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Author Topic: My first hive, problems overcome, new report and pics feb 12  (Read 11335 times)
Finsky
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« Reply #40 on: February 12, 2006, 07:40:54 AM »

Like Jack says, you should make a reasonable inner cover. The idea is that the gap between frames and ceiling is 10 mm. Not less or more.

I think that you have too much room in hive untill new bees start to emerge. There are quite few bees on your combs and the egdes of comb is not fully built.  You save wax for foundations if you stop the burr raising: no extra gaps.

It seems that you use inner cover upside down. Higher frame side is meant up and "no frame" side towards hive.
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mick
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« Reply #41 on: February 13, 2006, 01:50:09 AM »

Thanks for the input Guys.

This cover has got me stumped. Like I said, theres no way..........hang on! I think there is a sheet of plywood directly under the tin. If I remove it and place the four pieces of timber in first, then nail the board to the four pieces of timber, then there will be a box created. Got it? then if that sits on the hive the "gap" under the lid will vanish.

Is that the answer?

edit: I inspected the new 8 frames and found two of them covered with bees drawing the foundation, the rest had a dozen bees on each side doing the same thing. This was while most were away foraging.

I left some comb for them on a groundsheet yesterday and notice that some are feeding on the wax and honey.
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Finsky
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« Reply #42 on: February 13, 2006, 02:08:17 AM »

Quote from: mick
Is that the answer?


Towards the hive you have mere 10 mm wooden planed board or plywood. They are good because you may clean them with flame.

Then around the inner cover you have a frame which make the system rigid. If you need insulation on the cover during winter period you make about 5 cm high frame where you put insulation material.

Inner cover should be also firm. When you lift it and bees have attached it fast with combs, it must be able to twist it off. Material should be fast that bees do not eat it and it does not attach to hive box with resin.
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Yarra_Valley
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« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2006, 02:17:54 AM »

Some people put a piece of lino or something similar across the top of the frames to act as a kind of inner cover. You could try that, but I it could screw with the ventilation gained with the cover the way it is. If the bees run out of room they will build on top of it anyway.

See what works for you. Oh yeah, all covers I've seen in Victoria are the same as ours.
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Careful, my pets can smell your hives. Cool
mick
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« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2006, 02:48:54 AM »

Ok cool, I was thinking that maybe thats how the guy showed me in the shop, with that board on last. I reckon if I do that and fill it with insulwool it would be a good idea.

I watched some vids from germany I think and they were covering the frames with a plastic sheet then the lid. I dont think this would be a good idea for Aussie conditions tho, too hot.

My conditions are more like the Med. than anywhere else in europe they say. Nothing in the Uk comes close, as for the US, probably the southern states come close.
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mick
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« Reply #45 on: February 13, 2006, 03:02:53 AM »

Nope thats all wrong. It has to stay the way it is or I lose the ventilation holes. I guess our lids are special adaptation for local conditions. Aimed on maximum ventilation I spose.
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Finsky
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« Reply #46 on: February 13, 2006, 03:30:30 AM »

Quote from: mick
My conditions are more like the Med. than anywhere else in europe they say. Nothing in the Uk comes close, as for the US, probably the southern states come close.


You should go to some professional beekeeper or so and offer youself to help him in his job without salary.  He would tell some basics from local honey harvesting.  You have in Australia high level beekeeping and you have your own nature there.  To know bee plants is the other half of beekeeping.

Try to find some tutor to you. It helps more than else.
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Yarra_Valley
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« Reply #47 on: February 13, 2006, 04:44:20 AM »

Quote from: Finsky

You should go to some professional beekeeper or so and offer youself to help him in his job without salary.  He would tell some basics from local honey harvesting.  You have in Australia high level beekeeping and you have your own nature there.  To know bee plants is the other half of beekeeping.

Try to find some tutor to you. It helps more than else.


With Finsky on that. Do you go to the VAA (Victorian Apiarists Association) meetings? Think that's what they're called. I went a few times before I left Australia. They meet in Kew once a month. There annual auction should be coming up soon, an excellent oppurtunity to expand your hiveware. They usually do a buy and sell at every meeting anyhow. Commerical beekeepers quite often do talks on how they do things. They also have a collection of whats flowering on a table at that time of year so you can learn to identify it. They have a library of relevant books.

James.
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mick
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« Reply #48 on: February 14, 2006, 01:58:57 AM »

Thanks guys, I missed a big bee field day by about a week when I got started on this, keeping an eye out for the next one.

Over the years I have known a few beekeeprs, old man Archibald for one, but I know none atm.

In the meantime I will keep tapping into the thousands of years of knowledge on here.

I took some comb into work today for everyone to taste. Everyone was amazed at the taste and "ahh thats real honey" was the usual comment.

I checked the new super, they are really going to town on the new frames. Theres another couple of months before it gets cold here (18c av) so I reckon I might be adding another one soon.

At this stage Im planning to pinch a couple of the frames they draw out if I can for use in the future on my second hive when it eventuates.
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