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Author Topic: Mite Treatment and TBH  (Read 1812 times)
jgarzasr
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« on: September 27, 2005, 02:06:53 PM »

some questions:

I placed a bottom tray in my hive and after 48 hours there was a mite count of about 60-75.  I believe that this is high enough for treatment.  Should I treat these bees?  and if so what is everyone using?  I am leaning towards Apistan Strips.... does this contaminate any drawn comb?  Also what is the cut off date for treatment?

Other questions is on Top Bar Hives.  I really would like to move towards these hives - mainly because of ease and affordability.  Is it possible next spring to convert my current two hives from Lanstroth to TBH - and if so what is the easiest?

Thanks for all the replies.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2005, 02:45:06 PM »

>I placed a bottom tray in my hive and after 48 hours there was a mite count of about 60-75.

In 24 hours that averages 30-37 mites.

> I believe that this is high enough for treatment.

Maybe.  It's on the border.

> Should I treat these bees?

Your choice.

> and if so what is everyone using?

I would use oxalic acid vapor if it was me.  Depending on the dimensions of your TBH you could either drill a hole in the front (or if you have one already use that) and use the pipe evaporator.  Or put a box on top with a gap between the bars.  Whatever works with what you have.

> Apistan Strips.... does this contaminate any drawn comb?

Absolutely, they will containate the comb.

> Also what is the cut off date for treatment?

It depends on your climate.  Ideally you'd use it after brood rearing stops and pull it before the cold sets in too much to be opening the hive.  Here that would be middle October and pull it out when the instrutions say.  You may have to open when it's cold and just pull the strips without messing too much with the hive.  Since it's a top bar hive it should be easy enough to pull the strips from between the bars without exposing the bees to the cold.

>Other questions is on Top Bar Hives. I really would like to move towards these hives - mainly because of ease and affordability. Is it possible next spring to convert my current two hives from Lanstroth to TBH - and if so what is the easiest?

It's much easier to go the other way.  It's easy enough to cut combs out and tie them into frames.  It's not easy to cut combs and put them onto top bars.  Of course you can do a shaken swarm and put them in a top bar hive.  You can build a top bar hive that is langstroth dimensions and put the frames in it with some top bars.  Most of mine are long medium Langstroth dimensions that will take medium frames or top bars.
 
It's worth having some "swarm catching frames" that fit your top bar hive.  Just adjust the dimensions:

http://www.beesource.com/plans/swarmfrm.pdf
http://www.beesource.com/plans/scf/index.htm

With these, you can just cut the brood combs out of the Langstroth and put them in the top bar.  You can also salvage crooked combs and fallen combs and do cutouts from trees and houses and put them in your top bar hive.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
FredBorn
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« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2005, 06:18:47 PM »

I think you are way beyond point that you should treat.

I have used Sucrocide with success.

Its labor intensive, but safe, and can be done at any time.

fred citrus county Florida
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2005, 07:48:17 AM »

http://www.capabees.ca/PDF/nelsonnav/varthres299deccbj.pdf#search='varroa%20economic%20threshold'

This study says an overnight drop of 59-187 is the economic threshold.

Some quote about 100.  Some quote about 50.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
jgarzasr
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« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2005, 09:21:50 AM »

Thanks for the replies - I kind of thought maybe I was a little beyond the point of when I should have started treating. When I was doing hive inspections - I would look over the bees and never seen any sign of mites - but when I put the bottom tray is when they showed - I guess they were mainly in the bottom brood box.  I now wish I would have been using the tray all season - that was ignorance on my part.

Michael - I was looking at the link you posted in another thread - http://bwrangler.bravehost.com/bee/goxa.htm.  Is this the evaporator you use?  Also do I need a screened bottom for the mite drop?  I am trying to grasp exactly on what to buy/build for this evaporator - is there any other info that may help?

Our weather here (Michigan) is still staying in the high 70's - but not for long.  I have to think about treatment fast... and I hope my Bees make it for the winter - If not I will be really disappointed.
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jgarzasr
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« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2005, 11:22:23 AM »

After doing some research on the net - I think I am going to pick up some Sucrocide and give it a try.  I am thinking since I have only two hives the labor should not be too bad.  Would a wagner type sprayer work for application?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2005, 01:45:23 PM »

>http://bwrangler.bravehost.com/bee/goxa.htm. Is this the evaporator you use?

The top one, yes.

>Also do I need a screened bottom for the mite drop?

What are you using?  A sticky board will work or a SBB with a tray will work.  What are you using?

>I am trying to grasp exactly on what to buy/build for this evaporator - is there any other info that may help?

The page you listed is pretty good.  What else do you want to know?

>Our weather here (Michigan) is still staying in the high 70's - but not for long. I have to think about treatment fast... and I hope my Bees make it for the winter - If not I will be really disappointed.

Actually I like to do it when there is NO brood in the hive, which usually happens HERE about mid to late October.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
imabkpr
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« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2005, 07:31:14 PM »

Quote from: jgarzasr
After doing some research on the net - I think I am going to pick up some Sucrocide and give it a try.  I am thinking since I have only two hives the labor should not be too bad.  Would a wagner type sprayer work for application?
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    tgarzasr;  what part of michigan are you in?            imabkpr
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jgarzasr
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« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2005, 12:29:26 PM »

I just received a pint of Sucrocide.  So I plan on treating my bees ASAP.  Anyone have any suggestions on application.  I know it states to use a garden type sprayer - would I get away with using just a spray bottle?  I only have two hives - so I don't think it should be too hard - but would like some opinions.  I also do not have any bottom tray (screen bottom board, sticky tray) - should I have one of these to catch the dead mites - or will the bees rid of them?  Thanks for the feedback.
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Dick Allen
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« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2005, 01:17:32 AM »

These are the instructions for calibrating a garden type sprayer for applying the recommended amount of sucrocide:

At the recommended dilution (0.25% active ingredient), the amount per full frame of bees required by the label is approximately 1.5 ounces (0.75 ounce/each side of frame). To calibrate the sprayer, first determine a mark for a known liquid measure in a disposable cup. For example, fill the cup with 6 ounces of water and then mark the fill location on the side of the cup. Next, adjust the sprayer to deliver a broad fine mist. Using the marked cup determine the number of seconds required to fill the cup to the mark. To determine the spray rate for your sprayer, divide the number of seconds by the number of ounces. For example, if it takes 16 seconds to fill a cup to the 6 ounce mark, then the sprayer is delivering 1.5 ounces in 4 seconds. To deliver this recommended amount to a frame using this sprayer, each side of each frame should be sprayed for 2 seconds. The distance should be adjusted (typically 9-12 inches) and the movement of the spray wand across the frame timed to maximize the spray coverage of bees. After being treated the bees will look very wet and appear rather bedraggled. However, within a few hours, the bees will again appear normal.

A spray bottle can be calibrated in a similar way. Some time ago I checked one and 6 ounces required 220 pumps.  220 pumps divided by 6 ounces will give you 36 pumps per ounce. For the 1.5 ounces recommended per frame: (36 pumps/ounce) X (1.5 ounce recommended) required 54 pumps per frame or 28 pumps per side.  That’s going to take a lot of pumping for an entire hive.
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