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Author Topic: How much honey for winter (new jersey)  (Read 814 times)
Chrisd4421
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« on: October 01, 2012, 06:32:05 PM »

Hi all,
Searches are not providing what I need so I am starting this post.  I also posted on a different forum as well

I know that the bees need about 60lbs of honey stored for winter in New Jersey.  i run all mediums.  Each hive has 3 brood boxes (still solid packed brood pattern which is surprising me).  I also have 1 honey super (medium) which is still being filled and capped.  

There is not enough on the 3 brood chambers yet but I could backfill from the full frames in the honey super to get there.  

My question.Is there a problem with just leaving the Honey super on for the winter and letting them manage it themselves? The hives are still packed with bees and the nights are down on the low 60s now

>Chris in nj
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derekm
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« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2012, 07:10:05 PM »

it all depends on ypur beekeeping practices ... if you had an insulated hive with a bottom entrance it could be as low as 20lbs  ( as shown by studies in Norway)
An uninsulated top entrance hive is going to need 3 times as much...
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If they increased energy bill for your home by a factor of 4.5 would you consider that cruel? If so why are you doing that to your bees?
rick42_98
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2012, 02:41:04 PM »

Chris,
I would not leave the honey super on thru the winter.  Too much space for them to manage.  place the inner cover on top of the brood boxes, then the honey super on top of that.  Hopefully they'll bring the honey down.  If they don't then pull the honey super and replace with a feeder.  Just my 2 cents.  Are u in North Jersey?
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Chrisd4421
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2012, 07:31:40 PM »

Rick
    Thanks!!  I will give it a shot.  I am in Plainfield.... More central

Will let you know how it does

Chris
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« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2012, 05:06:06 PM »

I had many winters where a full deep box just made it. Wind breaks are very important here with Arctic winds and prevailing winds dropping down here often make for ridiculous wind-chills.

Spring can be a killer too. That early warn Indian Summer and returning cool Spring with low stores of honey can bit you. Keeping a few frames to throw in during late March can be the difference if a long cool Spring returns.
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