Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 17, 2014, 04:36:07 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: question about swarm cell and a split  (Read 543 times)
adamant
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 332


Location: sewell n.j.


« on: July 29, 2012, 04:23:52 PM »

i split a hive on the 16th of july. today i checked of the split and the one queen right and the other is booming but has a swarm cell!

is that normal?
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2012, 05:21:47 PM »

.
Bees' life does not follow "normal" course.
British beekeepers like to speak about consensus.
Bees love to arrange surprises to new beekepers.
It took 7 years to me that they did not arranged big surprices to me.

 
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3945

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2012, 06:26:05 PM »

If you’ve got swarm cells, maybe it’s time for another split?  They make nice queens.
Logged
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8070

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2012, 06:27:53 PM »

Make sure your current queen is not failing.  Or has already fallen?
Logged
sterling
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 819

Location: mt juliet tn


« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2012, 12:29:55 PM »

That queen cell could be a supersedure cell.
Logged
BrentX
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 156

Location: North Star Delaware


« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2012, 02:48:45 PM »

Sounds about right.  I would do a close inspection of the queenless hive, most likely there are not just one but multiple queen cells by now.  If not I would add a frame of fresh eggs.  One queen cell is too few to bet on in my opinion.  If there are many queen cells you have the option of splitting them into another hive,  if you have plenty bees. 

Once having done that leave them alone.  The timeline is 21 days from egg being layed to emerging queen.  It will be a month- mid August before there is a fertilized queen laying eggs. 

Splitting now is a great way to drop the mite population.  However, these hives need to be strong with many bees to build up enough before winter.
Logged
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2012, 03:01:26 PM »

21 days is worker brood...Drones are 24 and queens are 16.

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.122 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page March 09, 2014, 10:30:12 AM