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Author Topic: Fresh Start  (Read 637 times)
mat299
New Bee
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Location: Northwest Georgia


« on: January 12, 2013, 08:33:51 AM »

Ok,  I lost four of my new hives that I started last year but I am not giving up.  I am going to purchase some more packages this spring and give it another try.  Here is my question.  Since I will be putting the new packages on frames that are already built out, I am wondering about feeding.  Should I feed them 2:1 like I would if I were putting them on new foundation or should the ratio be something else?  Also, how much do I feed?  I know there are a lot of different opinions out there on how much to feed a new package but I am interested in hearing what some of you say about feeding new packages on existing comb.  Right now, I am thinking of feeding each package one gallon of 5:3 ratio only.  The flow should be on by then and the will hopefully be able to forage for themselves.  Thoughts??
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AllenF
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Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2013, 08:41:16 AM »

New packages, spring feeding 1 to 1.   2 to 1 for fall storage.  Putting them on drawn foundation helps them out greatly.  8 pounds of honey goes into making one pound of wax.  You are saving a lot of honey for the bees.  I feed 1 to 1 in the early spring.   By the time the flow is on, they will not touch your syrup.
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10framer
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Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2013, 01:27:47 PM »

when will you be getting the packages?  we used to sell packaged bees around good friday if i remember right but we had winters back then.  if there is a flow on when you get them and they're on drawn comb i don't know that i'd feed them at all.
what do you think killed the hives?  if it was pesticide or several other things you may be dumping new bees onto old problems.
beekeeping was a lot simpler in the 70's and 80's.  c.c.d. was catholic sunday school, no beetles and mites were just something we knew were coming.  africanized bees were going to kill thousands of people and there was no stopping them.
definitely a different world now.
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mat299
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2013, 09:08:06 AM »

The packages are supposed to be ready by the third week in March as of right now.  I don't think it was pesticides that got them.  I believe that it was either starvation or SHB's that got them.  It was totally my fault I think.  It was a lesson learned for sure in my first year.  This year will be different I hope for I have gained a little more knowledge.
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10framer
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Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2013, 01:24:09 PM »

i'm back into it for the first time in several years.  were there bees left in the hives after they were dead?  should have been head first cells.
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mat299
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Location: Northwest Georgia


« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2013, 10:41:59 AM »

No, there were not many bees at all left in the hives.  Most were just gone if that is what you are asking.
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10framer
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« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2013, 10:27:56 PM »

were the ones left mostly in cells or on the bottom board?  hives that starve usually have dead bees with their heads in cells and their abdomens sticking out.  
what are your short term goals?  if you're not concerned about harvesting honey i'd probably just start out with two packages and plan on splitting them into four hives a later.  that's the great thing about bees you can double or triple your colonies in a good year if you aren't too greedy with the surplus.  
 
 
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