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Author Topic: treeated wood for hive building  (Read 2068 times)
garlicfarmer
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« on: August 22, 2012, 03:41:24 PM »

does treated wood work for hive building?  any thoughts.  Thanks Tom
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David McLeod
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2012, 04:35:18 PM »

NO
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hardwood
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2012, 06:12:06 PM »

I won't use it myself but others have tried it with good results.

Scott
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2012, 07:17:02 PM »

Bees will live in about anything, but if you’re going to eat the honey, it would be prudent to avoid chemically treated wood.  Of course the old treated wood had some arsenic in it.  The new stuff has compounds of copper as I understand it.  The bees eventually get the inside of a hive so covered with propolis that it is weather proof.  If you have the outside painted, then you have protection on the inside and the outside without having to resort to treated wood. 

I don’t recall seeing much treated lumber in 1x form at the places I shop.  Most of the treated stuff seems to be for the decking industry and about 5/4s thick.  Yes, that would have a slightly better R value than standard 1x lumber, however it is also heavier.  If you want more insulation in Michigan, I think foam is the way to go Wink  It’s way more weather proof than wood too  Smiley
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AllenF
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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2012, 07:21:27 PM »

All the bee supply houses sell copper naphthenate to treat wood.   But there have lots of study with that treatment, so you can google it later.  The bees due coat everything inside the hive but I don't/ won't use it, or any green treated lumber inside the hive.   
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David McLeod
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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2012, 10:51:17 PM »

Applying copper napthenate to properly dried, milled and assembled hive furniture is fine. The common syp pressure treat commonly available is still dripping wet as you get from the yard. It will move and will not retain any sort of dimensional stability.
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danno
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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2012, 08:17:07 AM »

I use treated lumber on all my pallets.  I build these in fall and winter and through them outside to weather until needed in april/May.   Never had a issue
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2012, 09:18:35 AM »

David is right about the treated stuff still dripping wet when picked up at some of the big box stores.  I picked up a few 1x6 treated planks a few months ago...really heavy and "wet"....makes you start looking around for some gloves or a rag or something before handling them.  I left them in a dry building until a few days ago and they were dried nicely BUT definitely more "wavy".  Conversely, about 20 years ago I bought a bunch of the old deadly stuff to build a deck with...that wood was (and is) much more dimensionally stable than what I see today.   I ripped some narrow pieces from this new stuff to place under the side runners on my bottom boards to raise them up 3/4"...that worked good and them being treated will help them last, of course the paint would've done that anyhow.  I figure with the treated wood and then painting that those runners will give the cockroaches something to crawl on when the rest of civilization is gone.  grin  

A good coat or two of some decent exterior latex, paying special attention to the end grain, and I think the woodenware will last plenty long enough...indefinitely if more paint is put on in several years.

Hive stands and maybe bottom boards seem ok, but I don't think I would want the off-the-shelf treated stuff inside with my bees and honey.

Ed

ETA... danno's got the right idea....if you use it, throw it out there and let it "cure" in the elements.
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« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2012, 03:01:25 PM »

I would limit the use of pressure treated wood to it's intended use, ground contact. I never bought into the whole chemical issue, though hive products are foodstuffs, it is there are far better options for hive parts where stability, machinability, lightness and durability are concerned. Now for stands, pallets and other assorted items that come between the hives and mother Earth pressure treat is an excellent option if wood is used.

BTW it would be a bad idea to use a piece of pressure treat between the standard bottom board and cinder block so many of us use. Current building code in most areas require treated wood for contact with cement/concrete.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
Intheswamp
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« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2012, 03:07:28 PM »


BTW it would be a bad idea to use a piece of pressure treat between the standard bottom board and cinder block so many of us use. Current building code in most areas require treated wood for contact with cement/concrete.

Typo?
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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev

"Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they wont come to yours." - Yogi Berra
David McLeod
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« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2012, 03:13:32 PM »

wouldn't

darn auto correct on this phone.

The lime in concrete does bad things the raw wood and the treated is a barrier of sorts to termites and wdo.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
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