

Weird Michigan Bee Hive Behavior



Michigan style

Fox Blocks Insulation of Hives



.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 11:54:58 AM by Finski » Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.801 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page October 06, 2014, 07:23:40 AM
anything