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Author Topic: Formic Acid  (Read 2661 times)
Peppy
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Location: White County, Arkansas


« on: October 06, 2005, 08:58:32 PM »

A fellow beekeeper in a local Arkansas association is selling Formic Acid as an aid in controlling Varroa and Tracheal mites. The procedure calls for using the product as a vapour with a dispencing pad placed over the frames. Has anyone had experience using this type of treatment and are there any toxic side effects in its use? Any advice/information appreciated.
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Bobby
Apis629
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2005, 09:17:51 PM »

While I have no first hand experience, everything I've read says that the fumes do not contaminate the wax but, with the formic acid treatement there is a high risk of queen death (20-30%?)
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2005, 11:03:21 PM »

I have not used it.  The two big down sides to me are that it is very temperature dependant and the high queen mortalitly makes me think it must be pretty bad for the bees.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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stilllearning
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Location: Clarendon,Texas


« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2005, 06:43:03 AM »

formaldehyde, a medical preservative and disenfectant, when it is exposed to air, one of the resulting chemicals formed is formic acid.
Formaldehyde is know to cause cancer in some instances
it is also used in embalming fluid. I wonder if formic acid has some of the
bad properties of it.  Formic acid is also found in the sting of ants and some plants, I understand it to be the thing that causes the pain in
stings from ants and plants.  I would not want to expose my bees to it.
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Wayne Cole
Apis629
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2005, 05:55:51 PM »

With plants stinging nettle releases HUGE amounts of formic acid.  Sometimes it appears to hang off the stems like dew.  I remember one day I was out hiking, saw this plant that looked like it had alot of dew on it and my hands were sticky with pine sap so I RUBBED MY HANDS ON IT.  It felt like I had just stuck my hand into a fire ant nest.   cheesy   ANyways, back on topic, if you're trying to controll varroa all I use is a SBB and powdered sugar.
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Peppy
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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2005, 09:22:49 PM »

Many thanks to all of you that responded to my questions about formic acid. I was hesitant to use the product in the first place and now most certainly will not. Though I have not yet done a mite count I will, and if any are present will do a powdered sugar dust to treat. Best regards to all of you, Bobby.
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Bobby
ApisM
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2005, 11:04:56 PM »

Hello All,

Here in Northern Ontario, Canada we use formic to control our mites, very successfully.  I do the treatment in the Fall when the temps in the evening does not allow the evaporation of the acid, but allow it to evaporate in the day.  This on again/off again system persists for 21 day eminating from the pad.  This acid will not contaminate the honey and this acid is found in nature so it is the better than man-made chemicals.

It also treats for both Varroa and Trachyral mites simultaneously!

Cheers
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Finsky
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2005, 03:13:32 PM »

http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests-diseases/animals/varroa/guidelines/formic-acid-guideline.htm


Formic acid vaporazing is usual method in Finland against varroa.

It widely used in many countries.

(formic acid has nothing to do with formaldehyde)
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stilllearning
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« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2005, 07:05:11 PM »

Quote from: Finsky
http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests-diseases/animals/varroa/guidelines/formic-acid-guideline.htm


Formic acid vaporazing is usual method in Finland against varroa.

It widely used in many countries.

(formic acid has nothing to do with formaldehyde)


Here is a something you might want to read Finsky
I know you have been lucky useing it for years but it may have side
effects

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/encyclopedia/f/fo/formaldehyde.htm

Formaldehyde is readily  (Click link for more info and facts about oxidized) oxidized by atmospheric oxygen to form FORMIC ACID Formaldehyde solutions must be kept tightly sealed to prevent this from happening in storage.
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Wayne Cole
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