Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 30, 2014, 07:26:15 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Bee Equipment and Flea Bombs  (Read 719 times)
bullybrink
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 27


Location: Berkeley Springs, WV


« on: October 15, 2012, 04:40:24 PM »

I have a medium full of capped honey that was put inside a trash bag and tied loosely shut. It was in a room where a flea bomb was set off about a year ago and the honey was in this bag then and has been sitting there for the last year. My questions are
(1) Do you think it would be safe to eat the honey?
(2) Do you think the medium and frames inside are safe to use come spring if need be?
(3) Should I just throw out the honey and foundation and then burn out the box and torch the frames a little and reuse?
Logged
sawdstmakr
Super Bee
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 2894


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2012, 05:28:20 PM »

It depends on how well it was sealed. I would look at how well the top was closed up. Then I would take it off the super and do a leak test. Fill it with air, seal the end and see if it hold air and does not have any holes. If there is any question of being leak proof put the whole thing in trash. Keep it sealed or your bees will find it. This past year I removed bees from a tool box that had about 60 pounds of honey but the bottom of the box had a broken bag of seven dust. Put the box and the honey in a trash can, sealed it up and took it to the dump.
Jim
Logged
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2012, 07:07:01 PM »

Air it out well and put it on the bees come spring. In older times it was common for beeks to stack their supers and comb, cover with plastic and set off a "bug bomb" underneath to keep the wax moths away (I even know of one that still does).

I don't agree with this method at all!!!

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8119

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2012, 07:21:56 PM »

I would second the idea that it depends on just how well the bag was sealed up.  If it was sealed up well, the I would not worry about it.   Have you opened the bag to see what the comb looks like lately?   Are you wanting to eat the honey or just feed the bees with it?
Logged
bullybrink
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 27


Location: Berkeley Springs, WV


« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2012, 08:55:50 PM »

Well the bag was not sealed up well at all. I was hoping to maybe be able to eat the honey myself but am not sure it is worth the risk. I don't want to kill my bees either by feeding it to them. I'm not sure what is the right answer. Do you think it would be ok to just lightly torch the box and the frames and throw out the honey and foundation?
Logged
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5995

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2012, 09:20:20 PM »

I would eat the honey. The bug bomb was effective for about 4 hours. If there was a danger after that, what in your kitchen could you eat the day after the bomb was used? Pesticide is not everlasting. You eat it everyday from veggies that were sprayed in the garden.
Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Jim 134
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2227


Location: Hinsdale, New Hampshire 03451 USA


WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2012, 09:37:07 PM »

Air it out well and put it on the bees come spring. In older times it was common for beeks to stack their supers and comb, cover with plastic and set off a "bug bomb" underneath to keep the wax moths away (I even know of one that still does).

I don't agree with this method at all!!!

Scott
DITTO


       BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
Logged

"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.211 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page August 12, 2014, 11:30:21 AM