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Author Topic: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection  (Read 7315 times)

Offline Rurification

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Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« on: February 16, 2013, 07:40:13 AM »
Here's the full report on our winter deadout.   

http://rurification.blogspot.com/2013/02/deadout.html

A pic from the post:


Online kathyp

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2013, 10:39:10 PM »
 that's a good post and good postmortem.  don't feel bad.  no matter how long we do this, we are going to have some losses that surprise us.  i know how you feel about losing a good hive.  i still feel bad about one i lost a couple of years ago and it was my fault for not verifying a queen before winter.  they had replaced the one they had and my guess is that the new one didn't make it back.

live and learn......
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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Online sawdstmakr

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2013, 01:27:59 AM »
Nice write up Robin. This will help me and other I'm sure.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline Georgia Boy

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2013, 01:23:14 AM »
Thanks Robin,

As a soon to be new beek I need all the information I can get.

I really am sorry for the loss of you hive.

Losing hives scares me the most.

Good luck this year.

David
"Give it All You've Got"
"Never give up. Never surrender."

Offline Stromnessbees

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2013, 06:59:30 AM »
Hi Robin

I'm afraid, your hive died from CCD, caused by neonicotinoid poisoning.

The bees collect these systemic pesticides in summer with their forage, and then the colony dwindles away to next to nothing in the winter, the remainder of the bees dies from the cold.

Maybe it's only your strongest colony affected, as they might have discovered a contaminated food source too far away for the others to exploit.

Please try to identify the source of the toxin, it could be seed treated crops, pesticide trenched orchards or lawn treated parks and golf courses.

You might want to join the campaign to get these pesticides banned.

Offline Moots

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2013, 07:45:32 AM »
Hi Robin

I'm afraid, your hive died from CCD, caused by neonicotinoid poisoning.

The bees collect these systemic pesticides in summer with their forage, and then the colony dwindles away to next to nothing in the winter, the remainder of the bees dies from the cold.

Maybe it's only your strongest colony affected, as they might have discovered a contaminated food source too far away for the others to exploit.

Please try to identify the source of the toxin, it could be seed treated crops, pesticide trenched orchards or lawn treated parks and golf courses.

You might want to join the campaign to get these pesticides banned.

Other theories Stromnessbess is also pursuing....
neonicotinoid poisoning is also responsible for the following:

World hunger
Mitt Romney losing the Presidential election
The Pope stepping down
The BP Horizon rig disaster
Hurricane Katrina
The 911 terrorist attacks

Just to name a few.  :-D





"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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Offline Rurification

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2013, 08:12:44 AM »
Hi Robin

I'm afraid, your hive died from CCD, caused by neonicotinoid poisoning.

The bees collect these systemic pesticides in summer with their forage, and then the colony dwindles away to next to nothing in the winter, the remainder of the bees dies from the cold.

Maybe it's only your strongest colony affected, as they might have discovered a contaminated food source too far away for the others to exploit.

Please try to identify the source of the toxin, it could be seed treated crops, pesticide trenched orchards or lawn treated parks and golf courses.

You might want to join the campaign to get these pesticides banned.

That's an interesting diagnosis, but aren't CCD hives usually abandoned?   This one clearly wasn't.   Following Occam's razor, there's a lot of evidence that other things besides CCD played a big part in the deadout - like winter, highly variable temperatures, robbing, small cluster size.   

I'm no fan of neonics - and we're in Indiana, so there's plenty of experimental corn, etc in our county, but not within 5 miles of us.   Also, all of the corn around us died last year because of the drought, so I really don't think that's what happened here.

Offline Stromnessbees

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2013, 10:20:11 AM »
Depending on other circumstances, deadouts caused by neonics don't all look the same.

If the maize is grown about 5 miles away, it would explain why only the strongest colony collapsed, as smaller ones don't forage as far away.

Anyway, please keep your eyes open about this topic and try to talk with neighboring beekeepers about the problem, to see if their experiences are similar and if the ones closer to the maize are affected more than others.

Offline Stromnessbees

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2013, 09:35:01 AM »
... and please let us know if you can find out any more information.

More photographs or even a short video of deadouts are most welcome!

Online buzzbee

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2013, 06:54:31 PM »
If it is too cold in the hive because of a small cluster and too much open space in the hive,it is very hard for bees move even a small distance to stores.You should have your mite population knocked way back in August before they start raisng the bees that will overwinter. If they are sick going into fall they may perish even with good numbers and good stores.When the queen slows laying in the fall,if there is any kind of mite load at all they attach themselves to the bees since there is no brood to go into.
In the fall,all empty combs should be removed and bees confined to the tightest quarters possible.
Most cases off ccd the bees usually won't touch the remains in the hive. I think your dysentary and robbing in the fall gave you more problems than any thing else. And if you were queenless or had a failed queen your cluster would have done nothing but decrease in size to the point of no return. The bees usually raise small  patches of brood now and then through winter to maintain numbers.

Offline fshrgy99

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2013, 08:23:26 PM »
Excellent report and post. Very thorough and extremely well presented. My condolences on the loss of the hive. Hopefully your analysis is correct and the experience will give you greater insight into the care of your hives in the future. All the best.
Dennis

Offline Hohoei11

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Re: Blog Post: Deadout Inspection
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2013, 04:14:22 AM »
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