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Author Topic: What's your favorite stand for bee hives?  (Read 5758 times)
Anonymous
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« on: September 28, 2005, 04:25:44 PM »

I'm having a change of heart.  I've been using concrete blocks, but they're cumbersome when buying in quantity.  Also, I've had trouble leveling them and then the ground heaves up under them in the winter making them un-level again.  I'm considering making a frame out of 8 foot long 1x4's (treated) with 2x4 cross members in a long H pattern.  Then, instead of setting this directly on the ground like I've seen, I was going to cut up RR ties to put under each end and maybe in the middle.  I figure this will support three hives nicely spaced and get them up off the ground where I can manage them better.

What do you think and what do you like to use for larger set-ups?

P.S.  I had posted in an earlier thread about buying and moving 30 hives.  That's going to be a reality here very shortly.

Thanks!
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2005, 04:43:37 PM »

These are 2x6 boards bolted to 4x4 fence post. The post sit on flat square stones bought from a building material store. Since this picture was taken, one hive was added to another reducing the number to three. There are now three deeps on each hive and I was worried about the long back board starting to sag and placed an old bumper jack under it.

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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2005, 06:02:39 PM »

I put two eight foot treated four by fours down and level them and put the hives in a row (five ten frame or six eight frame hives) on that.  But then I also have top entrances to make up for the skunks beging able to get to them.  If you don't like the treated, cedar or redwood would work.
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Michael Bush
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manowar422
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2005, 06:31:40 PM »

John,
Since your talking about 30 hives, howzabout this Cool

http://www.source1parts.com/Catalog/pdf/p228.pdf
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Jay
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« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2005, 06:40:05 PM »

I have pressure treated 2x8's and 4x4's screwed together in a rectangle and then the 4x4's screwed onto the inside. My stands are buried 18 inches in the ground and stand 18 inches above ground. This makes them solid (I can stand on it and it doesn't move) and it also gets them up off the ground away from skunks and racoons enough so that the girls can take care of themselves through any attempts.

I also like to make them long enough for 3 hives but I only put 2 on (one on each end) so when I work the hives I can take them appart and stack the pieces in the middle and not have to bend and stoop so much with those heave boxes! Cheesy

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2005, 07:17:31 PM »

Here's some pros and cons.  If you have the hive furhter up off the ground (and you haven't already gone to upper entrances only like me) then the skunks can't bother it so much, but you have to have a ladder to put on the top super.  If you have the hive closer to the ground you don't have to lift supers so high.
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Michael Bush
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2005, 07:26:52 PM »

Tailgate of a pickup works for me.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2005, 10:09:12 PM »

Hm.  Some interesting ideas.  Condenser pads?   shocked    Cheesy

I'm trying to keep it as simple as possible and keep from any permanent constructions.  I really like Jay's idea of burying the posts in the ground and might just do that with my hives at the house.  But for this new 30 hive project, I need to remain flexible.

I'd also like to keep the hives within about 10 inches of the ground, for lifting and stacking supers.  And if the skunks start pawing at the fronts of the hives, well, I've got access to carpet tack strips   Cool

Does anybody use weed stop fabric under their hives?  I've been using mulched up pine trees, but the weeds eventually take hold even in that.

Thanks!!
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Ross
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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2005, 09:57:00 PM »

Here are pictures of my knock down stand made from treated 1x6 fence pickets.  Very cheap to build, holds 3-4 hives.
http://www.myoldtools.com/feeder/stand2.jpg
http://www.myoldtools.com/feeder/stand3.jpg
http://www.myoldtools.com/feeder/stand1.jpg
http://www.myoldtools.com/feeder/stand4.jpg
http://www.myoldtools.com/feeder/stand5.jpg
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Finsky
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« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2005, 01:36:40 AM »

During summer I use lower stand and during winter about  one feet high.

I move bees from pasture to another during summer.

Here hives got 300 lbs load honey at same time. The tower is at the level of my head. It is maximum to nice handle.

http://bees.freesuperhost.com/yabbfiles/Attachments/valmis3.jpg

Here you see wooden stand. Their legs  rotten quite quickly.

http://bees.freesuperhost.com/yabbfiles/Attachments/Kuva_051.jpg

.
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Finsky
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« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2005, 01:47:28 AM »

Quote from: manowar422
John,
Since your talking about 30 hives, howzabout this Cool

http://www.source1parts.com/Catalog/pdf/p228.pdf


I started to use light conrete this summer and it is splended.
This will be my course.

My 2 heavy hives falled down this summer when rain made soft the muddy field.  150 lbs honey falled down and some stryrofoam boxes broke. Really expencive. - seems that I am getting old. This was first time.
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Finsky
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« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2005, 01:50:56 AM »

When you got  honey 200 lbs per hive each and you have 2 meter high box towers, you will be in trouble.  Tongue

http://bees.freesuperhost.com/yabbfiles/Attachments/valmis3.jpg

Quite pale landscape you have. No trees to stop winds.


Quote from: Jerrymac




.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2005, 09:35:00 AM »

Yeah I might rework the stands this winter. Put more legs under it.

No we don't have any trees around here. The only trees in this part of the country is what ever man has planted. No problem. We only get winds around 30 Miles per hour to 75 miles per hour through out the year. Spring time is usually the windiest part of the year.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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Martha
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« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2005, 09:59:05 AM »

I place old composite shingles on the ground under and around the hives. No weed wacking or mowing. I use concrete blocks - but I don't move my hives around.

Martha in KC
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ApisM
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« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2005, 11:18:57 AM »

I put my hives on wooden shipping pallets.  Works well.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2005, 08:03:56 PM »

Cinder blocks work for me.
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« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2005, 09:19:09 PM »

I dig a relatively even hole about six inches deep, 17 inches long, and 24 inches wide.  On that I apply leveling sand, and if there are trees nearby I will spread a layer of cement.  Ontop of the sand I peice of treated plywood, then bricks, and finally the two cinder blocks that actually hold up the colony.  I've found it to work pretty well.  So far it hasn't sagged in any direction by 1 degree!  However, it's not very portable...
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Anonymous
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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2005, 01:25:26 PM »

Quote from: Ross


Wow.  Those are pretty cool, Ross!  I'll have to post pics of what I ended up with, but here's a quick description:

I took eight foot treated 2x4's and nailed them together ladder fashion with three 18" pieces of 2x4.  Then, I cut treated 6x6's into 32" length's.  I arrange three 6x6's on the ground, then place the 2x4 ladder on top.

I only put three hives on each 8 foot ladder, but I could put four pretty easily.

Oh, yeah.  And the whole thing sets on landscape fabric that I tack to the ground.

Pictures to follow soon.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2005, 10:22:29 PM »

Quote
I place old composite shingles on the ground under and around the hives. No weed wacking or mowing. I use concrete blocks - but I don't move my hives around.


I like this idea.  Got a bunch of old shingles I can use too.  Thanks for mentioning that.
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Ross
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« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2005, 10:41:37 PM »

Best features of mine:  They're portable (knock down) and they cost about $2 to build.
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« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2005, 05:24:48 PM »

If you are setting up 30 hives, don't spend time digging or building fancy stands. You don't have time. p.s. how old are you?  & do you have a family?  I would take a look around and find some hardwood pallets.  The width of a pallet holds two hives well, allowing you to work around them.  Cut the depth of the pallets to 21" so you can have access to the back without leanning over to much.  Put said pallets on ground and place hive on.  If you need to move the hives,.. 30 new hives may not be in the best location, you can work straps around with out lifting.  If your one of the lucky ones with a forklift etc. can lift your pairs of hive up onto your bed of your truck.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #21 on: October 24, 2005, 01:58:30 PM »

"p.s. how old are you?"

46 and holding

"& do you have a family?"

Yes, but our 4 year old can't lift much...   rolleyes  cheesy

"If your one of the lucky ones with a forklift "

Nope, that would be nice.  Got the hives set up now.  Had to shim the back of a couple stands to get them leaning forward a little.  I'm still working on those pictures...  Hopefully I'll be able to post before snow fall!   wink

Oh, one last note, the locations where I had to place these hives required that they be neat and orderly looking, otherwise I probably would have just picked up some palets from work and used them.
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