Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 23, 2014, 09:09:56 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How to stop killing bees.  (Read 2684 times)
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1085


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« on: November 17, 2012, 09:52:38 AM »

I have fought this problem all year. Every time I open up a hive to inspect, I kill bees during reassembly. I'm talking even putting the frames back in. When I replace the framec I insert them in the opening then slide them over. I use a small stick like a toung depresser to try to chase the bees from between the end bars but that doesn't always work. Bees get crushed when I replace the hive bodies. I move slow try yo give them time but always kill a few. Is there some techniques I could learn to prevent this? I have tried the bee brush, extra smoke and nothing seems to really work. The brush makes things worse. Lots of extra smoke can make them all hang out of the hive for a while. I did search for the answer before I posted.


Logged

Later,
Ray
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2012, 10:07:32 AM »

Slow down.  Always pays to move slowly and deliberately around your bees.

Do you wear gloves?  Try to give them up if possible.  When removing frames do you start at one side, removing an outside one and placing it aside until after inspection?  That will give you room to move things around, you could even remove both outside frames, which allows "plenty" of room.

Extra smoke will just tick them off.  Less is always better than more.  If you are calm your bees s/b calm also, unless there is some other factor.

I wouldn't try to move bees around w/ a stick, your bare (or gloved) fingers used gently will move them around just fine.  It takes some practice but well worth it for you and your bees.

That all said; we all kill bees from time to time, some a 'lot' more than others  Sad  Whenever anyone asks me "what's killing the bees" I can only respond w/; we are killing them.
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2012, 11:21:05 AM »

.
First thing is to get calm bees which act in pleasant way.

If you open the  hive couple  of hours before sunset, bees are often quite upset.
And may other things.

I use mostly smoke when I  push bees away from places where they use to crush between boxes and under cover.

But first of all, calm bee strain, which  means that every year you should take care of queen quality and eliminate queens which does not act well.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Maryland Beekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 275

Location: Columbia, Maryland, U.S.A.

Nature does nothing uselessly. Aristotle


« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2012, 11:43:54 AM »

'86 the gloves, make brush out of long grass, slide hive bodies together don't set, less smoke, I never smoke entrance just a few puffs upwind of the top, make sure smoke stays cool.
Cheers,
Drew
Logged
GLOCK
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 93


Location: north east PA.


« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2012, 06:25:20 PM »

Practice and time you can only get better seems like things in beekeeping get easy er as times go's on if ya make it past your second year.
You'll get it.
Logged

Say hello to the bad guy.
22hives  {T} OVA
little john
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 74

Location: Lincolnshire, England


« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2012, 07:22:02 PM »

I find that a really slow movement just as the frame is about to touch down, or move against the next one allows the bees to move out of the way - after all, they dont want to get trapped either !

A slow rotating movement when replacing the boxes, likewise allows them a second or two to get clear.

If the situation ever gets a bit frantic, and a bit like herding cats - then a quick squirt with a fine mist spray (plain water) always ensures that they get their heads down.

LJ

 
Logged
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1085


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2012, 08:44:13 PM »

Really great responses from all. Thanks. I will try to slow down some more. I really hate the crunching noise that says I just mashed a few of my charges. The grass for a brush is something I hadn't thought of as well as the placing the hive bodies at an angle then rotating them in. My bees are pretty calm. I have tried different amounts of smoke and have found that less is more. For a brush I once saw a video from the German IWF institute that showed a woman using a white duck or goose wing. Looked like the feathers didn't upset the bees near as much as my artificial one. I use the blue nitrile gloves with cotton liners to soak up sweat. I have gone without them and can do so again.
Again thanks I really appreciate the help.

Logged

Later,
Ray
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2012, 10:54:22 AM »

When harvesting honey I use a long turkey feather to remove bees from the frames before placing them in a honey super.  Never been stung once using a feather this way, but I'm not agreesive, just use gentle strokes.
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2012, 12:02:40 PM »

.
Bees die naturally every day 1000 -2000 . I do not sleep badly if I crush some bees.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2012, 02:58:06 PM »

"Finski the bee killer"  grin
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2012, 04:00:31 PM »

"Finski the bee killer"  grin

they started.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2012, 04:17:22 PM »

We've had very mild temps since I placed the foam shells around my 8 hives, our pond which was frozen over a few days ago is open again as of today,  November 18, almost unheard of in these parts. 

Today it was 54F so I "open fed" about 3 gallons of 3-1 syrup.  I just looked and its half gone already w/ all 8 colonies actively pursuing it. 

Finski; I Know, I Know, you don't think kindly toward Open Feeding, but if my bees are flying w/ temps in the fifties, I'm doing it anyway  Smiley
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2012, 04:48:42 PM »

.
I have very good feeders. When I fill them couple of times, feeding is done.

We have just now warm, even 6C. No bees are flying. They are in cluster.
They have been silent one month.  

open feeding; should I feed neighbour's hives too?
I cannot see any idea in that. I have 8 litre feeders.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
asprince
Super Bee
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 1693

Location: Fort Valley, Georgia


« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2012, 05:41:49 PM »

T Beek, how do you open feed? I need to do some myself.

Steve
 
Logged

Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #14 on: November 18, 2012, 08:17:32 PM »


I need to do some myself.


that is usefull idea
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4120

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2012, 08:27:58 PM »

I like T Beeks open feeding this time of year. applause  Most all of that feed is going to go to your own bees when the temps are in the 50F (10C) range.  I don’t believe bees are going to fly 3 miles in November to steal some open feed in our cool temps.  No yellow jackets this time of year.  I figure open feeding them during a warm spell (like today) is just a little extra insurance for winter.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2012, 01:19:48 AM »

.

Dry sugar on top bars, winter candy, open feeding in 10C temp in warm spell.   Extra honey super over and under.

Sounds perfect.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2012, 01:37:21 AM by Finski » Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4120

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2012, 01:36:53 AM »

Finski, we may turn you into an American bee keeper yet. Wink
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2012, 03:04:25 AM »

Finski, we may turn you into an American bee keeper yet. Wink

you really have lack of jokes. Jar feeding is funny enough but all those variants.
Bees really are in winter rest.

There is a difference between beekeeping and pet keeping.

Your mild climate and short winter forgive many douple insuarances. In my invironment they would be called douple mistakes.

God may bless America and its bees. No wonder  thay they try to disappear.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1085


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2012, 05:11:52 AM »

If the situation ever gets a bit frantic, and a bit like herding cats - then a quick squirt with a fine mist spray (plain water) always ensures that they get their heads down.

LJ
[/quote]
I had to laugh that is exactly what it feels like when they get all stirred up. I chase them away but they come back in even larger numbers. Frustrating to say the least. Gets even worse if one gets crushed as you replace a frame. Just plane water. Will add that to the list. Thanks Lj
Logged

Later,
Ray
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.439 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 19, 2014, 07:21:47 AM