Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 31, 2014, 10:25:14 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Leaving Honey Supers on.  (Read 634 times)
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 1086


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« on: November 20, 2012, 05:23:08 PM »

Does it cause any problems if honey supers are left on the hive over winter? I want to leave one on to make sure they have enough stores for winter. I am wintering my colonies in 2-8 Frame deeps and a medium honey super.
Logged

Later,
Ray
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2012, 06:09:26 PM »

.
It harms very much because bees must heat the vain room.

Heat rises up and bees are like without cavity shelter.

If you think youself in a smal room. You generate heat and the room is warm. But if you are in 100 persons room, your heat means nothing. It just escapes.

It means too that room is cool and the breathing water condensates inside the room.

So, keep wintering room tight, and if the food is near to finish, ad the super and bees have again a proper space where they have warm interior in top most box.

.yes, wintering hive is not right place to store extra boxes, are they full or empty.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4133

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2012, 06:27:28 PM »

Finski speaks the truth! 

I have observed what he is describing even in my foam nucs. 

I think leaving extra supers on in the north is a bad idea; however South Carolina is much different than Michigan.  You have a mild, or no, winter down there and that may change the equation a little.  If the bees are flying more, they’re going to be eating more and hence maybe the super would serve some positive effect.  It might also be warm enough down there in the winter for wax moths to reproduce and adding extra comb to a hive could be disastrous.  I would check with your local bee keepers and lacking any compelling reason otherwise, I would do as Finski says.
Logged
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 1086


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2012, 08:38:53 PM »

The supers are full. I will check with the local club. Thanks for the quick response. That is what I like about this forum. You guys don't mind giving of your time to help someone out.
Logged

Later,
Ray
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8113

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2012, 08:49:25 PM »

Full super?   You may loose your hive to beetles.  Bees will be in and around the cluster.   A little warm weather and the beetles move up and open up a buffet.    Pull the super and freeze them if you don't want or need the honey.   
Logged
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 1086


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2012, 10:28:00 PM »

Ok I'll pull and freeze the frames.  Can I use them in the spring to feed the colonies for build up? Also I am wintering in 2 eight frame deep bodies. Are the SHB going to be a threat in that configuration?
Logged

Later,
Ray
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.483 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 26, 2014, 02:52:54 AM
anything