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Author Topic: Entrance reducers and mouse guards  (Read 2182 times)
Parksguyy
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« on: August 30, 2012, 09:30:18 AM »

New Beek here guys/gals,
I'm located near Ottawa, Ontario ... tend to have pretty cold/long winters.
With fall coming on, its time to start thinking about winter preparation. I will be re-installing my entrance reducer at some point, just not sure which opening to use ... I'm thinking about the larger one (3" or 4") because I've heard that dead bees may block the small opening during the winter. Also, should I be using a mouse guard in conjunction with my entrance reducer, especially if I continue to use the larger opening that would definitely let mice in?  I'm not sure if the mice could get in thru the smaller opening to be honest.  I do have a top entrance/ventilation hole as well.
Comments please and thanks.
Kerry   
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Joe D
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2012, 11:16:24 AM »

Kerry was hoping someone closer would respond to your questions.  Unless it is gowing to get really cold here I can run with SBB, haven't used a entrance reducer, and for mice I have only seen 1 around my hives.  He was dead on the landing board.  All this is of no help but maybe it will get people started.  Good luck



Joe
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kaz052
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« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2012, 02:57:50 PM »

Last year was our first year as beeks and like yourself we were concerned about how to over winter our hives. We did a lot of research and found mixed feelings with using SBB's, wrapping with tar paper, etc. What we ended up doing was leaving the SBB's on all winter, reduced the entrance to the 3/4" opening (make sure the open is at the bottom so the bees can push out the dead), and did not wrap the hive.

To block any wind, we put up a snow fence with an old tarp over it. In our research, found that it wasn't so much the snow and cold that hurts the hive, but rather the cold air blowing up into the hive.
Our hives are also about 2' off the ground.

During last years winter we would check on them regularly and was suprised at the heat you feel coming out from around the telescoping cover. At the bottom of the hive there was never any snow. Just a square shaped patch of grass.

We had a mild winter last year and had 100% survival. We are going to the same things and hopefully have the same luck as before.

Walt
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danno
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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2012, 03:17:31 PM »

use a mouse guard of some type.  if a mouse can fit his head in a hole, he's in.  if he cant he will chew it big enough so he can
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yelnifok
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« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2012, 11:39:56 PM »

I use snbb year round and the bees come out of winter in great shape. They have a 3/8" high x 3/4" wide entrance on either side of the landing board and I have yet to find a dead mouse or signs of one in any hives. My colonies are on metal frames @ 6" off the ground.

This is 2011 winter with @ 18" of snow.
lee
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danno
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« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2012, 03:50:28 PM »

I use snbb year round and the bees come out of winter in great shape. They have a 3/8" high x 3/4" wide entrance on either side of the landing board and I have yet to find a dead mouse or signs of one in any hives. My colonies are on metal frames @ 6" off the ground.

This is 2011 winter with @ 18" of snow.
lee

I think your location might of had something to do with your luck. Here in Michigan in a normal winter we would never get away without mouse guards.  The mice come in after the bee's cluster and chew through all the bottom frames.  The bee's are only inches away but dont break cluster.   
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MTWIBadger
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« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2012, 09:55:19 PM »

I use a reduced entrance(3 inches by 3/8 inch) all year long.  It helps my hives defend against yellow jackets as well as robbing. I haven't had an issue with mice because of the entrance I use.
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