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Author Topic: Dyce Method for Creamed Honey  (Read 1244 times)
OzBuzz
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« on: October 30, 2012, 11:19:44 PM »

Hi Folks,

Was just wondering if anybody has used the Dyce method to make creamed honey? I followed it to a 'T' - I have the benefit of working in a laboratory so I have temperature controlled incubators etc - the method suggests that it should take a week at 55oF (12.8oC) for crystallisation - has anybody experience with this method? do you find that it stagnates for a few days and then all of a sudden gets to a point where it just turns quickly? I've currently got 150 jars in a refrigerated incubator at 12.8oC - they've been in there for 6 days and there is some crystallisation but not a dramatic crystallisation... any thoughts would be appreciated
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Finski
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« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2012, 12:12:50 AM »

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It depends what is the year's honey. The result is unpredictable. . If canola does not give yield, honey crystallizes very differnet way than normal.
I have tried some years now creamed receipt but it gives every year surprise compared to my early 30 years.

My early method was that I let the honey crystallize to the end in 400 kg tank. Then I heat it up in 35C cabin that it becomes soft and then I put it into jars. It is crystallized partly but it flows out.

Again in jars honey crystallizes again and it is soft like a butter.

But this method is slow.  Now I do not put it into 400 kg tank. I started to use 30 kg buckets. When honey crystallizes in bucket to the end, then I warm it up it and put into jars.  It is easy to store in 30 kg buckets and when needed, then to be jared.

It is easy to soften 30 kg buckets that you can jar it.

By the way. I have done creamed honey 45 years but the method has varied.

It is not laboratory job.

- make a seed honey
- mix it into bigger amount
- let it crystallize in under 17C temp
- mix it during crytrsallization

If you mix crystalled and extracted honey 1:1, it will be hard. But it depends on the plant where they got it.

Fireweed honey does not crystallize and it keeps mixtures soft.
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OzBuzz
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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2012, 11:32:25 PM »

Thanks Finski,

I understand it's definitely not a laboratory process - it's just I had the equipment there to be able to better control the process so i used it... thankfully it's started to cream and it's amazingly smooth! can't wait for it to be completely finished!

I went with the 10% rule so to every 20kgs of honey I added 2kg of seed - it may have happened a little quicker if i used more seed but everything that i read suggested that greater than 10% served no real purpose and was just a waste
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Finski
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« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2012, 01:58:31 AM »

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Start is the main thing that you get smooth seed dose.

As important is the controll of temperature of big amount, that crystallization happens quickly.

Difficulty is in summer temperature. Crystallization happens best in 15C and where you get that?

My friend uses a chest freezener. He put time cutting into electrict that the chest keeps the 15C temp.

The more quickly crystallization happens, the bigger is the number of crystalls (=many)

If crystallization is slow, seeds have time to grow bigger.

That chest is good to use as honey store. If temp is 25C, honey starts to melt back and it gets a fermented aroma after 3 months. It is living a chemical mixture, you know.

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Finski
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« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2012, 02:10:52 AM »

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Lesson one in that creamy honey recipe was that blend such honey dosages that the aroma of mixture is good.

Many honey sorts are very mild and do not differ much from sugar. Canola is such a stuff. Fireweed is mild and pure clover honey.  To mixture canola gives a fat basic aroma, and I like it. It makes the honey easy to crystallize.

Fireweed (Epilobium) does not crystallize at all. It gives a fruity after taste.

My mixture blending starts so that I carry my hives on various pastures. It would be easy to put them all in canola but it is not good for marketing honey.
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