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Author Topic: Trapout troubles  (Read 937 times)
gardeningfireman
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« on: July 31, 2012, 11:21:40 AM »

 After a week of no activity, I removed the bait hive and the cone. Yesterday evening, I went to seal it all up. There were several dozen bees returning to the entrance. Some had full pollen baskets! hissy fit
I have a trapout set up on the other side of the chimney, where I think the queen went when she left the first location. I sprayed beequick into the entrance to see if any bees came out of the second location (in case they were connected). None came out of either entrance. This is getting REALLY frustrating, both for me and the homeowner. Now I am thinking a small "after-swarm" moved in. I guess it's back to square one!
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Sundog
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2012, 04:42:41 PM »

Perhaps there is another entrance that you have yet to discover.

Sounds like fun!
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AllenF
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2012, 07:10:29 PM »

How long did you leave the cone there?   And did you give them time to be robbed out after the cone was removed?  I would also bet on there was another entrance to that hive. 
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David McLeod
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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2012, 07:49:56 PM »

I'll second the alternate entrance. It's amazing the lengths I have seen bees go to find an alternate exit. I did a cut out last year where the visible exit on the exterior was to the right side of a double 3'0"  picture window at the sill. My thermometer told me the brood nest was under the left side sill. Upon peeling back the sheetrock the evidence was plain to see. Someone had attempted to seal the original entrance at the left side but the bees were traversing the entire width between the fiberboard sheating and brick to exit where they were.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
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www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
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gardeningfireman
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« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2012, 09:14:36 PM »

I caulked everything within about 12 feet. I looked, but saw no evidence anywhere else on that end of the house or the front or rear. Also watched the roofline around the chimney and saw nothing. I removed the cone after about a week of no activity. After I took the cone off, I left it for over a week to get robbed out. Probably too long; that is why I think an "secondary" swarm moved in.
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David McLeod
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« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2012, 09:22:36 PM »

A swarm is possible as vacant comb is a perfect swarm trap. Also be advised that caulk is not chew proof and bees can chew.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
gardeningfireman
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« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2012, 11:31:22 PM »

I use silicone caulk. I know (from experience) that they can get through latex caulk. Have not had that problem with silicone.
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JPBEEGETTER
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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2012, 05:04:35 PM »

I have devised a solution to finalizing trap-outs.                   I took a bee package box stapled the cover on after hole sawing a entrance feeder hole , hole sawed 1 1/4" hole in one end to insert a small cone, hole sawed a 2" thick block in which to insert the 1 1/4 vinil hose. Then put it atop the catch box run the vinil hose from the trap cone to the 2" thick block in the end of the bee package box . then if there are still bees in the trap out hole you can tell (you can't spend 24 hrs a day watching cone).. How I found that there were still bees in hive.  Also might be able to catch queen. leave it a week and feed them ,,see what happens.
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