Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 17, 2014, 03:24:20 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: moving bees 30 miles-recommendations?  (Read 1386 times)
Algonam
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 195

Location: Ottawa,Ontario,Canada


« on: July 28, 2012, 07:49:53 AM »

Good morning,
I hope to move 1 hive back to another site tonight. It was a split that was taken from a hive in this apiary on June 6th. They are doing OK, with about 6 frames of brood/honey etc. I was hoping to move it back tonight and get it set up with the intention of another brood box on top in another week.
I have the hive stand built and ready to go.
Although it has been dry, we have some low lying areas around where there are flowers in the gulleys and swamps. Lots of bush.
I was  going to do this after dark so that all of the bees will be home, and block them in with wood and screening.
I will have the main body of the hive screwed to the base and the top cover with additional supports to hold it all together as 1 unit.

Do you have any other recommendations? I haven't done this before
Logged


Oh Canada!
Joe D
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1806

Location: Ovett, Ms


« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2012, 08:57:40 AM »

In your moving hives, I just put rolled up screen in the entrance where they can't get out, put a tie down strap around the hive and move it.  If it is to heavy to carry I have a dolly.  After I get the hive to where it is going and set up I already have some limbs cut and laying ready, I put them in front of entrance and the bees will
reorient them selves.  I do this even when just moving a few feet, so far has worked for me.  Good luck with your bees.



Joe
Logged
David McLeod
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 701


Location: Hampton

Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution


WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2012, 09:19:05 AM »

Pretty much like Joe. Ratchet straps have become as indispensable as duct tape to me. I use pieces of cobra ridge vent material http://www.gaf.com/roofing/residential/products/roof-vents/cobra-exhaust-vent/cobra-exhaust-vent.aspx about 2" wide and the length of the entrance folded in half lengthwise and wedged into the entrance. I just be sure to have everything straped tight so wedging the entrance doesn't move everything around.
I use the cobra because it is what I always have on hand since I also do wildlife and honeybee exclusions and the cobra is the best I have seen for a stuff it type of material to plug gaps.
As far as transport goes I use a hitch hauler that fits into a standard square receiver hitch on the back of my truck. I can haul three hives on it and it saves me from have to unload the truck to make room, I have a fiberglass topper and ladder rack and the bed stays loaded with traps and other junk. The hitch hauler has been a God send during swarm season as I can always keep a small stack of boxes and my bee vac with me where ever I go. That and a few pieces of PVC pipe on the ladder rack and no swarm is out of reach.

Now the next thing I am going to be looking for is a trailer to haul ten or more hives to outyards and some sort of lift or hand truck. Anyone have any recommendations/
Logged

Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11660


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2012, 11:28:06 AM »

Sounds like your bees are in one hive body correct?

I use a heavy duty stapler "with extra wide" crown staples and staple my bottom boards in place as well as my top covers. If you are moving a one or two box set up you should not have the need to to ratchet them in place. Three boxes or more you certainly do.

If you are in fact moving the hive 30 miles back to its original location there is no need to add branches or anything else in front of the hive for orientation purposes. That is only needed if you are moving them a short distance. Anything under 1/4 mile.

If you will be driving straight through to the bee yard without any stops with overhead lighting you really don't even need to seal the hive. Be aware however they will likely be a little runny when you arrive at the new location and you will need to smoke them some before you take them out of the truck.


...JP
« Last Edit: July 28, 2012, 09:08:36 PM by JP » Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2012, 11:41:05 AM »

.
A mesh piece to entrance. Twist it to groove and put toalet paper or foamlastc that you tighten boath ends of te mesh.
- stansport mesh in one inch x two inch wooden frames
- load belt what you may tighten

- carry in two pieces if one block has not room in sedan.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
mikecva
Field Bee
***
Online Online

Posts: 552


Location: Northern Virginia USA


« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2012, 03:25:12 PM »

I agree with most of what has been recommended, and would only add: have the frames parallel (in line with)  to the line of travel to reduce the rocking/bouncing of the frames against each other. Also feed when you get to the new site. -Mike
« Last Edit: July 29, 2012, 06:08:12 PM by mikecva » Logged

.
.
Listen to others but make your own decisions. That way you own the results.
.
.
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2012, 04:05:43 PM »

I agree with most of what has been recommended, and would only add: have the frames perpendicular to the line of travel to reduce the rocking/bouncing of the frames against each other. Also feed when you get to the new site. -Mike

i forgot this. It is very necessary to lock frames so that they do not shiver or rock there.
First victim is a fat queen, which I have loosed often because of moving frames.

I use foam plastic beween wall and frame or clump of comb wax in the corner of sidemost frame.


Everyting must be safe and tight. If you push brakes suddenly or if you hit to a pothole.

. i
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 8070

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2012, 07:03:19 PM »

Don't open up any of the boxes to keep everything glued down.   
Logged
Algonam
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 195

Location: Ottawa,Ontario,Canada


« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2012, 08:11:32 PM »

Thank you everyone.
It now looks like this will be done tomorrow night.
As for loose frames, these bees have it pretty gummed up with propolis etc. I expect this will hold it all tight.
Most videos I watch don't have the level of propolis we have here. Ours tend to be totally gummed up and very hard to remove frames.
Logged


Oh Canada!
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11660


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2012, 09:11:59 PM »

Just take it easy and don't drive like a mad man and they should be fine.

...JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
Bleemus
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 20

Location: East Dorset, Vermont


« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2012, 08:36:48 AM »

A wedge of screen in the entrance, ratchet strap the whole thing and slide it onto a dolly. Done it a few times, simple as pie.

Logged
Algonam
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 195

Location: Ottawa,Ontario,Canada


« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2012, 06:42:16 PM »

Thanks for all of your advice.
 I actually moved the bees at 4am this morning. The weather has been so hot the bees have been out on the entrance during the nights. Finally last night it got cool enough (14C) for the bees to stay inside, until I tried stuffing the screening in their entrance and they came out to great me! Only a few got out before I stapled the screening on. I carried them out to my pickup tuck, then covered them up with a knitted blanket my wife had on the basement sofa (she knows now!).
The drive was 35 minutes and the bees did well. I was the one that was stressed! I got them set up just after sunrise and they will hopefully do well.
As usual the next time I will do a few things differently!

Logged


Oh Canada!
stella
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 199

Location: Central Minnesota


« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2012, 11:24:36 PM »

Congrats Algonam! That was a huge first experience, Im sure! Get your heart rate up a bit? He he he.
Glad you got it done.
Your wife will forgive you. Bees are more important than a blanket... Wink
Logged

“The hum of bees is the voice of the garden.” — Elizabeth Lawrence
JPBEEGETTER
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 175

Location: ARCHDALE NC


« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2012, 09:19:06 AM »

I make most things in my bee yard, enjoy thinking up projects so here it is for moving bees.  I take piece of 1/2 X 1 1/2, wood or plywood, cut same as length of entrance, hole saw   3 1" holes spaced out from ends , staple screen to back, drill 2 holes near top .
place over entrance and run 2  sheet rock screws to hold closed.  even moving around yard works every time and loose no bees. Also use ratchet straps to hold together. Prepare  for next time..
Logged
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3945

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2012, 10:42:39 AM »

OK, what do you do when the best plans of beeks fails and the bees get loose inside the car  huh
Thousands of bees......

I had this problem this morning.  Was moving some of my foam hives to another yard and went down a very bumpy road.  Duct tape came off hives and the bees poured out into the car.  I’m still trying to get them out now….. shocked

I use a trailer for hauling the bees down smooth roads, but I decided to try putting a few hives in the car this morning since the suspension is better in the car.     
Logged
Algonam
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 195

Location: Ottawa,Ontario,Canada


« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2012, 08:21:58 PM »

JPBEEGETTER, This is similar to what I was thinking of doing for the next time but better. I was going to wrap and entrance reducer with screening and then attach it. Your way is even better than that! Thank you.

BlueBee, I'd try to bait them with honey by leaving some honey in a box in your car. Remove when full!
Logged


Oh Canada!
JPBEEGETTER
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 175

Location: ARCHDALE NC


« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2012, 08:42:27 AM »

One thing I forgot to mention , always face the entrance to rear of bed, trailer, what ever mode of hauling..
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.816 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page April 16, 2014, 01:39:05 PM