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Author Topic: T-111 Wood Siding for hive bodies?  (Read 3479 times)
sixacrebees
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« on: October 01, 2012, 08:59:25 AM »

Curious is anyone has used this for hive body construction.  I have some large pieces left over and thought about using it.  My main concern is that 3/4 - 1/2 thickness that happens where the grooves are cut every 6" could cause some issue with winter heat retention.  Any opinions are appreciated.

Thanks
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BlueBee
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« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2012, 10:27:50 PM »

Isnít the stuff only about ĹĒ thick to begin with?  Yes youíll loose more heat though the grooves, but isnít that akin to saying youíll get colder outside during winter in a tank top than in a tee shirt?  If you donít start with much insulation to begin with, Iím not sure itís worth worrying about those grooves. 

The insulation value in something really comes down to how many little pockets of air there in the material.  Natural wood has a lot of little pockets and tunnels for air to get trapped and act as an insulator.  However wood is typically only good for about R1 per 1Ē of wood! 

Compressed wood like T111 is going to have much worse insulation value than even real wood I would think (Donít know the numbers on T111) since there is going to be far less places for little bubbles of insulating air. 

The best insulation (sans a true vacuum and areogel) is foam which consists of millions of little bubbles of air (or other gases) which retard the flow of heat/cold from one side to the other.  If you donít want to lose a bunch of heat through the grooves of T111, wrap the whole thing with foam.  Polystyrene or Polyurethane.   
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sixacrebees
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2012, 02:34:06 PM »

thanks, after consideration looks like it not worth the risk of loosing bees.
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danno
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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2012, 03:31:10 PM »

you can make swarm traps out of it.  I use 1/4 luan for most of my traps
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paindragon1
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« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2012, 06:06:03 PM »

Wouldn't the bees end up closing all the gaps eventually any ways?
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AllenF
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« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2012, 09:49:44 PM »

You would want the smooth side to the inside, grooves to the outside.   Bees will not close up the gaps in the outside of the hive. 

I would second the idea for swarm traps.   I just don't think that T-111 would hold up for hive bodies.   
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sixacrebees
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« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2012, 07:43:23 AM »

last night I tried some of it on some Coates nucs, seems to work.  This is the 15/32 stuff, so a little thicker than 1/2".
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Rex "Hawk" Smith
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2012, 12:59:50 AM »

For my swarm traps - I used leftover smartside siding for the lids.  Everything else is standard plywood.  Not really happy with them, though - as the ply absorbs water and de-laminates eventually.  My next ones will most likely be solid wood - as I have  LOT of rough cut 1x lumber. 

Makes me want to buy a small lumber mill like a Wood Mizer (or similar) to make use of all the trees that died on our land from last years' drought.
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AllenF
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2012, 08:41:12 PM »

You have to cut a lot of trees to "pay" for that sawmill.  When you cut up all your trees bing that saw my way.  grin 
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Rex "Hawk" Smith
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« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2012, 02:09:51 AM »

I don't disagree Allen!  I've had a hankerin' for a sawmill for a while, though... and have been looking at several brands.  The economy is such that I can probably get a small one (all manual - no hydraulics) for a song.  Problem is - I can't sing!  Maybe someone would give me a mill - to keep me from singing! lol   chop chop chop chop lau lau
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BlueBee
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« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2012, 09:15:59 AM »

I keep thinking a saw mill would be an excellent investment given the price of hardwoods.  I still havenít figured out exactly why people (lumbermen) claim itís not economical to mill your own Walnut, Oak, or Cherry trees given the prices I see at the lumber yards. 
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D Semple
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« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2012, 09:40:25 AM »

I keep thinking a saw mill would be an excellent investment given the price of hardwoods.  I still havenít figured out exactly why people (lumbermen) claim itís not economical to mill your own Walnut, Oak, or Cherry trees given the prices I see at the lumber yards. 


I mill my own for furniture, but it doesn't pay for cheaper woods like we use for bee boxes.

Way to many steps involved to make it practical and cost effective.



But don't buy the mill, haul you logs to a mill and they will cut them up for you for 15 - 25 cents per board foot.

Don
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paindragon1
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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2012, 10:48:30 AM »

Oh come on.... A walnut bee hive would be awesome.
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D Semple
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« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2012, 01:56:10 PM »

Oh come on.... A walnut bee hive would be awesome.


Tried it, too heavy

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paindragon1
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« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2012, 02:24:33 PM »

It looks freaking awesome though.
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AllenF
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« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2012, 04:03:55 PM »

I agree.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2012, 01:04:18 AM »

D Semple, that thing should be a in museumÖor Fort Knox!  What a hive!
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