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Author Topic: Planting for bees...I hope!  (Read 3489 times)
qa33010
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« on: October 21, 2005, 05:09:03 AM »

Hi Everyone! Tongue

We have a small 1/4 lot in town that we live on.  Because it is so small and the yard is extremely hard to even out (do to drainage it roughs up) and is almost dangerous to mow.  I am crippled up and unable to mow, but I can get on my hands and knes for a little while to garden.  So to maximize the area and to help out the neighborhood bees my wife and I have decided to lanscape.  We also have hummingbirds and butterflies all over every year.  

     Due to zoning on fences we are looking to use a type of chaste tree relative kept trimmed to six feet as the fence line.  Inside we will have a couple plum or pear trees as well as a golden rain tree in the back.  Inside we also plan a small water garden (maybe)as well as butterfly bushes, bee balm, clover and herbs and mints, red and/or yellow trumpet creeper along the carport and monkey grass along the sand pathway and as 'where needed' ground cover.  We are also looking for opinions on our choices.  What do you think?  Thanks a bunch!

David
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2005, 08:06:41 AM »

In my opinion, the main goals in planting for bees should be early, late and drought flows.  In other words things that bloom in February or October or things that survive in the middle of summer when everything dries up.  Your bees have 8000 acres around you to forage. It's doubtful during normal times that they will even pay attenetion to what you plant.  But Pussywillows in the spring can make a big difference or Chickory during the hot summer and into late fall or goldenrod into late fall.  It doesn't hurt to plant some things that the bees will like if you're planting them anyway.  A Tulip Poplar is a nice shade tree that makes a lot of nectar.  White Dutch clover is nice in any lawn.  Sweet clover will make some nectar, but doesn't mow as nicely as the Dutch.
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Michael Bush
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zan
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« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2005, 03:25:41 AM »

And what do you think about tilia cordata?
I just buy one.
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qa33010
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« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2006, 11:33:37 PM »

Zan!!!

    All I can find so far (I just read your question) is that the Tilia Cordata, in Arkansas, blooms in May/June and is fragrant.  I guess the question would be by me is:  Does fragrance strength go hand in hand with nectar production?  If it does will the fragrance type (sweet, pungent, sour, ect...) determine the flavor of honey?  I know this may sound like a stupid question.  But I never said I had smarts or sense (or is that cents or even scents).  Plus I have no experience in this.

                                           Thanks,
                                  Waiting for our first real freeze this winter, David
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
amymcg
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2006, 06:40:39 AM »

I have a half acre lot and lots of garden.  I didn't see any honeybees in my yard until we had a dearth and then they hit my cucumbers really hard.  I have bumbles in my yard all the time.  You never know when your girls will start to forage in your yard.  Plant what you want, you might end up with your neighbors bees before your own. . .
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Anonymous
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« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2006, 12:46:56 AM »

All Bees love this plant and it blooms from july to frost in NJ. It`s called Agastashe (blue fortune), anise hyssop, or licorice mint. I planted 13 plants for my Bees, in hopes of having some nectar/pollen during the dog days of july and august.
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qa33010
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« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2006, 02:00:40 AM »

I was able to get some Medeteranian Heather earlier this year and planted them ten feet from the hive and they were pounced on bees!  They are early bloomers and grow to be about 3'x3' each.  Right now the russians are hitting the sunflower, thistle and white clover that is currently blooming (thanks MB).  I have our local nursery folks looking for more of the heather and more clover and Tulip Poplar and will hit them up with this later.  We seem to have started our drought early this year and I hope what we've started makes it.  Thanks for the input so far... hopefully it'll help other tiny land owners also.
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
KONASDAD
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« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2006, 12:25:48 PM »

Totally agree w/ Anise Hyssop. Bee drug. Bees sit on it and wont leave. you can actually touch'm. Bee balm also, but can be invasive like mint. Hyssop spreads nicely and is hardy too.
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Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2006, 12:20:16 AM »

All Bees love this plant and it blooms from july to frost in NJ. It`s called Agastashe (blue fortune), anise hyssop, or licorice mint. I planted 13 plants for my Bees, in hopes of having some nectar/pollen during the dog days of july and august.

Take cuttings from this plant (I refer to it as anise hyssop), I think Agastache up in my neck of the woods is deemed the annual version of anise hyssop.  I am not positive about this information though about if there is any difference, or are the same plant.   When the mother plants begin to grow in the spring, cut some of the new leaf tips.  I would cut below the third set of leaves on the stem, remove these third set of leaves and insert this stem into soil past where you removed the third set of leaves.  Keep them in a reasonably warm, indirectly lit windowsill and moist  These plants root within a couple of weeks from the tip cuttings and you can place them outside when the weather warms up.  If you have experience with stem cuttings, good for you, if you do not and want to try, try this method I have described.  I hope it did not sound too confusing, it is rather simple, just hard to describe.   Good luck, propogate your plants.!!!  Its a fabulous way of getting new plants with no cost, but your own hard labour.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2006, 02:49:58 PM »

My suggestions:
1. Plant for a sequence of blossoms from early spring to frost. (it will not only keep the bees interested, it makes a nice show through out the year.)  You should be able to do this with perennials, flowering shrubs & fruit trees.
2. Start with the perennials that are easy to divide and propogate, that way you'll get "free flowers" in coming years.
3. Favor plants with low maintence and low water requirements, that are suited for your climate. Native plants are best. Consult the local extension office for recommendations.

Our garden takes up about as much space as you'd have with a 1/4 acre lot, but the bees love it! Here's a link to our garden with some details: http://www.beesandblooms.org/  and the blog:  http://beesandblooms.blogspot.com/
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2006, 11:45:27 PM »

I'm planting three Hazel nut saplings this coming spring.  I love the nuts and the early pollen source is good for getting the bees up and running just as the Daffodils are sagging.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2006, 11:57:59 PM »

Oooh, hazel nuts, yummy.  Awesome for pollen.  We have several growing in our yard, some older a few younger, we never ever get any nut.  We have two species of squirrels here and between the two of them, the Stellar jays, and who knows what, I never gather a single nut.  I do see the shells.  I have gone out to a neighbouring town in an old mostly abandoned area of a park up on a great big grassy hill that has an enormous grove of hazelnut trees, wish it was closer to my home, cause we gathered nuts til we could carry no more.  Grow on the hazelnut saplings, they grow quite quickly!!  I think that the alder trees that grow in profusion around our place are incredible for pollen.  I do not know that for sure, but I think they would be.  On my patio deck outside my bedroom, when it rains, I take the opportunity to wash this deck with a sponge mop that I leave out there for that purpose.  In the spring the pollen that I wash off this deck is beyond your wildest dreams.  The sponge water is incredibly greeny looking.  I never thought about alder and pollen, but I see the catkins long before the different species of maples are producing pollen.  Great day...Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2006, 08:55:47 PM »

For those interested in foriegn languages the Chinook jargon word for hazel nut is Tukwila.  Chinook was used as the trade language between the various indian tribes from The Alaskan panhandle to as far south as Redding California, from the Pacific coast to the Rockies.  Kawhnice means Gray Whale. 
I write mystery stories for a little make believe town on the Washington Coast named Kawhnice Point--all the local town and land mark names use Chinook jargon words.  That, by Chinook and Salish Indian tradition makes me a Keelally.  A Keelally (means new [kee] and old [lally]) the name denotes the tribal historian.
One of these days I might get some of them published.  The stories heroine is Latino police detective and so I use three languages in the writing of the stories: English, Spanish, and Chinook jargon.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2006, 10:57:01 PM »

Brian, very impressive and interesting how you integrate three languages.  Tukwila.  I work quite deeply within our Aboriginal Children in Care.  I wish they could get into their roots and get excited about it.  Keep on writing and get some of that published.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Kirk-o
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« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2007, 10:50:43 AM »

I have times in LOS ANGELES when bees need some flowers
so I planted 150 African Blue Basil It is a HYBRID dosen't go to seed blooms year arond always covered with bees
kirk-0
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Cindi
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« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2007, 09:48:12 AM »

I have times in LOS ANGELES when bees need some flowers
so I planted 150 African Blue Basil It is a HYBRID dosen't go to seed blooms year arond always covered with bees
kirk-0

Kirk-o, oooh, African Blue Basil.  Another to add to my list, we have several species of basil and I agree, the bees love the basil.  I think that some of my bees are Italian, so no wonder they do (LOL).  Great day. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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