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Author Topic: Finely got to meet a local beek  (Read 469 times)
Willow
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Location: pymatuning lake


« on: August 15, 2014, 01:26:36 PM »

Just got done meeting a local beekeeper. He has agreed to take me around an show me his setup and come spring time will help me get started but he really dont want me to start with tbh. What are your thoughts. He knows 2 tbh beeks an says they cant get there hives through the winter. It gets mighty cold here in ne Ohio
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Trying to learn what all the buzz is about
johng
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Location: Jacksonville, Fl


« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2014, 03:24:34 PM »

I would agree. Start with a regular lang hive and then once your feet are wet you can try a TBH. I would also recommend starting with at least two hives. jmho
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GSF
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Location: Central AL (nw corner of Elmore County)


« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2014, 08:08:59 PM »

ditto on the two hives. Last June was my first year mark. Looking back I see where having only one hive could have been a disaster. Not having additional resources (i.e. eggs, brood, swarm cells, extra bees, ect) could have been the death of my one hive.

The TBH, I can't comment on because of zero experience. I do hear a common theme of having trouble getting them through winter. We had a speaker at one of our meetings who was dead set against them. He said they originated with primitive beekeeping in warm weather countries.

Don't take my advice as gospel. I think there's a TBH section on this website, they'd be the ones to talk to.

and if I haven't said it already - Welcome!
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

John Wayne
BlueBee
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Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2014, 02:12:02 AM »

Ohio is like the tropics.  With a little planning a TBH should be able to survive winter.  I don’t do TBHs but I have wintered over a number of 4 frame medium nucs in mid Michigan.  Insulation, wind breaks, and low mite counts are your friends when it comes to small colonies and cold winters.  Beeks tend to be a little conservative in their thinking; if you really want to do TBHs, I would just take the plunge and do it.  I believe TBeek was/is doing long hives in Northern Wisconsin with medium frames and it gets a whole lot colder on that side of the Lake.

It would also be wise to start with 2 or 3 colonies for the reasons the other guys noted. 
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Hops Brewster
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Location: Salt Lake County, Utah


« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2014, 04:47:44 PM »

I started with just one hive this spring, and still have just the one.  Fortunately, it's healthy and happy.  I can see where having another hive could have been beneficial to me, particularly in that I am unable to trap out a bee tree I know of until next spring.  I just can't spare the egg and brood frames!
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Winter is coming.
rookie2531
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« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2014, 07:56:42 PM »

I used to live up that way and I know it can get below zero and in the single digits for a few weeks. Definitely talk with others that do top bar, and in the cold. And as I'm learning here, local advise only goes so far when the guys are doing it the same way it was done 20 years ago. I had a local guy tell me that walk away splits would not create queen cells, that I would have to wait until spring to split a hive to get a queen. After I explained what I have read about splits, he still told me it would not work. I asked him how long he kept bees and he replied, "ten years". I'm not saying the guy you met don't know, I'm just saying, learn as much as you can from many resources.
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sawdstmakr
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Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2014, 10:00:37 PM »

Rookie,
 I agree, listen to what others say but decide for yourself what info you want to use. When I started in 2010, I was told you had to treat for mites. I even bought Apiguard to have it ready. Since then I have been told several times that they will not survive if you do not treat. I never treat and and I still have all the hives that I want to have in the back yard. If a hive cannot survive due to mites, I do not want it. I believe we are not helping the bees by treating.
Jim
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"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
LaurieBee
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I'm loving bees today. Interested in learning.


« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2014, 11:26:50 PM »

What Jim said.Wink
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Santa Caras
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Location: Lakeland, FL


« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2014, 12:25:59 PM »

As others have said...start in spring....start with 2 nucs......even with two, you will be hard pressed for backup resources and let them build from there.
I too am intrested in TBH but I've since started to look at Long Langs. Similar to a TBH but in the sizes and frames that a Langstroth hive will use. That way, everything you have will be compatable and you'll have Long Lang to play with and minipulate just like the TBH.
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2014, 05:09:16 AM »

As others have said...start in spring....start with 2 nucs......even with two, you will be hard pressed for backup resources and let them build from there.
I too am intrested in TBH but I've since started to look at Long Langs. Similar to a TBH but in the sizes and frames that a Langstroth hive will use. That way, everything you have will be compatable and you'll have Long Lang to play with and minipulate just like the TBH.

And if you want to switch to a Lanstroth or add supers over the long hive, everything matches and is interchangeable.
Jim
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"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
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