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Author Topic: apiguard and honey supers / what to do with the particle filled supers?  (Read 967 times)

Offline adamant

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i am going to treat with apiguard. i am getting it in the bucket with the thin metal sleeves that is used for placement on the apiguard. i have honey supers on. i was thinking to collect all  the frames of partially uncapped honey and put them in a super and place them on a strong hive. i will treat all my hives except the one's with the honey supers. after those hives are done treatments i will remove the honey supers and place them on the treated hives. and treat the one's that had the supers on.. what do u think? good plain?

Offline buzzbee

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Sounds okay,just wait the recommended amount of time before supering a treated hive.
Did you consider Miteaway quick strips? They are a formic acid assumed to be safe to use with honey supers on.

Offline dragonfly130

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Apiguard work's best when there is little to no brood rearing going on as it doesn't kill mites under the caps. Usually a fall treatment. It will work other times but will only kill the mites that are on the bee's.

Also I would not put super's back on recently treated hives. It does leave a residue(you will be able to smell it for a while) and builds up in wax.

I'm with Buzz this time of year consider Maqs. I treated 23 colonies 3rd week of June.  I checked 50% of them today and all are queenright, but supercedure cell's are in about 50% of the one's I checked. You will have some bee loss and it will burn some brood and the queen may get the blame hence the supercedure. I don't see it as all bad though as new young queen's going into fall, winter is a good thing. Also brood rearing should go up following treatment.  Watch your temp's with it though. i like to see it under 85 for at least three days.

Offline danno

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Heres the same question I had for you on the  bee source forum.   What is your rush to treat so early.  Is you season over?   Did you skip a spring treatment and now mites are out of control?
« Last Edit: July 20, 2012, 03:24:48 PM by danno »

Offline AllenF

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Some of us skipped spring and last fall treatments.    :-D

Offline buzzbee

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If you are treating,August seems to be the best time unless you have an extreme mite load. It is best to treat before September as they will be raising bees that are going to overwinter. The stronger your new brood is in the fall,the better they overwinter.And if you pull your honey,be starting to think about feeding in September and early October to replenish the hive and they can have it capped before cold weather.

 

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