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Author Topic: Thank you  (Read 609 times)

Offline JackM

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Thank you
« on: October 10, 2012, 09:48:41 AM »
Well I guess I made it through the year, ready for winter which is supposed to start on Friday.   In particular I need to express thanks to Kathy and Alicia, who have been patient and tolerated my insecure emails and assisted me through this first year.

I never intended on taking honey this year, but had to, just so the hives didn't get too tall.  I harvested 5 gallons between the two hives.  Been fun, educational, and at times hard work.

We started with 2 packages, one of which had a bad queen and I killed her off and combined her staff with a local nuc, which has been stupendous.  That hive alone was 3 gallons.  Learned how not to make the bees mad when I inspect, learned I am indeed allergic to an extent of bees, but not dangerously so...yet.  So I have to suit up and wear gloves every time so I don't get stings.  I still get lax and do some stuff without suiting up like filling the top hive feeders.

Anyhow, thanks to all of ya, even if you weren't my mentor, I probably learned something to do or not to do from most of you.  Have a great winter.  Lets see what I have left come spring.
Jack of all trades
Master of none.

Offline Rodger J.

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Re: Thank you
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2012, 10:34:11 AM »
Good job. My first year and I got 5 gals also. Yea us! Now lets get them through the winter.  ;)

Online kathyp

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Re: Thank you
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2012, 12:49:21 PM »
your emails have been fine!  i thought your questions were pretty well thought out, and most of the time you found your own solutions.  glad things have gone well and lets hope for a short winter and long spring!
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

 

anything