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Author Topic: temperature conversion  (Read 5494 times)
Dick Allen
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« on: October 08, 2005, 12:04:00 AM »

A lot of us who were taught to read thermometers in Fahrenheit don’t have a good feel for Celsius temperatures (myself included) as some people admitted during the recent discussion about overwintering and insulating hives . Here’s something I read from a beekeeping newsletter awhile back.

The equation for converting from Celsius to Fahrenheit is:

ºF = (9/5)  X  ºC + 32  

Looking at the equation we can see that, roughly speaking, 9/5 (or 1.8 ) almost doubles the Celsius temperature and then 32 is added to its product.

That gives us a method then to do quick and dirty calculations in our head for “normal” temperatures we are likely to encounter.

To do a ROUGH conversion in your head from “normal” temperatures of Celsius to Fahrenheit, double the Celsius temperature and then add 30 to it.  

For example when the temperature drops to about 14º C, bees start to cluster and generate heat. So what is that in ºF?  Doubling 14 gives 28 and then adding 30 gives 58º F. The actual temperature in Fahrenheit is 57º.

Once again this only gives a rough conversion for normal temperatures likely to be encountered, and at very high or very low temperatures the results become more and more skewed. However, it does offer a quick method to get a feel for what that Celsius/Fahrenheit temperature you are reading is.

To determine an approximate Celsius from Fahrenheit temperature in your head, simply subtract 30 from the Fahrenheit value and then divide by 2.
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Finsky
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2005, 12:45:57 AM »

Thanks Dick.  I have all the time international troubles when reading your farenheits and inches and ounces .

one kilo  = about 2 ounces.

But most troubles to understand to each other is when we live in different parts of climate from Florida to Canada.
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qa33010
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2005, 02:31:27 AM »

When it comes to kilos vs lbs I just remember 1 kilo is about 2.2 lbs and 50 kph is roughly 32 mph.  I just adjust automatically...     David
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2005, 07:39:21 AM »

Quote from: Dick Allen

The equation for converting from Celsius to Fahrenheit is:

ºF = (9/5)  X  ºC + 32  

Looking at the equation we can see that, roughly speaking, 9/5 (or 1.8 ) almost doubles the Celsius temperature and then 32 is added to its product.



So why not just say;  1.8 X C + 32 = F   Why do we have to bother with the 9/5 ?
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BEECANUCK
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« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2005, 09:43:47 AM »

Why not petition your government to switch with the rest of the Industrial world :roll: :D
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2005, 10:07:38 AM »

IMO we US Americans were taught that the metric system was difficult and confusing.  In classrooms for decades they made us convert back and forth in math class and everyone got the impression that it would be that way if we went to the metric system.  Congress even madated it once, but no one paid attention.  I've had many conversations trying to explain to people that conversion has nothing to do with using the metric system.  If your ruler measuers in metric then you just measure it.  If your thermometer measures in Celsius, you just read it. The only thing that takes a little (very little if you use it everyday) getting used to is a feeling for how long 10 cm is or how far 100 m is or how much 50 kg weighs.  But using it everyday you'd get that very quickly.  As a carpenter and a printer and now as someone who is constantly calculating things for beehives, I'm constantly converting inches to decimal feet or fractions of an inch to decimal inches in order to do simple math on measurments.  The thing we US Americans were NOT taught in school is that the metric system eliminates all of those conversions so you spend LESS time converting.

But I think it's too late now, unless they simply raise a generation of people measuring with metric in school and NEVER converting and then they might get it.
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Michael Bush
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limyw
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« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2005, 11:47:05 AM »

I do agree that converting is a waste of time, just use whataver unit is provided. After certain time you would get use to them. I learnt imperial system during primary school, and our government changed it to metric during my secondary. So I learnt both. I dont encounter much problem to use inch or mm now, although at the beginning it was so confusing and troublesome.

Both I deeply felt we should standardize all measuring unit, although it is almost impossible. Resources were wasted everyday because of different system. A bolt and nut store has to store at least 3 times more of stock in order to meet different specifications: inch, metric, NC, NF, BSP.....Crazy!!!! angry
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lyw
eivindm
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2005, 01:07:50 PM »

I have mentioned this before in an other thread, but again, google is the tool for conversion.  Just "search" for the conversion like this (example):
20c in f
or
20 fahrenheit in celsius
or
20m in inches

Even currency conversion is supported:
200USD in NOK
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Dick Allen
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« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2005, 01:18:31 PM »

>I have mentioned this before in an other thread, but again, google is the tool for conversion.

Well, yes of course it can be done on the internet using google or any of the other search engines, but what if you are, say, reading a magazine article or attending a beekeeping talk, etc. and you are away from your computer? What then?
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eivindm
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« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2005, 02:09:47 PM »

Quote from: Dick Allen

Well, yes of course it can be done on the internet using google or any of the other search engines, but what if you are, say, reading a magazine article or attending a beekeeping talk, etc. and you are away from your computer? What then?

Away from my computer? Don't happen very often  wink Both at work and at home I have the Internet within an arm's reach. Hmm..  "My name is Eivind, and I'm a computoholic". cheesy
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2005, 07:55:28 PM »

Quote from: BEECANUCK
Why not petition your government to switch with the rest of the Industrial world rolleyes Cheesy


I think the rest of the world should change to our way of doing things.  Smiley
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Joseph Clemens
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« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2005, 08:16:03 PM »

Quote from: Jerrymac
I think the rest of the world should change to our way of doing things.  Smiley


------------------------------- cheesy
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Finsky
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2005, 01:30:40 AM »

Quote from: Finsky

one kilo  = about 2 ounces.

.

 Latebee wrote me friendly and told me that one kilo is roughly 2.2 pounds or approximately 35 ounces.

What a shame to me. I have believed that ounce and pound is 2 different name to same measure.

*** Greetings from the border of civilization!
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2005, 07:30:08 AM »

16 ounces = 1 pint

16 ounces = 1 lb (pound)

2 pints = 1 quart

4 quarts = 1 gallon

2,000 pounds = 1 ton

55 gallons = one barrel
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2005, 07:58:23 AM »

Yes and 12 TROY oz make a TROY pound but 16 avoirdupois oz in anavoirdupois pound.  7000 avoirdupois grains in a avoirdupois pound.

For area, how about hides and virgates.

Or my favorite measurement of velocity:  Furlongs per fortnight.  Smiley

http://www.onlineconversion.com/
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Michael Bush
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2005, 09:31:57 AM »

I never even heard of some of those.

I don't know how long a rod is, nor do I understand a knott, and is a naughtical mile different from a regular mile?
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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thegolfpsycho
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« Reply #16 on: October 10, 2005, 11:54:41 AM »

a nautical mile is based on distance and degrees at the equator.  divide a degree by 60, and you get a nautical mile. About 5500 feet.  A knot is for measuring speed.  If traveling 1 knot per hour, you would cover a little over 6,000 feet, or about 1.1 mph.  A rod is for fishing, and I think I will go!
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2005, 12:25:02 PM »

Quote from: thegolfpsycho
 A rod is for fishing, and I think I will go!


Go where??? Fishing?
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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thegolfpsycho
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« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2005, 02:32:46 PM »

Yes fishing.  The browns are hitting pretty hard up on the Duchesne River.  Gonna go beat the water to a froth with some home made spinners tomorrow
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Finsky
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« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2005, 03:07:09 PM »

We have a measure in speaking  "a stone throw".  It can be traced back to the  Viking Age

" How long way is it there to walk? - A  stone throw walking and the rest left running"

In Lappland we have measure "a reindeers pee". This distance is 7.5–10 km.


More strange measures:

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/encyclopedia/l/li/list_of_strange_units_of_measurement.htm
.
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