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Author Topic: Build or Buy Honey Extractor?  (Read 2778 times)
Moots
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« on: January 21, 2013, 01:00:17 PM »

Ok,
I'm early on in beekeeping so probably have some time before this is an issue but have been thinking over options for extracting honey.  I hate to make a big investment so early on...Yet, I don't like the idea of purchaseing inferior quality or something that I'll quickly outgrow and regret.

Toying with the idea of building "something" ....Found these plans on ebay.  I've exchanged some emails and was advised that I should be able to acquire the necessary materials for around $65.00, that plus the $10.00 for the plans would be a $75.00 investment.
Ebay Honey extractor plans

Another options I've considered is trying to build something similar to  the Honey spinner, either by ordering the plans or winging it.
Honey Spinner

Any opinions or advice on either of these options, or some other option would be appreciated.
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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edward
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FEED ME HONEY or I`ll smash your screen !


« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2013, 01:11:34 PM »

Maybee you could borrow or extract using a neighbor's extractors.

mvh edward  tongue
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Moots
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2013, 01:24:18 PM »

Maybee you could borrow or extract using a neighbor's extractors.

mvh edward  tongue

edward,
That's certainly an option, and I may end up going that route.  But at some point, I'm either going to have to build or buy something.  I'm just trying to research and explore options....
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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bailey
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2013, 06:32:29 PM »

The pic of the one from eBay would be what I would choose
From the two.
I would add a guard for the belt / pulley system. Other than that
It looks like it could be a sound design. Depends on the internal workings.
Would keep looking for home made honey extractor plans.  You should find
A plan for a barrel extractor much like that one.  It would be
Free.  Sorry I can't tell you where to find it but I read it a year or more ago.

The main problem to overcome with the barrel extractors is the bottom load bearing
Contact point.  The site I read included where to find the plastic
Bushing that would work just as well as a commercial extractor.
Let us know how it works out!  
Bailey
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AllenF
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2013, 09:16:04 PM »

There has been lots of homemade extractors posted on this site over the years.   Lots of ideas in those posts.   You might could save $10.
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tefer2
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2013, 10:09:28 PM »

There are a couple sets of plans here   http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/

I would look to join a local bee club. Most have extractors to borrow or rent. Make some new friends and someone will help you out when the time comes. That way, you won't have a lot of money invested if you find you don't enjoy keeping bees.

On the other hand, save up enough money to at least buy an electric radial extractor. No sense spending money on something you have to crank by hand.
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Sundog
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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2013, 03:34:35 PM »

I made this one for about $100.  Not exactly "commercial strength", but enough for the few times a year I need one.  I was able to buy all the parts (ss shaft, bearings, plastic blocks) locally, so I saved by avoiding shipping costs.

It will spin four mediums radially, or four deeps tagentially by design although I have never used deeps for honey.  And, no, I don't use the cordless drill, I use a corded variable torque and speed drill when spinning frames.  After loading the frames, I put the lid on and set the tub in the sun until the temp inside gets up to about 95°F, then the honey runs well.  Afterwards, I put the pieces out in the yard and let the bees clean them up.  Served me well so far.


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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2013, 03:44:55 PM »

For 26 years I did without.  When I did buy an extractor it was a 9/18 radial motorized... I never regretted waiting until I need one that big and could afford one that big.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesharvest.htm
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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DC Bees
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2013, 10:32:54 PM »

You can build one for under 100.00 bucks.I made a nine frame extractor using a food grade olive barrel and a drill to spin out the honey out.You should be able to buy the basket from one of the suppliers that sell extractors.I made my own basket and it works great but I should of bought the basket and then built around it.You can also buy stainless steel bearings on ebay for 12.00 each.
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Moots
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« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2013, 12:01:31 AM »

Thanks for all the great responses and input from everyone...Lots to consider.

For the moment, I'm thinking I'll try something along the lines of what Sundog made.  A few questions about Sundogs design that hopefully he can chime in on, or anyone for that matter.

Since I'm all medium equipment, there is no reason for my design to even consider accommodating deeps.  I'm thinking four frame radial with the bottom piece being very similar to Sundog's design.  Thinking I'll go with a hole or slot close to the shaft to accept one of the top tabs of the frame with maybe dowel rod bumpers to support the bottom of the frame. 

For the upper plate I was thinking that a circular piece of wood with a much smaller diameter with 4 slots to hold the opposing top tabs of the 4 frames would be sufficient.  I'm thinking support from the top plate wouldn't have to extend to the bottoms of the frames since the bottom portion of the frame would be slotted in place on the lower plate....is this a bad assumption???

I notice Sundog uses a smooth shaft...wondering how he holds his top plate in place after loading the frames.  I'm considering using a threaded stainless steel shaft which would allow for some type of Wingnut or something similar to hold down the top plate after loading the frames.  Is there a reason to avoid a threaded shaft, or does this make sense?

I plan on using this in a food grade plastic barrel..Assume I would need to coat all wood and metal with a food grade epoxy or some equivalent...is this accurate.  If so, suggestions on what "exactly" to use would be appreciated.

Concerning DC Bees suggestion....I'm not against buying a ready made basket, just haven't had luck finding what I'm looking for.  I have seen some, but most small ones seem to be a tangential style, I really want to go radial...I'm thinking that's a better design.

Any thoughts and input is appreciated! 

Thanks... Smiley   
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
                                                                                                                   - Ronald Reagan
DC Bees
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« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2013, 09:04:56 AM »

Thanks for all the great responses and input from everyone...Lots to consider.

For the moment, I'm thinking I'll try something along the lines of what Sundog made.  A few questions about Sundogs design that hopefully he can chime in on, or anyone for that matter.

Since I'm all medium equipment, there is no reason for my design to even consider accommodating deeps.  I'm thinking four frame radial with the bottom piece being very similar to Sundog's design.  Thinking I'll go with a hole or slot close to the shaft to accept one of the top tabs of the frame with maybe dowel rod bumpers to support the bottom of the frame. 

For the upper plate I was thinking that a circular piece of wood with a much smaller diameter with 4 slots to hold the opposing top tabs of the 4 frames would be sufficient.  I'm thinking support from the top plate wouldn't have to extend to the bottoms of the frames since the bottom portion of the frame would be slotted in place on the lower plate....is this a bad assumption???

I notice Sundog uses a smooth shaft...wondering how he holds his top plate in place after loading the frames.  I'm considering using a threaded stainless steel shaft which would allow for some type of Wingnut or something similar to hold down the top plate after loading the frames.  Is there a reason to avoid a threaded shaft, or does this make sense?

I plan on using this in a food grade plastic barrel..Assume I would need to coat all wood and metal with a food grade epoxy or some equivalent...is this accurate.  If so, suggestions on what "exactly" to use would be appreciated.

Concerning DC Bees suggestion....I'm not against buying a ready made basket, just haven't had luck finding what I'm looking for.  I have seen some, but most small ones seem to be a tangential style, I really want to go radial...I'm thinking that's a better design.

Any thoughts and input is appreciated! 

Thanks... Smiley   

I agree with radial being the way to go also you can buy camcote from Brushy Mountain for $14.00, good luck.
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Sundog
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« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2013, 11:55:10 AM »

My two cents...

I am of the impression that the frames want to be spun with the top bar out.  I believe that I read somewhere that the cells empty more efficiently in that orientation.  So while my concept allows either orientation, I have only used it in the above manner.  The configuration for spinning deeps required only one additional hole.  Drilling a couple of extra holes in the arms was not much trouble and serves to lighten the load.  The holes are 1-1/4 diameter which fits Dandant frame tabs nice and tight.

I didn't coat the wood with anything.  There are many things that are "aged" in wooden barrels and I doubt that they are coated.  The arms are made of poplar which has a close grain as opposed to something like oak which is stronger, but has a very open coarse grain.  I think maple would be a good choice too.  How many butcher blocks and cutting boards are made from maple and used for food every day?  Besides that, the centrifugal force casts the honey to the sides and very little runs down the arms and does not sit there and soak because the honey pools beneath the arms.

The nubs glued along the edges are made from poplar scraps and are to keep the frames aligned in the arms.  If I ever remade them, I would use dowels or even nylon cheese head screws.  The arms are 1/2 inch thick and have a 1/2 inch block on the bottom with a kerf centered along the shaft center.  The shaft has a 1/8 inch roll or spring pin through it for each arm that keeps everything aligned to the shaft, the arms slide over it.  The top bar gets a hitch pin through another hole in the shaft over the top to keep everything held in place.  The most difficult thing is loading the frames because the darn thing spins so easily.  I need to figure out a brake.  cool

The shaft runs in sealed food grade bearings, but once again there is no contact by the honey anyway.  The bottom bearing is mounted in a three inch tall plastic block mounted with 1/4 inch bolts and sealed with aquarium glue (food safe).  I calculate it will hold between 3 and 4 gallons of honey, maybe more because the sides of the tub taper outward, before it needs to be drained.  I drilled a half inch hole at the bottom and use a cork in it.  Low tech and works just fine.

"Your results may vary"

Hope that "chimes" for you.  If you want you can PM me and I will send you PDFs with details, geometries and dimensions.

Have fun!
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brushwoodnursery
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« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2013, 08:29:01 PM »

Sundog, I would like to see the designs. 4 frame radial medium would suit me quite well. I can borrow equipment but part of the fun for me is building. I'll PM.
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korki
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« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2013, 12:15:48 AM »

Nice work
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