Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 28, 2014, 07:14:47 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Mite counts  (Read 2712 times)
funbee1
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 42

Location: Avoca,MI


« on: September 01, 2012, 05:08:14 PM »

This is my first year of beekeeping and I keep seeing all different numbers for mite counts.

I started three hives this spring from three pound packages. Two have done very well and one has struggled(lots of dead and crawling bees in front of hive plus lost queen).

I did my first sticky board mite count and got just about 100 mites in 28 hours on each of the hives. My best hive actually had 50 dead bees on it, several of which had visible mites on them.

I will do two more days of sticky boards just to have a better sample.

Seems like a lot of mites for first year hives.

What is the best count method?
What is the number at which I should panic?
Is there a point when there is no saving a colony and I should just harvest all honey and buy new bees in the Spring?

Thanks,
scott
Logged
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8107

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2012, 07:16:42 PM »

There is no correct answers to those questions.   Way too many variables and too many different beeks out doing it all different ways.  And the not saving a hive, only when the hive is beyond saving.   And that is normally when there are not enough bees left in the hive to make it.  Do a fall treatment for the mites to knock them down before winter.
Logged
Steer53
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1

Location: Heron Lake, Minnesota


« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2012, 09:29:24 AM »

Funbee1, wondering if you had a update on your situation?
Logged
sawdstmakr
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2622


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2012, 12:17:09 PM »

Sounds to me like you need new queens with better hygienics traits. If you can keep these bees alive this winter, I would get new queens in the spring.
Jim
Logged
Gary and Margaret - kiwimana
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 43


Location: Auckland, New Zealand


WWW
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2012, 06:08:25 PM »

Hi,

There are many methods to count mites, the best advice to to stick to the same method, so you can compare your counts from month to month.

We use a drop count over three days with our Meshboards, and divide the mite count by the three.  Which gives us an average drop rate per day.

We generally treat if we get more than twenty a day.

Here is a blog post we did that explains the process in more detail:-
http://kiwimana.co.nz/2012/02/11/mite-counting-with-a-kiwimana-meshboard/

Logged

Thanks

Gary and Margaret
We blog and Podcast at http://kiwimana.co.nz
Linda32
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 9

Location: Australia


« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2013, 02:34:35 PM »

And that is normally when there are not enough bees remaining in the hive to create it.  Do a drop strategy to the insects to affect them down before winter.
Logged

sawdstmakr
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2622


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2013, 10:29:10 PM »

And that is normally when there are not enough bees remaining in the hive to create it.  Do a drop strategy to the insects to affect them down before winter.

If you don't treat them, the bees that survive are the ones that have the genetics to handle the mites and the beetles. And then you have a much stronger stock to build from.
Jim
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2013, 04:55:11 AM »

This is my first year of beekeeping and I keep seeing all different numbers for mite counts.

I started three hives this spring from three pound packages. Two have done very well and one has struggled(lots of dead and crawling bees in front of hive plus lost queen).

I did my first sticky board mite count and got just about 100 mites in 28 hours on each of the hives. My best hive actually had 50 dead bees on it, several of which had visible mites on them.

situation is really bad. You need treatment at once. You need not count any more.

Formic acid and thymol treatments are meant to broodhives.
Oxalic acid destroyes brood too much.

Sugar dusting is uneffective.

 
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2013, 05:04:03 AM »

There is no correct answers to those questions.   Way too many variables and too many different beeks out doing it all different ways.  And the not saving a hive, only when the hive is beyond saving.   And that is normally when there are not enough bees left in the hive to make it.  Do a fall treatment for the mites to knock them down before winter.

there are very correct answers that situation. Rearchers have carefully revieled out, what to do. 

You need not follow all advices what these "catch and release" beeks here arvice, or those "do nothing guys".

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2013, 09:32:53 AM »

Part of the problem with thresholds on mite counts is none that I have seen take into account the size of the colony, the time of year, the amount of brood etc.  The number of mites that is normal in the spring is much smaller than the number that is normal in the fall when brood rearing ceases and all the mites are phoretic.

The typical numbers quoted, however, are 50 or so mites in a 24 hour natural drop being the economic threshold.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2013, 12:28:01 PM »

.
We speak NOW About 3 hives which are in bad condition. One is loosing its brood.
It is March now and not fall. Colonies should be quite clean.
But fact is that if the hive has not brood break, mite killing is laborous job.

3 weeks treatment with thymol or with formic acid with flash treatment.


.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Bradeeen
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15

Location: Australia


« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2013, 05:07:41 AM »

According to my opinion you can't count mites. Some of these are not effect our normal life but some of these are very harmful and cause of many diseases for us. There are many methods to count mites, the best advice to to stick to the same method, so you can compare your counts from month to month.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.234 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 03, 2014, 07:53:06 PM
anything