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Author Topic: Ready for first winter, I have mold  (Read 1993 times)
robthir
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« on: November 01, 2012, 05:51:24 PM »

I was adding some fondant for my first winter with my bees and I noticed some frames of honey in the top super(I had planned to remove it anyway) that are covered with mold.  I don't understand what caused this or how to prevent it in the future.  Should I have removed it sooner?  I'm in Virginia and we just had about 10 inches of rain in the last couple of weeks.  I have a SBB so I feel like the ventilation is adequate.  I really have no idea.  Any ideas? Thanks in advance.
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Finski
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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2012, 06:38:21 PM »

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Mold appears when the hive gets condendsation water. It driplres from inner cover.

So I believe....

Perhaps you should restrict the bee room that the hive is wearmer it is warmer.

Then add insulation on inner cover that it is warm. Condensation happens on coldest surfaces.


Look lower boxes what is there? Is it occupyed by bees. If not, take extra room off.

If the edge most frames are full of pollen, they catch easly mold because they are near cold walls, Put along the wall white combs and pollen frames next.


What is the inner cover material in your hive?

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BlueBee
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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2012, 07:17:58 PM »

I’m not a mold expert, but I believe the convection currents present in a hive with LIVE bees keeps the mold growth to a minimum IF your hive volume is not excessive.  This is what I have observed so far.  I believe that if your hive volume is much greater than the space occupied by the bees, you are more apt to get mold.  As Finski says, I take off extra space the bees are not using.  I also use polystyrene hives which are warmer.  
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Maryland Beekeeper
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« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2012, 12:06:59 AM »

Rob,
Was the super full of B's ? Lang ? Under SBB ? entrance size ?  faces ? hive location ( shade, low area, air movement) ?
Cheers,
Drew
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robthir
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« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2012, 05:04:47 PM »

ok, this makes sense.  There is an extra super on that doesn't need to be there.  On the warm day, there were a few bees in that super, but I think I can remove it, they have enough room in the brood box and other super.   My entire hive is a Lang with a inner cover made of cork or some sort of softer wood.  I think if I remove the extra super, it will work out.  Thanks.  Do you think the mold will affect the honey?  It is actually the wax that's moldy, not the honey. The weather has been really crappy, rainy and cold, but generally, the hive has sun most of the day.  I'm going to try removing that extra super and see how it goes.  Any other feedback is appreciated.
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Finski
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« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2012, 05:14:54 PM »

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It is not wax problem. In moist hive bees get nosema.
Bees consume winter food too for vain.  ---this is one of wintering basics.

So, first you must restrict the colony to so small space as they stay inside.

The you take care of wintering food.

Then put on the inner cover 5-7 cm insulation. One inch cork is not enough.
If you have holes in inner cover, close them.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2012, 09:59:00 PM »

**It is actually the wax that's moldy, not the honey.**
                                                                                                                                                                                         sounds like all you have is BLOOM on your bees wax -no problem
 most mold is on the top bars not the wax- cool RDY-B

 Definition: As beeswax ages, often a white, powdery substance will appear on the surface. Don't fret, it's not mildew, it's called "bloom" and it's actually a completely natural occurrence and a sign that your beeswax is really pure. It doesn't affect the quality of the candle or the burning of the candle, and most people just leave it alone, feeling that the "bloom" gives the candles an antique or textured appearance. If you want to though, you can just wipe it off gently with a dry cloth, or remove it by heating the candle lightly with a hair dryer.
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Finski
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« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2012, 12:11:16 AM »

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Good heavens! What a diagnose. Mold in the hives are mostly blue or black.
When I open the hives, I cannot think that color of wax is mold.
Than worry has been mentioned only in foundations.

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rdy-b
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« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2012, 01:59:25 AM »

 I have seen bloom on frames of capped honey left in hives -cant imagine you havnt--you here the sound of hoofs
 and you think its horses --when in fact its zebras-- laugh-- Smiley RDY-B
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Finski
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« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2012, 02:48:56 AM »



I have seen more that more than you ever. In our cold climate wax get a shiny cover but I cannot imagine how it can be mixed to mold???

Zebra is easy. It lives in Africa, not in beehives.


.How can you mix mould and wax blooming............no use to read researches. It is better that you go yourself to be researched.
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saperica
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« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2012, 10:06:38 AM »

take 1 frame from each side of the hive and put the other frames in the middle. you will for a "air coushin".
bees will warm only the clouster and better disperzing heat.
water condensate will slip to the bottom an it is wise to rise end of the hive for 5mm that allows water to slip away from the hive.
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Maryland Beekeeper
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« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2012, 11:44:22 AM »

Were the supers checker boarded or aligned ?
Drew
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rdy-b
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« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2012, 12:30:05 PM »

**In our cold climate wax get a shiny cover but I cannot imagine how it can be mixed to mold???**

 and what would that be--its not shiny --its bloom--its a characteristic of bees wax--HELLOE

**How can you mix mould and wax blooming............**

 Thats the point it may not be mold it may be bloom-- HELLOE

** I have seen more that more than you ever.**

 FINMAN Imo going to buy you a PLASTIC BELLEY BUTON for Xmas
so you can look around --because your head is up your Butt-- laugh-- cool --RDY-B

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Finski
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« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2012, 02:06:13 PM »



 FINMAN Imo going to buy you a PLASTIC BELLEY BUTON for Xmas
so you can look around --because your head is up your Butt-- laugh-- cool --RDY-B



Look Imo, I have nursed bees 50 years. I have nothoing to learn in this issue.
 Go to eye doctor if you cannot do difference with normal wax and moldy wax.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2012, 10:51:19 PM »



 FINMAN Imo going to buy you a PLASTIC BELLEY BUTON for Xmas
so you can look around --because your head is up your Butt-- laugh-- cool --RDY-B




Look Imo, I have nursed bees 50 years. I have nothoing to learn in this issue.
 Go to eye doctor if you cannot do difference with normal wax and moldy wax.


 But whats realy going on-- rolleyes

Finland Facts - 60 Minutes
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Finski
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« Reply #15 on: November 04, 2012, 02:43:58 AM »

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That above is very true






Look this

http://nexuscanada.blogspot.fi/2010/12/top-10-countries-has-best-education_30.html
« Last Edit: November 04, 2012, 02:53:59 AM by Finski » Logged

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BlueBee
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« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2012, 03:20:11 AM »

Sounds like we should send Dr Phil and Oprah to Finland to "help" the Fins  Smiley
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buzzbee
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« Reply #17 on: November 04, 2012, 05:01:11 AM »

Here is a case a photo would tell the story. Mold is a symptom of a problem inside the hive which likely could be corrected if done in time.,bloom is okay.But bloom is also something that occurs as beeswax is aged.
If mold appears in other areas,perhaps you fed syrup too late and have a quantity of uncapped nectar in the hive. This will be a problem if that is the case.
Too much moisture can lead to wet bees and dysentary. Eventually the colony will collapse in cold weather.
There is a needto identify which case you have.

As stated above,removing unoccupied space will be a big help.


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Finski
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« Reply #18 on: November 04, 2012, 06:36:35 AM »

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Mold appezars in the hive where exist enough mopisture. There are allways some material for mold food.

A warm hive keeps the hive dry. It is relative moisture which keep the hive dry. Bees generate heat all the time and hive is allways warmer that outdoors.

Once I had a 30 mm polystyrene board as a cover. I wondered what is this rain above the top bars.
I measured the wall of polyhive and it was 40 mm. Board was full of droplets. It was coldest surface in the hive and respiration moisture condensated onto board.
Same has happened when I have used wooden 22 mm board pieces in nucs. It works in summer but in autumn the boards are so cold that they start to condensate respiration moisture.


Compare car windows in chilly weather when you sit in the car and ventilation is not running.
Blow to the glass.
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Finski
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« Reply #19 on: November 04, 2012, 06:38:47 AM »

Sounds like we should send Dr Phil and Oprah to Finland to "help" the Fins  Smiley

Yes, you have there problems like mold and you solve the problem so that you send your best psychiatrits to Finland.

Amazing idea!!!

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