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Author Topic: New guy here,Need help  (Read 1567 times)
jayden9385
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« on: July 16, 2012, 10:03:33 PM »

Hey guys first of all im new here i checked the different section on the forum but couldnt find a correct section to ask for help. i see alot of you guys are passionate about bees and what not im 26 year old from tampa florida and it was brought to my attention from my mother 2 years ago that they have come across a bee hive from underneath a trailer so to my astonishment for the first time in my life ive been able to see one up close. now they seem friendly so i dont think they are africanized honey bees thank god for that i wouldnt want anything to happen to my mom or dad. Anyways my father wants to get the bee hive removed hes actually thinking about killing it himself and what not i told him that could be dangerous but hes not listening to me my question is simple what would be the best way to deal with these bees? i know its quite expensive to get a bee keeper to come and get it removed so im trying to decide to exterminate them or find a way to get it removed safely, and maybe get some taste of that honey Cheesy anyways heres some pics.








Please respond with suggestion tips or anything please thanks!
« Last Edit: July 17, 2012, 06:18:12 AM by Robo » Logged
Sundog
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« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2012, 10:58:38 PM »

Where is the hive located?  Also, add your location to your profile, it will affect answers to your questions.

I know someone who might collect the bees for free, depending on how far and how difficult.

Have fun!
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G3farms
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« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2012, 03:42:05 AM »

If you have them sprayed are you still "wanting a taste of the honey", why would you want to eat poison??

The reason it is not cheap to remove bees is because it is a hard and dirty job that few folks are willing to take on and most times take the biggest part of the day to do it properly. Free bees.....yeah right, with the stress you are putting on the bees by removing them they might not even make it.
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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
jayden9385
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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2012, 08:58:28 AM »

Where is the hive located?  Also, add your location to your profile, it will affect answers to your questions.

I know someone who might collect the bees for free, depending on how far and how difficult.

Have fun!

Im in tampa,Florida in carrolwood village. i was watching on youtube a similar video of a guy removing a 200 lbs bee hive from underneath a trailor i was like omg thats heavy.

If you have them sprayed are you still "wanting a taste of the honey", why would you want to eat poison??

The reason it is not cheap to remove bees is because it is a hard and dirty job that few folks are willing to take on and most times take the biggest part of the day to do it properly. Free bees.....yeah right, with the stress you are putting on the bees by removing them they might not even make it.
and i dont want to kill the bees in reality i just meant my father wants to eliminate them and if its cheaper to do it that way ill let him do it and forget tasting the honey lol
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JackM
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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2012, 09:13:36 AM »

Jayden, try hard to talk him out of killing the bees.  Bees are a necessary part of life, like pooping.
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“I now have absolute proof that smoking even one marijuana cigarette is equal in brain damage to being on Bikini Island during an H-bomb blast” – Ronald Reagan
hardwood
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« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2012, 09:18:38 AM »

Country villiage cut out.wmv


Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
jayden9385
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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2012, 09:22:22 AM »

Jayden, try hard to talk him out of killing the bees.  Bees are a necessary part of life, like pooping.

Looool you know i saw on tv a document about bees dying on their own and its affecting the ecosystem since bees polinate the plants and farmers crops and what not so we really do need them. Just a question if they were africanize killer bees i would of known right? i mean i heard they are really aggressive so they would of most likely attacked my parents by now.
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JackM
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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2012, 10:07:15 AM »

I believe you do not have Africanized Honey Bees (AHB) from your description of them.  They sound like good calm honey bees that any beekeep would enjoy.  If I weren't at the other corner of the country I would help ya out.
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2012, 10:55:29 AM »

Advertise them on craigslist and in your local sales papers.  Some beekeeper would love to have those bees, especially a newbee or an experienced beekeeper looking for some new genes.  A 2-year old colony and undoubtedly some very calm bees....yelp, somebody wants'em!  Advertise it and your phone will start ringing. Smiley

" 2+ year old honey bee colony.  Very calm bees.  External colony.  Not sure of size of colony...I am not familiar with honey bee colonies.  Around seven combs of bees.  Should be a very easy removal from edge of trailer.   Needs moving ASAP to avoid extermination. "

If you post it on craigslist attach those pictures...it'll stir up some interest, just watch for nut-cases.  Undecided

Ed
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Javin
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« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2012, 12:53:57 PM »

Man.  Wish I was in the Florida area.  I'd LOVE to be able to get some new genes into my hives, and that looks like an exceptionally simple cut-out with a very high likelihood of success.  I second that you should be able to very easily find a local beek that would be stoked to get them. 
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jayden9385
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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2012, 01:34:49 PM »

wow you guys are great!!! i have to clear something up seems i was wrong about how long they been there i thought it was 2 years but seems my mom just corrected me and just told me they been there for 4 years and wow check this out after watching that video and a few more on youtube i got brave enough to stick my hand in the behive and scoop some up and guess what Nothing happened!!! they fairly gentle ofcourse i would never dare to anger them i just had to see with my own eyes. anyways im so grateful that i found this forum you guys are amazing i think i learned more in 2 days about bees than i ever knew in my whole lifetime!!! i will post back if anymore questions thank you so much guys!
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Javin
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« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2012, 01:47:44 PM »

You know, if you had any interest, these gals would be a GREAT way to start keeping your own hive.  The fact that they're 4 years old shows that they've managed to overwinter fairly well, so they'd probably make for a great hive.  You can pick up or build the equipment yourself, and I'd strongly recommend getting a veil/gloves (they won't be quite so calm when you start tearing apart the hive).

Due to the location, these guys would be super-easy to salvage.  Just carefully cut each piece of comb out, then stick it in a hive frame, using rubber bands around the frame to hold the comb in place.  The bees will eventually anchor the comb, and chew through the bands.  Make sure your hive box is beneath them while cutting out the comb to make sure you catch the queen if she falls, and after collecting all the comb and putting the frames in the box, you should already have a very well established be hive! 

Initial cost for equipment and gear would be around $100, I think, but way worth it if you've any interest in bee keeping.
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jayden9385
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« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2012, 01:54:02 PM »

You know, if you had any interest, these gals would be a GREAT way to start keeping your own hive.  The fact that they're 4 years old shows that they've managed to overwinter fairly well, so they'd probably make for a great hive.  You can pick up or build the equipment yourself, and I'd strongly recommend getting a veil/gloves (they won't be quite so calm when you start tearing apart the hive).

Due to the location, these guys would be super-easy to salvage.  Just carefully cut each piece of comb out, then stick it in a hive frame, using rubber bands around the frame to hold the comb in place.  The bees will eventually anchor the comb, and chew through the bands.  Make sure your hive box is beneath them while cutting out the comb to make sure you catch the queen if she falls, and after collecting all the comb and putting the frames in the box, you should already have a very well established be hive! 

Initial cost for equipment and gear would be around $100, I think, but way worth it if you've any interest in bee keeping.
Lol thats an idea but what do ya bee keepers do with bees do ya just keep them as a hobby or is there money to be made off their honey? and oh i was told not all bees create honeys is this true? and do you think the ones i have create honey? sorry for all the questions im super curious about the bee collecting world lol
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2012, 02:09:10 PM »

I went back and looked at the three pictures and I'm confused about something.  The top two pictures appear to be the same colony...about the same number of bees in each of these two pictures covering the comb (some comb is visible), the brown trim piece above them has the same scratch marks.  The bottom picture appears different in that the bees are completely covering the comb (no visible comb) and the scratch marks on the trim are not the same as the marks on the first two pictures, and the wiring to the side of the comb is different.  Looks like the same colony but probably two different angles?  Is this a utility trailer or a house trailer?

Making money with honey bees requires a lot of work and substantial investment.

Ed
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Javin
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« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2012, 02:20:22 PM »

When they say, "Not all bees create honey" they're referring to things like masonry bees, or carpenter bees.  All honey bees produce honey - and those are most certainly honey bees.

You have a wide range of people and as wide a range as why they keep their bees.  For me, I started for a series of reasons.  
   1.) Premature Rheumatoid Arthritis - Bee stings could potentially help with the symptoms.
   2.) The honey - I wanted to try my hand at making mead (honey wine) and honey is expensive!
   3.) I like honey - Most honey found in stores isn't "real" honey.  
   4.) I like to experiment - Ultimately, I will be doing experiments with my different colonies to check on some of my theories on why beekeeping seems harder for some than others.

Other people are all about the honey.  Some people focus on just the wax, and don't even collect the honey.  Some are after pollen, while others want the propolis.  And some just like the fact that it significantly helps the environment.

It all depends on what your own driving reasons are for becoming a Beek.  I will say, once you've got it started, and you get into doing the research (bees are absolutely fascinating creatures) you'll find yourself keeping more hives than just the one in no time!

All of this said, don't expect to be turning any significant profit with your bees until you have a hundred or so hives, and have gone straight commercial.  However, it's not unusual to get a hundred pounds of honey or so from a strong hive every year.
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jayden9385
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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2012, 03:46:55 PM »

I went back and looked at the three pictures and I'm confused about something.  The top two pictures appear to be the same colony...about the same number of bees in each of these two pictures covering the comb (some comb is visible), the brown trim piece above them has the same scratch marks.  The bottom picture appears different in that the bees are completely covering the comb (no visible comb) and the scratch marks on the trim are not the same as the marks on the first two pictures, and the wiring to the side of the comb is different.  Looks like the same colony but probably two different angles?  Is this a utility trailer or a house trailer?

Making money with honey bees requires a lot of work and substantial investment.

Ed
Yea same beehive same colony just a different angle the first two at top were like maybe a year ago the bottom one is about 5 days ago its grown alot and yes its from underneath a mobilehome my dad owns next to his house.

When they say, "Not all bees create honey" they're referring to things like masonry bees, or carpenter bees.  All honey bees produce honey - and those are most certainly honey bees.

You have a wide range of people and as wide a range as why they keep their bees.  For me, I started for a series of reasons.  
   1.) Premature Rheumatoid Arthritis - Bee stings could potentially help with the symptoms.
   2.) The honey - I wanted to try my hand at making mead (honey wine) and honey is expensive!
   3.) I like honey - Most .  
   4.) I like to experiment - Ultimately, I will be doing experiments with my different colonies to check on some of my theories on why beekeeping seems harder for some than others.

Other people are all about the honey.  Some people focus on just the wax, and don't even collect the honey.  Some are after pollen, while others want the propolis.  And some just like the fact that it significantly helps the environment.

It all depends on what your own driving reasons are for becoming a Beek.  I will say, once you've got it started, and you get into doing the research (bees are absolutely fascinating creatures) you'll find yourself keeping more hives than just the one in no time!

All of this said, don't expect to be turning any significant profit with your bees until you have a hundred or so hives, and have gone straight commercial.  However, it's not unusual to get a hundred pounds of honey or so from a strong hive every year.
Wow thats really cool ive seen that on tv and they say it works wonders for really bad arthritis. im assuming all the honey is way up on top of the hive lol these buggars aint stupid they know better than to leave the honey exposed lol.Im gonna take more pics for you guys its been raining lately alot in florida so ill wait till its sunny to a take some more pics maybe some closer clearer pics since now i feel brave enough to get closer to them lol.
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Sundog
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« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2012, 06:19:37 PM »

Jayden

It would be a shame to destroy such a nice hive and it's bees.  I would be glad to collect them, if I can scrounge up a bee vac.  I'm trying to contact a friend with whom I have done exactly this type of cutout before.  Send me an email and we can discuss details.

Will be fun!
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jayden9385
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« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2012, 07:07:06 PM »

Jayden

It would be a shame to destroy such a nice hive and it's bees.  I would be glad to collect them, if I can scrounge up a bee vac.  I'm trying to contact a friend with whom I have done exactly this type of cutout before.  Send me an email and we can discuss details.

Will be fun!
Ok cool are do u live in tampa too or near tampa? give me a few days my dad is remodeling his home inside and out but ill send u an email.
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Sundog
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« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2012, 09:51:37 PM »

Ok cool are do u live in tampa too or near tampa? give me a few days my dad is remodeling his home inside and out but ill send u an email.

I live in Largo, and I am not in any hurry.

Have fun!
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b reeves
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« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2012, 08:14:03 PM »

jayden
if they have been there for 4 years what you see could be the overflow from inside the wall,it looks like it would be a simple cut out,
 Bob
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