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Author Topic: Question on ordering bees in ny  (Read 1122 times)
tbrinck
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« on: February 17, 2013, 07:46:07 PM »

The closest place to me to order bees from is hudsonvalleybeesupply. The bees come from georgia and are 1st avaible in late april. Now from what i have read is that bees with northern raised queens stand a better chance of surviving through the winter in NY. So my question is should i order a new queen for the same day the package arrives and just switch the boxes or wait till they are ready for 1st super than replace the queen? Thanks for the help
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tbrinck
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« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2013, 07:48:43 PM »

I am planning on starting with one hive so I want to give the bees the best chance of surving the winter.
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Joe D
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2013, 08:08:08 PM »

Generally they recommend 2 but thats up to you.  Check into a local bee club, you may find bees and a queen from your area.  Good luck



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iddee
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2013, 09:37:16 PM »

www.nsqba.com
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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tbrinck
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2013, 11:18:51 PM »

I found a local bee keeper thats selling nucs of Minnesota hygienic Italian  and new world carnolians. I am leaning towards the Minnesota hygienic Italians. Ive been considering letting them re-queen themselves when the time comes in an attempt to keep their traits, unless I end up not liking them. Would this be a good or bad idea?
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Robo
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2013, 01:51:46 PM »

I think you'll have a hard time finding northern bred queens that early, so you would be better getting nothern nucs or just requeen when northern queens become available.   I'm not a fan of emergency queens if that is what you are referring to -> http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/can-you-afford-emergency-queens/
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skatesailor
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« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2013, 06:56:36 PM »

http://whiteoakapiary.com/
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tbrinck
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« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2013, 08:51:35 PM »

Ok so now i have a choice of getting the nuc with either an overwintered queen or a queen from this year with the latter opton avaible a month later. i am looking for the pros and cons of each. Thanks
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 09:05:04 AM by tbrinck » Logged
Michael Bush
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« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2013, 09:58:55 AM »

The "con" to nucs are really just if the nuc is not on the frame size, or cell size, or comb size you want.  In other words, if you can buy a nuc that is the size and comb type you want a nuc is probably the best.  But if you want mediums, you have to find a medium depth nuc.  If you want small cell, you'd need to find a small cell nuc.  If you want a top bar hive, you need either combs that fit your top bar hive.  If you can't get these, then a package is the best.  The bees will build on the size frame you give them and you'll have bees in the right equipment.
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Michael Bush
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tbrinck
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« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2013, 10:13:52 AM »

Are there any disadvantages to getting a nuc with an overwintered queen vs a newer queen?
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johng
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« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2013, 10:29:30 AM »

Not that I can think of. Most overwintered nucs do very well.
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tbrinck
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« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2013, 10:35:07 AM »

Thanks for your help   grin
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iddee
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« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2013, 07:53:41 PM »

IMHO, an overwintered queen born in the fall is an advantage. You can see her laying pattern and what her offspring are like, if she over wintered in the nuc, or was pulled with frames from her hive to make the nuc. I would prefer to have a proven queen than a newly mated, unproven one.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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tbrinck
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« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2013, 09:31:47 PM »

Thats what i was thinking as well, was not sure if the overwintered queen would have a higher chance of swarming in the first year. I am planning on giving the hive a decent amount of space starting with just one deep 8 frame. Once they have most of that filled (I figure pretty quickly) Ill add the second deep 8 frame. Than once that was mostly full I was planning on adding a med super with a queen separator between the super and the top brood box. I am hoping that I can hold their swarming tendencies off till next year, since im planning on starting with one hive. I have been considering getting or making a wooden nuc box or a top bar hive just in case they swarm early. I am planning on getting an additional 8 frame hive next year.
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iddee
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« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2013, 11:50:46 PM »

Do NOT add a queen excluder under foundation. Add the super, let them start drawing and storing, then add the excluder.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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derekm
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« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2013, 07:17:44 AM »

The  honey bee evolved into separate sub species during the glacial and inter glacial periods to cope with differing climates. The most northerly sub species (AMM) went as far north as the limit of deciduos trees. I would suggest given the climate of NY upstate (with its decidous forests but cold winters)  that you went for either a captured feral swarm,  one with a significant amount of AMM or from a supplier who overwinters his breeding stock in a state with a similar climate.
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If they increased energy bill for your home by a factor of 4.5 would you consider that cruel? If so why are you doing that to your bees?
Michael Bush
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« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2013, 01:24:13 PM »

>Are there any disadvantages to getting a nuc with an overwintered queen vs a newer queen?

Brother Adam of Buckfast Abbey, always said a queen does her best work in her second year.  I would consider an overwintered queen an advantage in many ways, not the least of which is that she has proven she and her bees can survive the winter...
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Michael Bush
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tbrinck
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« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2013, 09:31:28 AM »

new question i can get all supplies needed for 2 deep, 2 medium 8 frame setup, and nuc box for around $280. (including wired frames, embeding board and spur embeder) from a local supplier
or
same as above but with pierco frames, and nuc box a little cheaper $277

for a beginner bee keeper which would be better?
I am going to only have one hive to start with till next year, unless they decide they must split before end of year in which case i was going to put them into a nuc box till next spring.
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tbrinck
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« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2013, 10:03:41 AM »

now its looking like a good possibility that i might be able to do two hives, all 8 frame one with local nuc treatment free, the other with package bees. Planning on requeening the package with a treatment free queen as soon as i can. Figured for protection i was going to be a breeze jacket with veil combo. Was originally going to get the full suit but figured a jacket and veil would be fine, what would i wear for pants to protect from bee stings? Canvas overalls? Still trying to decide between plastic or wired frames.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 10:24:01 AM by tbrinck » Logged
iddee
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« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2013, 10:45:48 AM »

Plastic needs experienced beek.

Blue Jeans are sufficient if you protect the ankles.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
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