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Author Topic: Comb Rotation  (Read 1178 times)
RHBee
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« on: January 17, 2013, 10:15:36 PM »

I understand that we should rotate old comb out every 3 to 5 years. What I don't understand is what is the best method. Do we take old frames out and move the newer frames to the center then put new frames and foundation on the outer areas?
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Ray
edward
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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2013, 10:21:01 PM »

Start with the old ugly frames that are full of pollen or are full with drone cells them move on to the dark black frames.


mvh edward  tongue
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RHBee
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2013, 09:09:45 AM »

 Edward, I got that part. I just didn't know where to place the new frames with foundation. Do you place them on the outside of the brood chamber or simply swap places?
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Finski
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2013, 09:23:28 AM »

.
Rotation frames = important tool is 2 brood box system. Connected to swarming prevention you change the order od boxes and then bees consume the frame evenly.


In this picture frame has been in upper box.When it goes to lower box and bees move honey off and make there larvae.




Here is evenly consumed comb = goal
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Finski
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2013, 09:29:33 AM »

-
POLLEN

If you have much pollen in old comb, put it in the middle of brood frames. Bees fill the comb with larva and eate pollen off. Then lift the comb over the excluder.

If you want that pollen stores accumulate somewhere, put there brown combs. Bees do not like to store pollen into new combs.
Bees store pollen next to larvae.
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edward
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2013, 12:03:47 PM »

Edward, I got that part. I just didn't know where to place the new frames with foundation. Do you place them on the outside of the brood chamber or simply swap places?

I use double deeps and a queen excluder so my bottom box is filled with ten frames of brood and pollen above the excluder the food , honey and some pollen is stored.

A more traditional hive set up would bee frames with honey-pollen-brood++++brood,pollen and last honey.

If you use the same size frames throughout the hive I would move the ugly frames up into the supers and pull them out of production after the honey harvest.

When the hive is strong and healthy you can put on new boxes with frames ready for building over the brood nest, also you can divide the brood nest CAREFULLY with a few frames at a time. If you do this to early or in a weak hive they will not bee able to keep the larvae warm and chalk brood can happen.
They build very fast in the brood nest because it is warm and there is an abundance of young bees to sweat out the new wax.
I don't have any fixed places for my frames, it all depends on what the bees are doing with them at the time i check the hive.

If you are in doubt place them outside the brood nest and sooner or later they will get to them.

mvh edward  tongue
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T Beek
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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2013, 05:46:33 PM »

I generally remove old, dark frames on the first complete inspection in early Spring.  One time a year, its done. 

Its the perfect time of year because whatever you take away (leave any honey until the first flow), the bees can afford to loose it, because more is coming. 

Spring also should provide plenty of 'empty bottom box brood' comb (sometimes both bottom boxes are empty of bees after moving up all winter), which has been used a lot (usually the darkest is on the bottom) and can just be removed frame by frame or replaced w/ a complete fresh box. 

IMO Spring is the most opportunistic time to rotate old frames out.  CANDLE MAKIN' TIME grin

As far as placement inside the hive goes, I like to put the majority of used brood frames in the middle, w/ empties in between, since I don't use foundation this is what works for me and mine.
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bailey
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2013, 06:11:00 PM »

I pull dark frames and use them in swarm traps.   One old frame and 4 new empty frames.  
Bailey
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Finski
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2013, 04:25:35 AM »

.
I take dark frames off when it is handy. I do not generate rules.
There are several opportunities to do that.

One simple thing is to lifth them to supers. Bees fill them with honey, I extract them and them I look, can I use them any more.
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RHBee
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2013, 12:16:00 PM »

Thank you for your answers. I'm currently running 8 frame equipment and plan to go to all medium boxes. I will use my nuc boxes for swarm traps. You guys gave me some good information thanks again.
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Ray
T Beek
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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2013, 12:20:13 PM »

My set up is foundationless.  I've never extracted honey using an extractor.  The only tool I use to harvest is a sharp knife.  

I am a confirmed CombDrone, meaning I love fresh, clean, honeycomb filled w/ honey, preferably still warm from the hive.  Yum-yum.  

Now that's honey heaven  Smiley
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edward
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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2013, 01:12:30 PM »

I've never extracted honey using an extractor.

How do you sell the honey or extract it ?

mvh edward  tongue
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T Beek
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« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2013, 08:45:21 AM »

"Cut Comb" honey.  

There a several methods, squares or rounds, and container types, we just cut up chunks and put them in a pint mason jar.  

Less work, less equipment (a sharp knife and some jars) and a higher return overall for the Beek.  Of course, correctly done as a business venture, one would have to limit the number colonies, per Richard Taylor, to around 200.  A 'reasonable' living should be expected if one pursues a Cut Comb Honey Business these days IMO.

Some (a growing number) consumers prefer their honey in its purest (original) form.

(that's the honey I grew up on)
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