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Author Topic: Rookie mistake , But now I see  (Read 2680 times)
TwT
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Galactic Bee
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Ted


« on: November 10, 2005, 04:10:19 PM »

well I had a medium super on a hive in a yard with six hives, it only had 2 frames with honey capped (1/4 frame on single sides) , so I wanted to store this super with all the frames, so I did it thinking that I would be ok, I scrached the capped honey open and put it on a stool about 75 feet from the hives and 30 minutes later I went to see if the hives would clean up the frames and that be that , well when I went to look , they were covering the frames so I thought good but when I looked over at the hives I seen bee's covering the front of 4 hives so I put a vail on and some were fighting, ( trying to rob I think) so I went and got entrance reducers for every hive and installed them, guest I wasn't thinking it through because i thought everything would be ok that for from the hive's, but 1 good thing I caugh it fast and all hives are very strong so I dont think anything bad will happen to any of them but I will inspect in the morning just to make sure, hope I caugh it all in time. well lesson learned and will just freeze the honey next time, the sky in the pasture is full of bee's. It can be tough sometimes when your stupid, but I learn fast. my ole man told me "if your going to be stupid you better be tough", guest most heard that before
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THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2005, 04:27:05 PM »

As I have said before, I guess my bees are weird.

On the hive stand I have, you've seen the pictures, the 2X6 rails are wide enough apart they can be used as a frame holder. Just set the frames in there and the bees have access to them. This is right beside the hives. I removed some partially capped, mostly uncapped frames about a week ago and set the frames in the hive stand. While there were many bees on the combs, and some pushing and shoving going on on the combs, there were no indications of robbing. There is no kind of flow going on right now.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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Ted


« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2005, 06:06:04 PM »

guest your bee's are wierd jerry, because it didn't happen that way here!!!
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THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

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Amateurs built the ark,
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Finsky
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« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2005, 09:01:06 PM »

Yu may put it on the top inside box over the inner cover. Bees move it down into the hive.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2005, 11:54:14 PM »

A lot of this is the time of year.  Anything, including syrup and especially honey can set off a robbing frenzy in a dearth.  You probably would have gotten away with it a month or two ago.
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manowar422
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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2005, 02:58:33 PM »

I had this same thing happen to me this summer. In my case the frames
in question were deeps that were badly warped, only partially drawn
and I was going to throw out anyway so I was not concerned.
I placed them at the base of the hive and soon they were covered with bees.







The bees chewed the wax cells to tiny bits in their efforts to carry off the honey on the frames.
The bits of wax were scattered everywhere around the frames when it was all over.
The whole thing took about 90 min.  shocked

The frames I was keeping for future use were placed over the inner cover
(thanks to the advice I recieved here on the forum) and those frames are coming off this afternoon.
The cells are squeeky clean and still intact. Cheesy
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2005, 04:28:28 PM »

Ninety Minutes? shocked  shocked

My frames sat out for days with the help of wasp, flies, and who knows what other creatures. And the combs can still be used. I have some really laid back bees.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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manowar422
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« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2005, 07:37:46 PM »

Quote
My frames sat out for days with the help of wasp, flies, and who knows what other creatures. And the combs can still be used. I have some really laid back bees


Jerrymac,
Do you have the only hives within a 50 mile radius?
Or perhaps there's a pharmaceutical production facility close
by and your bees are hooked on Valium cheesy
It must be nice not to have worries about your hives ever
being robbed. Cool
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Ted


« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2005, 10:59:28 PM »

a hour after I started this post , everything is normal at the hives now and they are cleaning out the frames good , they are done now so all is well from the looks at the hive entrances.
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THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

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Amateurs built the ark,
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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2005, 01:27:07 AM »

I had frames with in 15 feet of 3 hives and had no robbing, It just depends on the bees. Smiley
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2005, 01:34:48 PM »

Quote from: manowar422
The whole thing took about 90 min.


wow shocked

Thanks for linking me up to this thread manowar. That's really interesting. For everyone else, I've just created a thread on a rather interesting honey super clearing technique. No escape boards, no blowers, just sit the full honey supers sideways on top of the hive.

If you want to know what I'm talking about check out my thread:

http://www.beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=4060

Cheers,
James.
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Careful, my pets can smell your hives. Cool
manowar422
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« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2006, 07:01:57 PM »

I wanted to breath life into this thread and post some
mildly interesting personal findings about setting off
robbing in the bee yard.

I have some plastic deep pierco frames that I
intend to trade to a friend. They happen to
have a small amount of capped honey on them
so I extracted them.
I wanted the bees to clean the rest of the honey
from them... Cool

Yesterday I placed 5 frames in a deep box resting
on the ground out of sight of the hives
(opposite side of the large work shed) and no problems
 they cleaned them right up Smiley

But TODAY I wanted to watch the action and placed the deep
with 5 more frames about 20 feet in front of the hive's entrances.

The result was a frenzy of pretty major proportions! shocked
Befor it was all over, my poor golden retriever got stung on
the nose cry (his first time) and I spilled my ice cold Carona evil
(not my first time) and he & I were forced to take
cover in the house.  cheesy

My findings are that if you want frames (or anything else)
cleaned off by your bees, place the items out of site of your hives.
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Denise
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« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2006, 02:37:05 PM »

We've had trouble getting our bees even remotely interested in cleaning the honey off the damaged frames we've removed. No one from either hive really seems to care one way or the other. We thought maybe because there is so much nectar to be had they could really care less about it. You would think they would take whatever they could get though. Silly bees.
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"I saw me life pass before me eyes. It was really boring." - Babs, Chicken Run
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