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Author Topic: Question about using robber/moving screen  (Read 1480 times)
Bee Curious
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« on: December 17, 2012, 10:50:11 PM »

I am a newbee busily assembling my first hive and equipment for next spring.  Over the last week or so, the city & the electric company have sent crews down my alley to trim any trees or bushes that might interfere with the power lines or the garbage trucks that go down the alley.  Both times, the trucks sat idling right outside the spot on my 6' high back fence where I intend to set my hive in front of.  The crews also worked on the 10' high weed trees/shrubs belonging to my next door neighbor.  These are within 15' of my hive to be.  I got to thinking--wouldn't these workers disturb the bees?  We have had temperatures as high as 50 degrees recently, and it's conceivable that bees might be out flying.  Might these guys with their little chain saws aggravate the bees and possibly get stung?

My question is, would this situation warrant keeping the bees inside the hive if possible using a moving screen? 
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RHBee
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« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 07:22:20 AM »

We have had temperatures as high as 50 degrees recently, and it's conceivable that bees might be out flying.  Might these guys with their little chain saws aggravate the bees and possibly get stung?

My question is, would this situation warrant keeping the bees inside the hive if possible using a moving screen? 

I routinely cut the grass within inches of my hives using all types of equipment. I wear dark colored clothes while doing so and I have never been stung. They bump into me or land on me to drink sweat (they like the salt) but never sting. I've heard tell about colonies aggressive enough to greet you  at the back door but have not experienced it myself. Unless my girls were like the latter, I wouldn't worry about the workers.
But, if you are concerned,  yes moving screens keep them in
To be effective, moving screens need to be installed at night prior to morning activity or else it traps bees outside of the hive.
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Ray
Joe D
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« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 09:23:04 AM »

Some days mine are as gentle as Rays, but somedays they aren't.  I mow close to my bees, some days in shorts other days in my bee suit, depending on their mood that day.  Also mow with mower exhast and discharge pointed away from hives.



Joe
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Bee Curious
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« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2012, 05:57:48 PM »


But, if you are concerned,  yes moving screens keep them in
To be effective, moving screens need to be installed at night prior to morning activity or else it traps bees outside of the hive.


Thanks for the answer, Ray. In both cases, the workers showed up before 7:30 in the morning, which is still not very light outside this time of year.  As it's December, I think only cleansing flights would be on the fly list for the day anyway. Am I right in thinking that? 
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RHBee
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2012, 12:16:17 PM »

As it's December, I think only cleansing flights would be on the fly list for the day anyway. Am I right in thinking that? 
I am by no stretch of the imagination an expert on honey bee winter activity. As I understand it bee activity in winter is temperature related more than anything else.  At above 57degF they break cluster and go foraging. During colder temps they only fly to go on cleansing flights. You could put that question out on the general forum and probably get a lot better answer.
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Ray
sawdstmakr
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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2012, 01:21:51 PM »

As it's December, I think only cleansing flights would be on the fly list for the day anyway. Am I right in thinking that? 
I am by no stretch of the imagination an expert on honey bee winter activity. As I understand it bee activity in winter is temperature related more than anything else.  At above 57degF they break cluster and go foraging. During colder temps they only fly to go on cleansing flights. You could put that question out on the general forum and probably get a lot better answer.

57 degrees???

I'm down here in FL and I have taken picture of my bees flying at 43 degrees F.
I also cut my grass right next to my bees with a riding mower. The trick is to go slow and as mentioned aim the exhaust away from the hive. Just don't do it in the rain.
I have also cut down trees in my apiary and had tree cutting crew remove a very large limb from above my apiary in town with no problems. If the fence is make from wood, I would not worry about it.
Jim
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"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
RHBee
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« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2012, 08:41:27 PM »

Thanks for chiming in Jim. This is my first winter also. I was only sharing what I have read.  I have seen my girls out at colder temps also. I just never saw them bringing anything back. I didn't say they didn't fly I said they began to cluster as the temps fall the cluster gets tighter. I could be wrong wouldn't be the first time, won't be the last. Thanks again.

I knew I had read it somewhere:

http://agdev.anr.udel.edu/maarec/honey-bee-biology/

One of the first sites I used for study. Lots of good info.


« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 11:28:23 PM by Ray Bayless » Logged

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Ray
sawdstmakr
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« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2012, 06:12:38 AM »

I see where you got the 57 degrees. Finding food depends on whether there are still flowers available. That depends on when you get the first hard cold snap. Where I am our temps have been close to freezing but the flowers were still available and they have been bringing in pollen and nectar. That may change today because it is 32 degrees right now. If the wind is blowing they might survive it we don't get the frost.
I hope we do not get a hard freeze because the bees in my observation hive are starting to build up. Down here they start after the winter solstice, the days are starting to get longer.
Jim
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"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
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