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Author Topic: LOST HIVE  (Read 1919 times)
Barnabus
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« on: October 12, 2005, 09:40:20 PM »

Hi:
I lost a hive to wax moths today. The Queen just wasn't laying enough eggs to keep the hive strong. When they get started it doesn't take them long to ravage a hive.
I did see something that I don't understand! On three of the frames there were capped brood but the cap had a small hole in it.  There were also cells that had bees in them that looked as if they were fully developed but were dead.
Anybody have any idea what this might have been or what caused the holes and the bees to die.
I have four other hive at this same location, should I be concered obout them? I inspected them today and they all were very strong with plenty of good brood and lots of bees.
Any information is appreciated.
Thanks
Barney
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bassman1977
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2005, 09:55:27 PM »

Check out page 4 of this PDF.  It has pics of cell damage caused by varroa.  

http://www.csl.gov.uk/science/organ/environ/bee/factsheets/managing_varroa.pdf

I need to get treating myself.  I've seen bees being pulled out with deformed wings.  Hope it's not too late.
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Finsky
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2005, 11:18:46 PM »

Quote from: Barnabus

I did see something that I don't understand! On three of the frames there were capped brood but the cap had a small hole in it.  There were also cells that had bees in them that looked as if they were fully developed but were dead.


How much you hive has room? If it is too much, it not able to keep brood area warm or it is not able to protect it.

3 frames brood is a good colony. Of course it must protect it against it's enemies. Noboby else can do that.

At autumn when winter is coming bees let brood die and carry them out. Could it be that?  It is usual that one day they carry all out even if brood is almost bees.

If varroa contamination is big enought bees carry out wingless emerged bees.  Varroa does not cause winless, but it is a virus.

Small hole may mean that bees have started to take away brood. They first open the cap.

But  dead brood in 3 frames is quite much.

Difficult to say from long distance...

In American foulbrood there is tiny holes through  caps. Then you may have 3 frames dead with small holes. If you look inside, do you have coffee brown tar inside cell.

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2005, 09:09:10 AM »

I'd be looking for the cause.  The wax moths are not the cause.  They are the symptom.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
bassman1977
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« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2005, 12:32:07 PM »

Quote
At autumn when winter is coming bees let brood die and carry them out. Could it be that?

I'd bet this is what I'm seeing.  I haven't had much of an issue with mites all year.  I did see that bees were hauling off drones about a week prior to this.
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Finsky
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« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2005, 04:00:34 PM »

Quote from: bassman1977
Check out page 4 of this PDF.  It has pics of cell damage caused by varroa.  

.


I have not seen cell damages by varroa. What do you mean?

There are white mite larva skins inside cells but not other signs. There are  ofcourse adult mites and white little mite larvas.

Mites are seen when bee or drone emerge from his cell.
.
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Apis629
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« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2005, 04:44:01 PM »

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There are ofcourse adult mites and white little mite larvas.



Sorry Finsky but, this isn't entirely correct.  The young mites are not in the form of larvae with regards to the fact that larvae would mean that there is metamorphasis later in life.  The young mites are actually nymphs given they do not go through a pupa stage but, hatch from eggs with the same shape as their parents and the only change is their size and color not form.  I know...I'm too technical. wink
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2005, 07:25:25 PM »

Actually the number of the legs chagnes also from six to eight.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Finsky
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« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2005, 10:21:33 PM »

Quote from: Apis629
Sorry Finsky but,




Never mind. I am master in science in biology and I know that but I just tried to use something popular.  If baby mite is proper Tongue

Baby mite change it's skin during his life course, I suppose.
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