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Author Topic: What do you use to filter your honey?  (Read 2509 times)
Apis629
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« on: October 13, 2005, 04:59:10 PM »

My first honeyharves is in about a week with my last two medium supers filled and about a month untill it starts to get below 60 degrees.  (It still hasn't even dropped below 70)  There has been a major honeyflow of palmetto over the last two weeks and I need to extract since the bees are almost completely out of room.  I've ordered all the parts I've found nessesary (i.e. extractor, uncapping knife, bottling bucket, fume board and bee quick®).  I saw the price on some of the filters and thought that surely I could find something MUCH cheaper...I'm a cheap-skate. cheesy

I've heard about people using paint strainers, panti-hose, socks, and cheese cloth.  I was wondering which of these workes best in your opinion. I'm also conserned about safety, like, would any residual chemicals contaminate the honey, altering the flavor(beyond the flavor alteration that occurs with the removal of pollen and wax).  Thank you.
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Dale
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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2005, 07:17:39 PM »

I'm a luttle cheap too!  I do have a double sieve, and that filters about 70 % of the wax.  I learned from an oldtimer, to purchase a womans slip, and use it.  Its better to have nylon, polyester because you won't get lint in your honey. That will filter the rest.  If you can't afford the double sieve, get some 8 mesh screen for the major stuff, and some window screen (the fabric kind) and filter out the mediun stuff. then use the slip.

I hold the slip by using a five gallon bucket, that I cut 6 inches off the top. Stick you slip over your bucket, and then stick to top portion of the cut bucket inside. This will hold the fabric very nicely, and away you go.
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Dale Richards
Dal-Col Apiaries
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Jay
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2005, 09:34:45 PM »

I only like stainless steel to touch my honey (untill it goes into my food grade plastic buckets for storage) and I don't show my honey I only eat and sell so I like all the benifits of the pollen to be in there. Therefore, I only use the double sieve. Anything more fine than that and you are taking out too many things that I want to eat anyway!! Just get out the wax and legs and I'm happy! Cheesy

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super dave
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2006, 04:09:44 PM »

http://www.baileypottery.com/studioaccessories/studioaccessories.htm
http://www.baileypottery.com/studioaccessories/prodequipment.htm



here are two links two Sieves used by pottery poeple like my self-- you can get some very fine mesh sizes that are  just as good as  chezze cloth or pantys -- i'm just starting out in the big world of beee keeping so i havn't tried them yet but i will when my first hearvest comes around-- does any one have any thoughts on these
later
dave the potter
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Finsky
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« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2006, 04:16:50 PM »

Those are really too small.

I use "net curtain"  textile.  When surface is 1 m2  it works quite fast. You just tighten it on the top of your container. It is easy to wash when it is nearby blocked. It need premium grude sieve witch catch biggest wax away.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2006, 10:46:30 PM »

I went to a local paint store and bought a micro mesh plastic seive. Easy to clean and works great Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
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