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Author Topic: No pollen  (Read 524 times)
yockey5
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« on: July 23, 2012, 05:51:29 PM »

It has been over a month since I have seen any pollen coming in. I am getting concerned for my May split, and my early July swarm.
I have never used pollen patties.
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AllenF
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2012, 08:00:10 PM »

I am sure the bees are bringing in all they want.   
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wadehump
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2012, 08:22:44 PM »

Maybe not he is in a very hot dry drought with no rain the bees have quit rearing brood in some hives  Cry
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yockey5
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2012, 08:55:21 PM »

Maybe not he is in a very hot dry drought with no rain the bees have quit rearing brood in some hives  Cry

This is what has me concerned. Has anyone had any success with the pollen patties?
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AllenF
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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2012, 08:59:29 PM »

In very early spring and in small amounts at a time, yes.    This time of the year, patties would be great at raising a whole box full of SHB maggots.   Just open the buffet for them.   
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AllenF
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2012, 09:01:58 PM »

And there is pollen out there to be collected.   The bees just ain't bringing it in for a reason.   Grass puts out a lot of pollen this time of the year.  Patties are good when bees can not fly due to cold.
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yockey5
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2012, 09:22:58 PM »

I am hoping to have enuff time to get into the hives tomorrow.
Maybe I will be able to see what is going on then. My May split is a pissy bunch, but the queen has been so good I hope to make a 2nd winter with her.
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Finski
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2012, 10:24:55 PM »

.
It is then better to move the hive to area where it gets pollen. It cannot be so that every place has been dried up.

When it is heavy drought, it takes really long time that nature wakes up after drought.
After that situation hives are not able to overwinter. It needs heavy rains too to recover.

So split the hive, put a mesh to stop bees escape and move the hive to proper place.
Depending size of hive, it takes not much time.
.
If we have this time of year (end of July) difficult drought, the vegetation will not start new growing. It prepares itself to winter.


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