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Author Topic: what to do? flow slowed down,have some honey in the supers, need to feed  (Read 874 times)

Offline adamant

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looks like the flow may have slowed down here in n.j. i still have honey supers on which have some capped and un capped honey. the brood boxes are some what empty with honey and i see capped brood. i think i need to think about feeding. if i choose to feed what should i do with the honey that is in the supers? i was thinking about leaving them on but don't want the bees to fill them with sugar honey and mess up my marketable honey.

what do u recommend?

Offline DLMKA

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bees make honey, not sugar syrup.  I'd leave the honey on and let them eat that if they need it but that's my personal opinion.  I'd rather not give them sugar syrup unless they are running out of capped stores or are light going into winter and would otherwise starve.

Offline AllenF

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I would not feed them.   

Offline BrentX

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Give them another two weeks to cap the honey, then take a harvest if you like.  THEN feed if you really must.  There is plenty of time to build up stores before winter in your area.  We usually have a fair fall flow starting  September early that provides honey for the bees winter.  If there are wetlands around your hives you may get a strong fall flow. 

Is there a particular reason you feel compelled to feed now?

Offline Joe D

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I try to leave as much as I think they may need, usually several frames over what they did need.  In my spring harvest this year I had some frames from last year(dark honey) and a couple that had already crystalized.  But for my hives I mixed up 3 gal.s total of sugar syrup last year and until spring flow started this year.  It is their honey I take what is extra, my opinion.



Joe

Offline Vance G

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You might consider stacking all your supers on the heaviest hive bodies colony and feeding the rest until those hive bodies are a little more hefty.  Often times, the bees don't cap cells because that source quits blooming.  They don't mix nectars in the same cell I believe.  Waiting a couple weeks and harvesting is probably the right thing if you are in a dry spell.  Err on the side of caution though when judging the thicknes of the honey.  If any at all shakes out, it is not cured yet.

Offline Bees of Providence Hills

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We have the same problem and I am not sure what to do.  We have only had .3 of an inch of rain in a month and the tempatures have been 90 plus and a couple of 100's.  The forcast is for over 100 for several days next week.  The bees had been bringing in pollen in the mornings but my experienced bee friend told me to feed the bees sugar water so they wouldn't starve since the necter souces have dried up.  The bees were a package that arrived May 7th.  The bees have been drinking a quart in the morning and then feeding another quart in the late afternoon.  They would take more! They seem happy? and are busy bringing in light yellow and bright orange pollen especially in the mornings.  I have on two brood boxes but no honey supers.  Last checked the second brood box on July 4th before I started feeding but it was only 4 frames full and haven't checked it since I started feeding this last week.  Any suggestions?
A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger! Proverbs 15:1

Offline tryintolearn

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i agree with brentx ...give a cpl of more weeks

 

anything