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Author Topic: FGMO Fogging  (Read 3341 times)
2Sox
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« on: November 10, 2012, 04:19:05 PM »

I've heard of good results from using mineral oil in a propane fogger for the control of mites. The Fat Bee Man swears by it.  Since the oil coats everything in the hive, I'm curious how it affect the honey.  I have visions of a thin film of oil floating on top of any honey that is extracted.  What have been your experiences?  And opinions.
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Finski
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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2012, 04:48:28 PM »

.
What ever you have heard, but that is nonsense. Question is not about mite killing but about human food production
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2Sox
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« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2012, 04:50:54 PM »

Finski,
And....?
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"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
Finski
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« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2012, 04:57:17 PM »

.

Here is recommendations from Switzerland to treat varroa.
Methods are in middle left

http://www.agroscope.admin.ch/imkerei/00316/00329/index.html?lang=en

Those methods are result of 10 years researches what are best methods now.
That better has not been invented after publication od European Varroa Group reports..
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2Sox
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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2012, 08:46:24 AM »

Finski,

Thank you.  Very good reading.

Michael,

Regarding the wax combs softening due to the application of FGMO.  Do you have the references that point to the research on this? Thanks. 
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Maryland Beekeeper
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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2012, 05:14:33 PM »

 Did final inspection of season and fogged w/ FGMO last weekend. Brought one indoors to winter today, I have an oil tray peppered w/ Varroa. Thankx Fat B Man.
Cheers,
Drew
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2Sox
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« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2012, 09:22:13 PM »

Good to hear.  I haven't been able to do any fogging because of the temperatures.  Couldn't get to the bees on those warm days that just passed. Sad
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adgjoan
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« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2012, 06:05:31 AM »

I am interested in trying the fogging as well.  Did you see in another video The Fatbeeman mentioned putting 15 drops of wintergreen or spearmint EO in the fogger?  20 drops for heavy mite load.
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Finski
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« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2012, 07:43:00 AM »

I am interested in trying the fogging as well.  Did you see in another video The Fatbeeman mentioned putting 15 drops of wintergreen or spearmint EO in the fogger?  20 drops for heavy mite load.

140 chemicals have used in varroa killing. Are you going to try them all what guys tell?

Human food processing, you see.

I like like smoked fish, but I have never heard that some prepare smoked fish with exhaust gas.
Just put a garden host from car's exhaust pipe to the hive ...



"Tricks are many said mom when he swept table with cat"

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Maryland Beekeeper
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« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2012, 08:06:48 AM »

 I did see the wintergreen tip. Haven't been there yet. In my limited research there seems to be some disagreement as to its risk to humans. Some going so far as to say that a few drops is enough to kill you. I wear a respirator w/ plain FGMO so I certainly would wear one if I added the wintergreen. But as far as I'm concerned the effects of the FGMO fog on honey bee colonies are indisputable, B's are unharmed and mites are dead. I believe it will be a regular part of my management plan going forward, but if I was to hear from a few reputable sources that a hose attached to my exhaust pipe would help, I would be more than willing to try that as well  Wink

Cheers,
Drew
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2Sox
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« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2012, 12:11:51 PM »

Drew,
I believe The Fat Beeman used tea tree oil - not wintergreen.  Or at least I haven't heard about wintergreen being used.
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Maryland Beekeeper
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« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2012, 12:39:18 PM »

Tea tree for nosema, wintergreen for mites.
Cheers,
Drew
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2Sox
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« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2012, 12:41:25 PM »

Good to know.  Thanks!
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Maryland Beekeeper
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« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2012, 01:15:01 PM »

 Clarification : Tea tree in syrup for feeding not for fogging.
Drew
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iddee
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« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2012, 01:51:21 PM »

FGMO...... What does the FG stand for?

It is not going to hurt the honey. I fogged for years with FGMO and thymol. Never saw anything other than positive results.

Besides, when I was young, ""a couple hundred years ago"", my parents would give us a teaspoon of mineral oil for colds. Long before the food grade designation was used.
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little john
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« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2012, 01:54:22 PM »

Hi Drew - I was also interested in using FGMO as an anti-varroa measure, until I heard about Oxalic Acid vapour - or rather, sublimination.

Seeing as natural traces of Oxalic Acid are found in honey anyway, it's a method I'll be trying next. Sod dripping the stuff along the frames - I was never convinced that was an effective method of spreading it around.

Shouldn't be too difficult to make a suitable heater/blower - something along the lines of a current-limited vehicle cigarette lighter with a computer CPU fan to blow the vapour along a tube and into the hive. Maybe 5 minutes a hive ?

Important to stay upwind of course.

LJ

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Maryland Beekeeper
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« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2012, 02:33:44 PM »

-FG stands for food grade.

-Plenty of stuff on homemade OA vaporizers on here. Good results from accounts I have seen, and the Fat B Man uses it so it must work good Smiley

Cheers,
Drew
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Finski
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« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2012, 04:17:56 PM »

.
Varroa Control it's a serious problem in the Argentine and world wide Beekeeping. Recent experiences with Mineral Oil (FGMO) have generated a great expectation for their easy application, effectiveness, low cost and harmless.
This is a special edition of "Espacio Apícola" that contains all the investigation works developed by the Dr. Pedro Pablo Rodríguez using FGMO for the control of the Acarus Varroa jacobsoni Oudemans and the Acarus Acarapis woodi, supplemented with an important work of investigation of the Dr. Jorge Augusto Marcangeli on the hygienic behaviour of Apis mellifera L.

Update on April of 2001
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Finski
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« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2012, 04:26:46 PM »

.
Title: Evaluation of Food Grade Mineral Oil Treatment for Varroa Control
Authors


 Elzen, Patti 
 Cox, Robert 


Submitted to: American Bee Journal
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: May 25, 2004
Publication Date: November 1, 2004
Citation: Elzen, P.J., Cox, R.L. 2004. Evaluation of food grade mineral oil treatment for varroa control. American Bee Journal. 144(12):921-923.

Interpretive Summary: The Varroa mite (Varroa destructor) is the most serious pest attacking honey bees in the United States. Without control measures applied, an entire apiary can collapse in as little as two years. Currently there are four miticides approved by the United States EPA for national or specific state use against Varroa: Apistan® (fluvalinate), CheckMite+® (coumaphos), Sucrocide® (sucrose octanoate esters) and Api Life Var® (a blend of thymol, menthol, eucalyptus, and camphor).

Both Apistan and CheckMite have given excellent control in the past, but now Varroa has developed resistance to these compounds in many parts of the United States. Therefore, new Varroa control methods are very much in need at the present time. The goals in developing new compounds for Varroa control are that the product be effective, produce minimal effects on colony and queen viability, have little concerns for human safety (both in application and in residues), and be easy to apply and economical to treat.

Beekeeper testimonials from various countries indicate that food grade mineral oil (FGMO) provides effective control of Varroa. Food grade mineral oil applied with an insect fogger was evaluated for Varroa mite control in honey bee colonies by comparison to an industry standard, coumaphos strips, and an untreated control group (eight colonies per treatment group). During the six-week test period, the Varroa populations increased in untreated colonies and those treated with FGMO, while those treated with coumaphos strips decreased greatly.

 Coumaphos-treated colonies averaged 96.1 to 99.4% fewer Varroa than the untreated colonies. These data indicate that under South Texas spring conditions, FGMO fogging of hives is of no benefit in controlling Varroa mite populations or improving the overall health of the colony during a 6-week test period.

In contrast, coumaphos worked very well to control mite populations, allowed colonies to grow in population size and increase honey stores. Efficacy was measured in several ways, all indicating greater than 90% control of Varroa compared to the untreated colonies. These results agree with a previous report that FGMO is largely ineffective in Varroa control. In addition to providing no control for Varroa, FGMO applied in an insect fogger may pose a fire and/or health hazard to beekeepers and bees.

The health hazard of exposure to FGMO through inhalation and exposed skin is unknown. Possible contamination of honey and other beehive products with FGMO or any byproducts of heating the oil is also cause for concern. Some beekeepers and bee researchers have suggested using the FGMO as a carrier to apply other miticides to the colony. Exposure to a "hard chemical" such as an organophosphate insecticide in oil during this fogging application method through inhalation or the skin may pose significant human health threat to the beekeeper. This practice should be strongly discouraged.


Technical Abstract: Food grade mineral oil (FGMO) applied with an insect fogger was evaluated for varroa mite control in honey bee colonies by comparison to an industry standard, coumaphos strips, and an untreated control group (eight colonies per treatment group). During the six-week test period, the Varroa populations increased in untreated colonies and those treated with FGMO, while those treated with coumaphos strips decreased greatly and, consequently, averaged 96.1 to 99.4% fewer Varroa than the untreated colonies at the end of the test period, by the alcohol wash and sticky board methods, respectively. In addition to providing no control for Varroa, FGMO applied in an insect fogger may pose a fire and/or health hazard to beekeepers and bees.

 
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2Sox
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« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2012, 05:43:15 PM »

Finski,

Thank you so much for this.  I am very surprised that FGMO had absolutely no effect at all on varroa control.  Has there been any other research done besides that of Dr. Rodriquez?
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"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
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