Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 02, 2014, 01:14:10 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Beekeeping Gloves  (Read 2380 times)
rawfind
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 212

Location: Ne ,Victoria


WWW
« on: October 29, 2012, 08:27:36 PM »

Hi All,
         I am finding that the leather gloves i use have a cloth part just past the wrist , the bees regularly sting me in this area , the other type i tried had vents in that area, the bees stung me there too, anyone else having this problem? and can anyone suggest a better glove or a way to avoid the stings? re Neil

gloves
Logged
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2012, 08:30:55 PM »

Tuck the gloves into your long sleeves.

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
asprince
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1694

Location: Fort Valley, Georgia


« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2012, 08:37:53 PM »

I use soft leather gloves that I get Tractor Supply or Ace Hardware that I tuck under my sleeves.


Steve 
Logged

Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
ShaneJ
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 519


Location: Burpengary, Queensland, Australia.


« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2012, 09:38:24 PM »

If you stop using gloves you will find yourself being more gentle with the bees and they wont sting you. If I'm unlucky I may get 1 or 2 stings on my finger tips throughout inspecting my 20 hives.
Logged

Shane
Mek
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 43

Location: Tamborine Mountain "Cue"LD Australia infront of the computer


« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2012, 10:20:36 PM »

Wash hands with a light dilution of white vinegar  (haven't tested) was told by another bee keeper.
Wash hands with water and avoid having honey on your hands? - Watched a beek with a water in a keg on his truck.

Logged
Maryland Beekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 275

Location: Columbia, Maryland, U.S.A.

Nature does nothing uselessly. Aristotle


« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2012, 01:03:54 AM »

I second Shane. Gotta loose the gloves, eventually, if they are stinging you are doing something wrong,( hot smoke ? rough ? dark cloths ? perfume ? bad timing ? gloves/suit smell like dog/cat/deodorant ? ) gotta figure out what that is and correct it. When U can go through with no stings you will no longer need the gloves, or the veil for that matter. And pretty soon you'll only need just the lightest few puffs of smoke here and there, maybe none at all.
Enjoy the journey,
Drew
Logged
sawdstmakr
Super Bee
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 2928


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2012, 11:53:28 AM »

I'm with Shane. My first year with full suit on, after I was done and took the suit off bees would come out and sting me. First the gloves came off and then the bees calmed down. It didn't take long to remove the whole suit. Remember to move slow over the hive. If you want to stop the bees from stinging a certain area, use Vick's vapor run on that area. Bees don't like it. Just don't leave to much on your hands after applying it. You end up putting it in the hive. Some times when I know a removal might be rough, I will put it on my ears and forehead and face. It takes a bit of getting used to around the eyes but it will stop most except the ones that come straight out of the hive at you at full force.
Jim
Logged
Maryland Beekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 275

Location: Columbia, Maryland, U.S.A.

Nature does nothing uselessly. Aristotle


« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2012, 01:14:57 PM »

couple of things occurred to me
-the statement you are doing something wrong doesn't sound like I intended, something is going wrong is better
-maybe the most important and obvious thing I missed is the sound, pay close attention to the sound.
-stop if they sting, smoke a little step away and let them calm, you can't go thru with them stinging you.
-Can't kill any. The odor released can set them off. No reason to squash any if you plan your moves in advance and proceed slow and steady, they will accommodate your action.
-Keep a  calm assertive state of mind. Increased heart rate, anxiety, fear, will have you releasing scents that could result in defensive reactions.
Cheers,
Drew
Logged
JPBEEGETTER
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 188

Location: ARCHDALE NC


« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2012, 01:37:34 PM »

With bees that are, as jp says ,"a little pissy"  I use a misquito pull over and blue nitrle gloves have little to no stings..JPP.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13626


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2012, 02:02:03 PM »

I also buy regular soft leather gloves and tuck them in my sleeves.  Cheaper and easier to get on and off.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Maryland Beekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 275

Location: Columbia, Maryland, U.S.A.

Nature does nothing uselessly. Aristotle


« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2012, 02:18:34 PM »

Perhaps golf gloves would work nicely ? And the prop. would help u grip the clubs better  !  Smiley Might have found a new market for the Beekeepers ! Propolis for Pro golfers, baseball players, quarterbacks & receivers, might work good for rock climbing now that I think about it, gotta try that.
Drew
Logged
gailmo
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 54

Location: Columbia, Missouri


« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2012, 04:52:36 PM »

This is a photo of my former "bee gloves".


And this is my hand after wearing them!



The hive I was working I call my "freaking hot" hive!  I managed to pull tons of honey from it this year, but as soon as spring comes, they are going to be requeened. I would have done it earlier, but I didn't have a queen available and didn't get a chance to order one.  And if they don't make it this winter, I won't be totally upset.

I now wear lined rubber gloves I buy on Amazon.  They are called ""True Blues Small Ultimate Household Gloves".  I like them because I have small hands and the small size fits perfectly.  They last about a season and the bees can't sting through them. 
Logged
Maryland Beekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 275

Location: Columbia, Maryland, U.S.A.

Nature does nothing uselessly. Aristotle


« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2012, 05:23:00 PM »

Ouch ! Got ya good there. Been stung a couple times doing cutouts this year. I take a vitamin C and a Benadril right away. And no coffee for @ least an hour.
Cheers,
Drew
Logged
bernsad
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 462

Location: NE. Melbourne, Australia


« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2012, 06:38:49 PM »

The Benadryl I understand. How do the vitamin C and the lack of coffee help?
Logged
Maryland Beekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 275

Location: Columbia, Maryland, U.S.A.

Nature does nothing uselessly. Aristotle


« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2012, 07:25:36 PM »

Vitamin C helps the system break down the toxin, for me anyway the coffee and the toxin lead to some strange and a bit scary reactions. Light headedness, irregular heart rhythm (had this reaction twice this year, the second time not as pronounced, after multiple stings). The other interesting thing I've noticed is that a sting here or there, ( the B's like something on my mossy brick patio, I go barefoot most of the time ) is no bother but I feel it as a sort of itching in the nearest joint and even a little in the joint above that. ( ankle/knee;elbow/shoulder)
Logged
bernsad
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 462

Location: NE. Melbourne, Australia


« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2012, 08:32:54 PM »

Vitamin C helps the system break down the toxin, for me anyway the coffee and the toxin lead to some strange and a bit scary reactions. Light headedness, irregular heart rhythm (had this reaction twice this year, the second time not as pronounced, after multiple stings). The other interesting thing I've noticed is that a sting here or there, ( the B's like something on my mossy brick patio, I go barefoot most of the time ) is no bother but I feel it as a sort of itching in the nearest joint and even a little in the joint above that. ( ankle/knee;elbow/shoulder)
That's interesting, thanks.
Logged
rawfind
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 212

Location: Ne ,Victoria


WWW
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2012, 03:04:05 AM »

This is a photo of my former "bee gloves".


And this is my hand after wearing them!



The hive I was working I call my "freaking hot" hive!  I managed to pull tons of honey from it this year, but as soon as spring comes, they are going to be requeened. I would have done it earlier, but I didn't have a queen available and didn't get a chance to order one.  And if they don't make it this winter, I won't be totally upset.

I now wear lined rubber gloves I buy on Amazon.  They are called ""True Blues Small Ultimate Household Gloves".  I like them because I have small hands and the small size fits perfectly.  They last about a season and the bees can't sting through them. 


that hand looks nasty!!   i found the rubber gloves are real good when doing a cut out dosnt matter if they get honey all over them, hands tend to sweat heaps though
Logged
rawfind
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 212

Location: Ne ,Victoria


WWW
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2012, 06:34:21 AM »

I second Shane. Gotta loose the gloves, eventually, if they are stinging you are doing something wrong,( hot smoke ? rough ? dark cloths ? perfume ? bad timing ? gloves/suit smell like dog/cat/deodorant ? ) gotta figure out what that is and correct it. When U can go through with no stings you will no longer need the gloves, or the veil for that matter. And pretty soon you'll only need just the lightest few puffs of smoke here and there, maybe none at all.
Enjoy the journey,
Drew


Well it is windy often where i live and i cant always get the perfect day so sometimes i have to do it when time allows, mostly they are ok it seems the larger hives get cranky by the time i get to the 3rd super, that's usually when they hit me, have caught a couple of aggressive swarms this year, don't know if they were dry swarms or just plain nasty, but i will re-queen them when i get things under control again.
At the moment im building frames and boxes like crazy just trying to catch up i have hives that are building up fast and need xtra supers on them.
Logged
ShaneJ
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 519


Location: Burpengary, Queensland, Australia.


« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2012, 07:04:28 AM »

How bad are the SHB where you are? Around here the days of just adding an extra super are gone. Anymore than 2 honey boxes are you're at high risk of loosing the hive to SHB. I only keep one honey super on my hives. When its full I extract it.
Logged

Shane
rawfind
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 212

Location: Ne ,Victoria


WWW
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2012, 01:50:21 PM »

How bad are the SHB where you are? Around here the days of just adding an extra super are gone. Anymore than 2 honey boxes are you're at high risk of loosing the hive to SHB. I only keep one honey super on my hives. When its full I extract it.

i guess ive been lucky here, no beetle only pest was a few wax moths on the small colonies , how do they spread? moving hives around?
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.479 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page August 09, 2014, 04:46:01 AM